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Annals of the History of Computing, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-March 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Magnetic recording, the first 100 years

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 90
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  • Feymnan and computation: exploring the limits of computers

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 90 - 91
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  • Howard Aiken: portrait of a computer pioneer

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 89
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  • Howard Aiken's third machine: the Howard Mark III calculator or Aiken-Dahlgren electronic calculator

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 62 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    The lines of computing machines that had their origin in the days immediately preceding World War II include a series of calculators which Howard Aiken, a professor of applied mathematics at Harvard University, designed. Starting with the Mark I in 1944, Aiken spearheaded an effort that provided not only the physical means of computation but also the tools to direct them and the people to operate them. The third in this sequence of machines was an innovation in design and implementation, while at the same time being conservative in the selection of components. The Harvard Mark III Calculator had the potential to be a significant entry into the field of computing, but events slowed its completion until competitors finished other markedly superior systems. The Mark III was not a machine that would be emulated or replicated beyond its lifetime, but the people who planned it, built it, programmed it and operated it went on to make significant contributions to the science and practice of computing View full abstract»

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  • Mapping time. the calendar and its history

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 88 - 89
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  • Agricultural computing and the context for John Atanasoff

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 48 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The story of John Atanasoff occupies an unsettled spot in the literature of computing. The material about him ranges from curt dismissals to hagiography. While scholars are getting an ever more accurate picture of Atanasoff's work and his contribution to computing, even the best articles tend to treat him as an aberration, a lone inventor working outside the circle of computing machine researchers. In fact, Atanasoff worked closely with the Iowa State Statistics Laboratory for three years. This laboratory was part of the computing labs that the US Department of Agriculture sponsored. The Department of Agriculture had become interested in computing shortly after World War I. Atanasoff's computer, the Atanasoff-Berry Computer (ABC), was designed to do a time-consuming task for the Statistical Laboratory, the one task that had not been automated with IBM punched card equipment View full abstract»

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  • Biographies

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 86 - 87
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  • Ida Rhodes and the dreams of a human computer

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 82 - 85
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    In the spring of 1952, Ida Rhodes outlined her vision of the digital future in a talk entitled “The human computer's dreams of the future”, which she gave in Los Angeles at a conference sponsored by the Institute of Radio Engineers, a precursor of the IEEE Computer Society. Rhodes described an electronic computer and a computing environment surprisingly similar to present computers and the world in which we work. At times, her descriptions cause the modern reader to wonder why this modest computer scientist is not better known. She described the rise of desktop computers, the use of high-level programming languages, the ubiquity of video displays and the development of graphical user interfaces View full abstract»

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  • Pioneering: on the frontier of electronic data processing, a personal memoir

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 4 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    This personal memoir is essentially an insider's view of IBM-how it worked, the road to its success, and the major decision-making processes IBM used View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

From the analytical engine to the supercomputer, from Pascal to von Neumann, from punched cards to CD-ROMs -- theIEEE Annals of the History of Computing covers the breadth of computer history.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Lars Heide
Copenhagen Business School
Centre for Business History