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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 8 • Date Aug. 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Electronic Inventions and Discoveries Electronics from its Earliest Beginnings to the Present Day [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Japanese Readers and Related Weapons of World War II [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 39 - 40
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Flywheel technology: past, present, and 21st century projections

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 13 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB)  

    This paper describes the present status of flywheel energy storage technology, or mechanical batteries, and discusses realistic future projections that are possible based on stronger composite materials and advancing technology. The origins and use of flywheel technology for mechanical energy storage began several hundred years ago and was developed throughout the Industrial Revolution. One of the first “modern” dissertations on the theoretical stress limitations of rotational disks (isotropic only) is the seminal work by A. Stodola whose first translation to English was made in 1917. The next big milestones were during the 1960s and 1970s when NASA sponsored programs proposed energy storage flywheels as possible primary sources for space missions. However, it was not until the 1980's when microelectronics, magnetic bearing systems and high power density motor-generators became enabling technologies. The next decade proved that a mechanical battery could surpass chemical batteries for many applications View full abstract»

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  • Morgan phenomenon unravels the mysteries of the Universe

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 3 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB)  

    We readily convince ourselves that most achievements can be credited to the construction of powerful jet engines, which enable a spaceship to escape gravity. The principle of jet propulsion seems to work perfectly; jet engines can accelerate a rocket up to an incredible speed of 11 km/sec. Looks like there is nothing left to desire. However, from the physical point of view, 11 km/sec is not such a large value compared, for instance, to the speed of light. Would it be possible to attain half of that speed using gas jets? Unfortunately, the answer is no. Nevertheless, that is not the end of the story. The purpose of this article is to show that it is still possible to use the same principle to remove limitations on attainable speed if instead of gas jets, we employ ultrafast electron beams. The basic idea of our construction was inspired by the paper by H. Morgan (ibid., vol. 13, pp. 5-10, 1998). In that article he experimentally refuted the common premise that nothing can go faster than light and gave some theoretical arguments supporting his experimental data. Although the nature and underlying principles of the Morgan phenomenon are yet to be understood, we can already start thinking of its practical applications View full abstract»

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  • Notes on RF scale testing of tower mounted antennas for cellular communication

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 33 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB)  

    Scale model towers with associated antenna installations provide an efficient and fast means to test current and future 1800 MHz mobile communication base station installations prior to site, antenna type or mounting scheme selection. Repeatability better than 1 dB is readily achieved if the scale reduction is between 1:5-1:15. Many measurements are possible with a very short anechoic test range, just fulfilling the far field requirement. Typical findings include the possibility to effectively reduce interference minima caused by adjacent vertical structures by simply positioning a thin absorptive sheet to the optimum location. Improvements of the order of 20 to 30 dB have been measured View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Teresa Pace, PhD EE
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