Computer

Volume 31 Issue 1 • Jan. 1998

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Innovation and Obstacles: the Future of Computing

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):29 - 38
    Cited by:  Patents (32)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (983 KB)
    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Challenges and trends in processor design

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):39 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2486 KB)

    Chip architects from Sun, Cyrix, Motorola, Mips, Intel and Digital see challenges rather than walls in microprocessor design. They share their insights in this virtual roundtable. Tremblay discusses the conflicting goals of improving how much work a processor does per cycle and at the same time shortening the cycle time. Grohoski says we need to reduce the processor complexity to spend less time d... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Inside Microsoft Research

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):51 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (11)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (461 KB)

    What are 250 top researchers from academia and industry working on at Microsoft Research (MSR)? What attracted them to Redmond, Washington, as well as two new facilities in San Francisco and Cambridge, UK? MSR's appeal to its researchers is that their research will likely be "productized" for the mass market. Each of three metagroups have long-term goals but look for ways to incorporate their rese... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Information appliances: gadget Netopia

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):59 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (18)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1549 KB)

    With the convergence of so many disparate technologies over the past few years, it makes sense that we are now seeing PC descendants emerge as a breed of entirely new products that use their inherited technologies in innovative ways. These inherited technologies include wireless connectivity, Internet access and ultraportability. The combination of these and other technologies is forming a new cla... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Web on wheels: toward Internet-enabled cars

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):69 - 76
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (25)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (457 KB)

    An open system that conforms to standard Internet protocols for communication to and from automobiles could greatly enhance driving. Existing Internet resources can be leveraged to integrate a car into the Internet. Service providers will subsequently produce innovative services for drivers and passengers that will improve safety and security as well as provide infotainment. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Engineering an education for the future

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):77 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (141 KB)

    Faced with rapid and unremitting change in the disciplines of electrical and computer engineering (ECE), some educators argue that they should deliberately not respond aggressively. Rather, educators should focus on fundamentals that will serve the students well for an entire career. Although the authors agree, they go on to explain that this approach largely begs the question of what those fundam... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • 1997 Gordon Bell Prize Winners

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):86 - 92
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (55 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Content-based retrieval in digital libraries

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):93 - 95
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (245 KB)

    With the recent developments in multimedia and telecommunication technologies, content-based information is becoming increasingly important for various areas such as digital libraries, interactive video and multimedia publishing. Multimedia data refers to simple structured data (such as numbers and short strings), large unstructured data (such as text documents, images, audio and video data) and c... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Conflict and consensus: the role of standards

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):138 - 139
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (221 KB)

    Sometime in the future, we will all look back at January 1998 and laugh about the current conflicts in the technology industry. A hindsight perspective inevitably generates a few chuckles, but it also allows us to recognize that conflict is essential to innovation. Conflict energizes the entire process. If there were no conflict (over market shares, protocols, pricing structures, formats, programm... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The future of object technology

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):140 - 141
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (317 KB)

    In the future, object technology will not be confined to a niche. Objects will be pervasive; very little serious software will not be object-oriented at least in some way in 1998 and beyond. Object technology isn't a matter of fashion. It's simply that no-one really knows how to tackle the kind of sophisticated systems that our users now want, without using object technology. It's also that no one... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed articles written for and by computer researchers and practitioners representing the full spectrum of computing and information technology, from hardware to software and from emerging research to new applications. 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sumi Helal
Lancaster University
sumi.helal@computer.org