By Topic

Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Jun 1997

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Development of a long cycle life sealed nickel-zinc battery for high energy-density applications

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 35 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB)  

    Nickel-zinc battery technology is being developed for commercial applications requiring high energy density and high power capability. Development cells have demonstrated the ability to deliver over 60 Watt-hours per kilogram at the one hour rate. Cycle life has been improved to more than 600 cycles at 80% depth of discharge by using a patented, reduced solubility zinc electrode and an improved sealed cell design. More than 8000 charge/discharge cycles at 10% depth-of-discharge have been completed. Large quantities of sealed prismatic cells have been manufactured, including a 140 cell, 220 V battery for a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Implementing reusable, instrument independent test programs in the factory

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 29 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (588 KB)  

    Development of computer programs that control test sequences on Automatic Test Equipment (ATE) is costly and time consuming. Test Programs are usually written by specifying the instruments to be used in the ATE and the sequence of the setup and measurement parameters for these instruments. Reuse of test program software on other ATE is usually not possible without rewriting, revalidating and re-releasing the programs. This paper describes an implementation of a test program software development system and a standard of software runtime architecture used in our factories. The object-oriented development environment and its associated class libraries allow test programs to be written without knowledge of the ATE on which they will be run. Two main principles guided the design: the software architecture was based on recognized formal and industry standards; and our implementation used commercial off-the-shelf software products when possible. Emerging standards such as the IEEE-1226 (ABBET) as well as defacto industry standards including VXI Plug and Play have made our implementation possible. The current draft of the ABBET and P&P standards do not promote this instrument independence, but it is hoped that this will be added as the standards mature. Three immediate benefits are: cost savings that result from reusing validated test programs; cycle time reductions that result from concurrently developing test program software and ATE; and software defect reductions that result from using proven software View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Two low-cost phased arrays

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 39 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (800 KB)  

    In a phased array antenna, the phase shifters (or T/R modules in an active aperture phased array) with their beam-steering control circuitry along with the feed network account for the major hardware cost. This paper presents two antenna array configurations that use simpler feed, simpler phase-shifting and simpler beam-steering control circuitry for realizing low-cost phased arrays. Both are lens configurations. The first one uses a Radant lens, which provides a medium that is loaded with diodes and provides the needed phase shift by switching the diodes on and off. The other configuration employs a ferroelectric dielectric material whose dielectric constant can be varied with an applied DC bias voltage. It is shown that the ferroelectric lens may have further advantages of smaller thickness, simpler beam-steering controls and lower cost View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The standoff observation of enemy ground forces from Project Peek to JointSTARS-A prolusion

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 3 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2892 KB)  

    The author describes the evolution of JointSTARS. In particular he outlines three series of events that led to JointSTARS-an Army, an Air Force and a Joint one. Amongst the topics discussed are: Mohawk SLAR system; ALARM/SOTAS; MLRS3/MARS; and Assault Breaker and Pave Mover View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An annunciator architecture for the year 2000

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 25 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB)  

    Exciting new safeguards and security technologies are on the horizon, and some are even on the shelves today. Self-testing sensors, smart sensors, and intelligent alarm analyzers are all designed to provide useful information to the operator. However, today's current annunciator systems were not designed to accommodate these new technologies. New display technologies are also changing the look and feel of the annunciator of the future. Annunciator technology needs to “catch up” to these other security technologies. This paper presents the concept for a new, object-oriented approach to annunciator architecture design. The new architecture could accommodate simple, switch-closure devices as well as information-rich sensors and intelligent analyzers. In addition the architecture could allow other leading-edge interfaces to be easily integrated into the annunciator system. These technologies will reduce operator workload and aid the operator in making informed security decisions View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • TOPEX/Poseidon: Electrical power system-lessons learned

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 18 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (664 KB)  

    The main objective of the TOPEX/Poseidon Spacecraft is to monitor the world's oceans for scientific study of weather and climate prediction, coastal storm warning and maritime safety. The operational conditions of this satellite imposed challenging requirements for the on-board Electrical Power System (EPS), Going through various phases of its development and on-orbit performance verifications, there were certain events and/or circumstances we would have liked to avoid. Some circumstances were avoided with preventative measures, other potentially detrimental events were not. Thus, a number of valuable lessons were learned which are presented in this paper View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
12601 Research Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
(407) 450-0929 (BB)
tpace@sentech.dsci.com