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Control Systems, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Aug. 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Robust Control [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (397 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Advanced Control with Matlab and Simulink [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (148 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Adaptive inverse control [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (256 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Air traffic management: evolution with technology

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 12 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2144 KB)  

    One of the remarkable features of ATM systems from a control perspective is that there is no tolerance for system shutdown and start-up. The system literally must operate 24 hours per day, seven days per week. It is not feasible to simply shut down an old system and start up a new one. The economic and social costs of declaring that one day will be a day with no air traffic while the systems are switched are simply prohibitive. ATM, at least as far into the future as we can imagine, is a system with essential human and machine components. It is inconceivable that either component will ever disappear. Yet, as the system evolves, there are continual changes in the way work is shared between human and machine. Provision for such flexibility is an essential requirement for any proposed new system. New technologies are driving the ATM paradigm from command and control in the direction of more distributed decision making. This may be best illustrated by TCAS (the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System). TCAS is a tactical system intended for use by pilots to avoid collisions caused by inadvertent violations of separation standards. It displays to the flight crew specific information about certain nearby aircraft and, depending on the likelihood of conflict, provides advice for actions needed to avoid collisions. Details of TCAS are given in the article View full abstract»

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  • Dual control for an unstable mechanical plant

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 31 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (716 KB)  

    The problem of applying direct dual control for positioning of a laboratory pilot-plant for the roll angle control of a vertical takeoff airplane by means of two propellers is described in the article. The bicriterial approach is applied for the synthesis of dual controllers, where two criteria are used which correspond to the two goals of dual control: control of the system output and exciting the system for speeding up the parameter estimation. The control law is derived after compromised optimization of two cost functions. The basic theory needed for synthesis of a direct dual control for linear single-input, single-output plants is discussed. After describing the experimental setup, the results of adaptive control of a mechanical laboratory pilot-plant are presented. It is pointed out that adaptive control is necessary and is the most suitable approach for this kind of plant. The new direct dual control algorithm is compared with indirect and direct adaptive control strategies based on the standard CE assumption View full abstract»

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  • Identification and control of systems with friction using accelerated evolutionary programming

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 38 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (18)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (884 KB)  

    This article proposes a novel evolutionary algorithm, called accelerated evolutionary programming (AEP), which improves evolutionary programming in terms of convergence speed and diversity. Comparison between the proposed algorithm and evolutionary programming is carried out for five widely used test functions to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. The proposed algorithm is applied to the identification of a seven-parameter friction model of an X-Y table, which is adopted from the results of tribology studies. Based on the identified friction model, a compensator is designed for the control of the X-Y table without stick-slip motion at very low velocity. Experimental results on the X-Y table demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, especially for very-low-speed tracking View full abstract»

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  • Phase-root locus and relative stability

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 69 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1420 KB)  

    A new graphical tool called the phase-root locus is introduced. It is the dual of the conventional root locus, and indicates the motion of closed-loop poles in the s-plane as phase is added to the open-loop transfer function. The root locus/phase-root locus plots are shown to facilitate destabilization diagnosis, which may help determine what part of an unstable physical system requires modification. For example, destabilization may be caused by one closed-loop pole due to a phase-shift at one value of system gain, and by a different pole due to gain variations at another value of system gain. The phase-root locus also allows relative stability information, including phase margin, to be accessed from the s-plane. Thus the s-plane can now be used for robustness analysis/design as well as transient analysis/design. The phase-root locus shows promise as a tool in compensator design as well as in the teaching of classical control theory View full abstract»

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  • Linear and neural network feedback for flight control decoupling

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 22 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1452 KB)  

    Some experts are of the opinion that the task of flight training can become far less labor-intensive if the pilot can directly control each of the state variables of the aircraft individually. Yet complete decoupling of the aircraft as a nonlinear system is a formidable problem. Such a task requires accurate aircraft state information and rapid computing. The difficulties are compounded when the dynamics or the aerodynamics of the aircraft fall in the highly nonlinear regimes. The authors demonstrate the potential for an artificial neural network in conjunction with a linear compensator to perform such a function. The authors show that the linear compensator is unable to control the aircraft in the absence of the neural network. A neural network can be trained to produce the large nonlinear portion of the control inputs; however, a hybrid combination of the neural network and the compensator based on the linearized equations of motion gives the best results. Furthermore, The authors demonstrate that such a hybrid system can tolerate a large amount of noise in the network input. Several examples are shown, with and without the linear compensator. Finally, the authors demonstrate generalization within the training domain through accurately predicting a case that was absent in the training domain View full abstract»

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  • Anti-windup, bumpless, and conditioned transfer techniques for PID controllers

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 48 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (104)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (696 KB)  

    Gives a simple and comprehensive review of anti-windup, bumpless and conditioned transfer techniques in the framework of the PID controller. We show that the most suitable anti-windup strategy for usual applications is the conditioning technique, using the notion of the realizable reference. The exception is the case in which the input limitations are too restrictive. In this case, we propose the anti-windup method with a free parameter tuned to obtain a compromise between the incremental algorithm and the conditioning technique. We also introduce the new notion of conditioned transfer, and we it to be a more suitable solution than bumpless transfer. All the discussions are supported by simulations View full abstract»

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IEEE Control Systems Magazine is the largest circulation technical periodical worldwide devoted to all aspects of control systems.

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Editor-in-Chief
Jonathan P. How
jhow@mit.edu