IEEE Security & Privacy

Volume 3 Issue 2 • March-April 2005

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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):1 - 2
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  • What's in a Name?

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):4 - 5
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  • Masthead

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s): 6
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  • FBI's virtual case file living in limbo

    Publication Year: 2005
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • News Briefs

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):8 - 10
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  • Crypto 2004

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):11 - 13
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  • A Framework to Consider

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s): 14
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  • Does trusted computing remedy computer security problems?

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):16 - 19
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (164 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The authors examine whether trusted computing is likely to remedy the relevant security problems in PCs. They argue that although trusted computing has some merits, it neither provides a complete remedy nor is it likely to prevail in the PC mass market. View full abstract»

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  • Protecting client privacy with trusted computing at the server

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):20 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (25)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (245 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Current trusted-computing initiatives usually involve large organizations putting physically secure hardware on user machines, potentially violating user privacy. Yet, it's possible to exploit robust server-side secure hardware to enhance user privacy Two case studies demonstrate using secure coprocessors at the server. View full abstract»

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  • Sociotechnical architecture for online privacy

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):29 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (294 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Users' concerns regarding privacy issues are lowering their trust in e-services and, thus, affecting the widespread adoption of online services. To increase users' perceived control over their privacy, the authors propose a novel e-privacy architecture. View full abstract»

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  • Canning SPAM: Proposed solutions to unwanted email

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):40 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (353 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Unsolicited email is a major problem for anyone who transmits or receives email on a computer, telephone, or personal digital assistant. This article describes the magnitude of the problem, the reasons for proliferation, some interventions available today, and the degree to which each has been effective. View full abstract»

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  • Technology education at the US Military Academy

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):49 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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  • Methodological foundations: enabling the next generation of security

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):54 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Violating assumptions with fuzzing

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):58 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (58)  |  Patents (3)
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  • Worm propagation and generic attacks

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):63 - 65
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
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  • Turing is from Mars, Shannon is from Venus: computer science and computer engineering

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):66 - 69
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  • Averting security missteps in outsourcing

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):70 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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  • Knowledge for software security

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s):74 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
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  • The Problem Statement is the Problem

    Publication Year: 2005, Page(s): 80
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Security & Privacy’s primary objective is to stimulate and track advances in security, privacy, and dependability and present these advances in a form that can be useful to a broad cross-section of the professional community—ranging from academic researchers to industry practitioners. It provides articles with both a practical and research bent by the top thinkers in the field of security and privacy, along with case studies, surveys, tutorials, columns, and in-depth interviews and podcasts for the information security industry.
 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
David M. Nicol
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
dmnicol@illinois.edu