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3D Data Processing Visualization and Transmission, 2002. Proceedings. First International Symposium on

Date 19-21 June 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 133
  • Proceedings First International Symposium on 3D Data Processing Visualization and Transmission

    Publication Year: 2002
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  • Filling holes in complex surfaces using volumetric diffusion

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 428 - 441
    Cited by:  Papers (47)  |  Patents (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2970 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We address the problem of building watertight 3D models from surfaces that contain holes - for example, sets of range scans that observe most but not all of a surface. We specifically address situations in which the holes are too geometrically and topologically complex to fill using triangulation algorithms. Our solution begins by constructing a signed distance function, the zero set of which defines the surface. Initially, this function is defined only in the vicinity of observed surfaces. We then apply a diffusion process to extend this function through the volume until its zero set bridges whatever holes may be present. If additional information is available, such as known-empty regions of space inferred from the lines of sight to a 3D scanner, it can be incorporated into the diffusion process. Our algorithm is simple to implement, is guaranteed to produce manifold non-interpenetrating surfaces, and is efficient to run on large datasets because computation is limited to areas near holes. View full abstract»

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  • Author index

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 861 - 864
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  • Active polygon for object tracking

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 696 - 699
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (385 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

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  • Probabilistic 3D data usion for adaptive resolution surface generation

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 578 - 587
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • A model (In)validation approach to gait recognition

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 700 - 703
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

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  • Triangle mesh-based surface modeling using adaptive smoothing and implicit surface texture integration

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 588 - 597
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (783 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Presents a framework of surface modeling from multi-view range data. The input to the algorithms are triangle meshes, each of which is from a single view range scan. The triangle meshes generated from raw data are first processed by the proposed area decreasing flow for surface denoising. Although the proposed flow is mathematically equivalent to the mean curvature flow, it can avoid the difficulty in curvature estimation and provide an optimal flowing step size. We introduce an adaptive triangle mesh smoothing scheme based on crease edge strength of each vertex using tensor voting of the normal vector field inside a geodesic window. The smoothing result makes surface normal estimation more accurate which is then used in surface mesh integration. Based on Hilton's implicit surface-based method, surfaces from multiple views are integrated into a single 3D model. We incorporate color images to generate textured models. The algorithms are successfully applied to surface modeling from range data using two types of range scanners. View full abstract»

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  • A hierarchy of cameras for 3D photography

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 2 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (950 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We investigate the relationship between camera design and 3D photography, by examining the influence of camera design on the estimation of the motion and structure of a scene from video data. To compute the 3D structure of a scene accurately from a moving vision sensor we need to be able to estimate the motion of the sensor from the recorded image information, a problem that has been well-studied By relating the differential structure of the time varying plenoptic function to different known and new camera designs, we can establish a hierarchy of cameras based upon the stability and complexity of the computations necessary to estimate structure and motion. At the low end of this hierarchy is the standard planar pinhole camera for which the structure from motion problem is non-linear and ill-posed. At the high end is a camera, which we call the full field of view polydioptric camera, for which the problem is linear and stable. In between are multiple view cameras with a large field of view which we have built, as well as omni-directional sensors. We develop design suggestions for a polydioptric camera especially suited for 3D photography, and we propose a linear algorithm utilizing this camera design to recover the structure of the scene. View full abstract»

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  • An approach to using image-based techniques across unreliable peer-to-peer networks

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 52 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (284 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes an image-based modelling pipeline for use over peer-to-peer networks in cultural heritage, and other applications. There has been a considerable interest in the development of architectures for a decentralized form of networking enabling cross-device communication and data exchange. The use of regular under-utilised computers instead of specialised servers offers a more effective approach to distributed computing by shifting 3D content where it is more needed thereby providing better load balancing. However, peer-to-peer networks are classified as unreliable, and the constants peer connection and disconnection are serious factors to evaluate during the architectural design. This paper illustrates some of the problems, and provides a first step towards their solutions. View full abstract»

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  • A gesture recognition system using 3D data

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 190 - 193
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (332 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper a gesture recognition system using 3D data is described The system relies on a novel 3D sensor that generates a dense range image of the scene. The main novelty of the proposed system, with respect to other 3D gesture recognition techniques, is the capability for robust recognition of complex hand postures such as those encountered in sign language alphabets. This is achieved by explicitly employing 3D hand features. Moreover the proposed approach does not rely on colour information, and guarantees robust segmentation of the hand under various illumination conditions, and content of the scene. Several novel 3D image analysis algorithms are presented covering the complete processing chain: 3D image acquisition, arm segmentation, hand-forearm segmentation, hand pose estimation, 3D feature extraction, and gesture classification. The proposed system is tested in an application scenario involving the recognition of sign-language postures. View full abstract»

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  • Stochastic mesh-based multiview reconstruction

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 568 - 577
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (792 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A method for reconstruction of 3D polygonal models from multiple views is presented. The method uses sampling techniques to construct a texture-mapped semiregular polygonal mesh of the object in question. Given a set of views and segmentation of the object in each view, constructive solid geometry is used to build a visual hull from silhouette prisms. The resulting polygonal mesh is simplified and subdivided to produce a semiregular mesh. Regions of model fit inaccuracy are found by projecting the reference images onto the mesh from different views. The resulting error images for each view are used to compute a probability density function, and several points are sampled from it. Along the epipolar lines corresponding to these sampled points, photometric consistency is evaluated. The mesh surface is then pulled towards the regions of higher photometric consistency using free-form deformations. This sampling-based approach produces a photometrically consistent solution in much less time than possible with previous multi-view algorithms given arbitrary camera placement. View full abstract»

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  • Distributed quantitative evaluation of 3D patient specific arterial models

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 58 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (541 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we describe a new system for the 3D reconstruction and distribution on the Internet of models for vessel structures. The system is specifically designed to support measurements of medical interest. We describe 2D and 3D segmentation methods implemented and the procedure used to build interactive VRML97 models. The experimental section presents a comparison between segmentation methods, and a first application to surgical planning for endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms. View full abstract»

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  • Effects of joystick mapping and field-of-view on human performance in virtual walkthroughs

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 490 - 493
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (455 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Virtual environments are increasingly used to visit virtual mockups of proposed buildings or virtualized models of real sites or buildings. This paper presents the results of a human-machine interaction experiment aimed at measuring the effects of the real field-of-view (FOV) and of the use of a third joystick axis on human performance for navigation in virtual walkthroughs in a closed-space environment. The results indicate that neither the real FOV nor the third joystick axis significantly affect performance. There is however a perceived increase of immersion with the larger real FOV, and an added freedom of movement when a third axis of movement is mapped onto the joystick. View full abstract»

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  • Weaver, an automatic texture builder

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 562 - 565
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (455 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Given in input a 3D digital model of a real object and a set of images from different view points, the problem considered is how to build a single texture map which integrates the color info contained in the input images, minimizing redundancy and optimizing the color attribute representation. We improve a previous solution (which stitches the images on the geometry) by introducing a new approach for a better color matching of the different adjoining texture chunks. The new solution applies cross-correlation and interpolation of the input images directly on the texture image space. Our averaging technique can remove color difference or discontinuity between adjacent sections of the 3D models which are mapped on different input images; in particular, the process is performed on the whole texture, contrary to other approaches that limit color smoothing on small transition zones. View full abstract»

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  • A real-time realization of geometrical valid view synthesis or tele-conferencing with viewpoint adaptation

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 327 - 336
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (812 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

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  • Network-based raditional japanese crafting presentation system using agent and virtual reality echnologies

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 194 - 197
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  • Towards automatic modeling of monuments and towers

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 526 - 531
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2824 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Three-dimensional modeling from images, when carried out entirely by a human, can be time consuming and impractical for large-scale projects. On the other hand, full automation may be unachievable or not accurate enough for many applications such as culture heritage documentation. In addition, three-dimensional modeling from images, particularly fully automated methods, requires the extraction of features, such as corners, and needs them to appear in multiple images. However, in practical situations those features are not always available, sometimes not even in a single image, due to occlusions or lack of texture on the surface. Taking closely separated images or optimally designing view locations can preclude some occlusions. However, taking such images is often not practical and we are left with small number of images that do not properly cover every surface or corner. The approach presented in this paper uses both interactive and automatic techniques, each where it is best suited, to accurately and completely model monuments and towers. It particularly focuses on automating the construction of unmarked surfaces such as columns, arches, and blocks from minimum available clues. It also extracts the occluded or invisible corners from existing ones. Many examples, such as Arc de Triomphe in Paris, Florence's St. John baptistery at Santa Maria del Fiori Cathedral, and other monuments and towers from around the world are completely modeled from a small number of images taken by tourists. View full abstract»

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  • Mathematical aspects of shape reconstruction from an image sequence

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 632 - 635
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    It is possible to decompose a three-dimensional objects into a collection of shadows. The geometric relation permits one to decompose shadows of a three-dimensional object to shadows of planar objects. Using this geometric relations, we prove that a class of non-convex objects is reconstructible from a series of shadows. View full abstract»

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  • Volume rendering on the Internet

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 70 - 74
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (768 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Volume rendering is a well-developed technology for visualization. It had been used for medical data visualization in both research and clinic. The massive growths of the Internet and the World Wide Web lead us to a completely new way of looking at the development and distribution of visualization software. Using Java as programming language, we developed the 3D applet that rendered medical images on Internet. The client upload their 2D images, visit WWW server to get the 3D results of renderings. It changes traditional computing mode and realizes the share of information. It provides the tool for telemedicine visualization. Different organ images are shown in this paper. The results are clear enough to be involved for clinical diagnosis and proved this method to be practical. View full abstract»

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  • Mosaic construction from a sparse set of views

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 177 - 180
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a flexible approach for mosaic construction from a sparse set of uncalibrated views. The observation, that in architectural environments the majority of lines is aligned with the principal orthogonal directions of the world coordinate frame, is exploited in different stages of the mosaic construction pipeline. In the first stage the vanishing points are automatically detected and used for partial calibration of the camera and estimation of camera's relative orientation with respect to the scene. This single view analysis enables efficient feature matching and alignment of multiple views. In the final mosaic construction stage the internal camera parameters are refined simultaneously using all available views. We point out some practical issues related to the conditioning of this self-calibration technique. While the approach described here can be presented in the context of rotational mosaics, the alignment and matching techniques are applicable for general displacements, where the constraints of man-made environments are present and the displacement between the views is large. View full abstract»

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  • Second order local analysis for 3D reconstruction of specular surfaces

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 356 - 361
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (318 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We analyze the problem of recovering the shape of a mirror surface. A calibrated scene composed of lines passing through a point is assumed. The lines are reflected by the mirror surface onto the image plane of a calibrated camera, where the intersection, orientation and curvature of such reflections are measured. The relationship between the local geometry of the surface around the point of reflection and the measurements is analyzed. We extend the analysis in Savarese and Perona. (2001, 2002), where we recovered positions and normals and second order local geometry of a specular surface up to one unknown parameter. We show that, provided that we work in a neighborhood of a surface whose third order surface terms can be neglected, the second order parameter ambiguity can be solved by equating the curvatures observed for the reflected lines with those computed from analytical differentiation followed by a perspective projection. View full abstract»

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  • Half-edge multi-tessellation: compact representation for multi-resolution tetrahedral meshes

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 494 - 499
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  • 3D interactive, on-site visualization of ancient Olympia

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 337 - 345
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1631 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the work performed for the ARCHEOGUIDE (Augmented Reality-based Cultural Heritage On-site GUIDE) project. ARCHEOGUIDE is funded by the EU IST framework (IST-1999-11306), and pursued by a consortium of European organizations. It delivers an interactive, personalized, augmented reality (AR) guide for the visualization of ruined archaeological sites. It is based on mobile real-time computing, networking, and 3D visualization. Its users are presented with monument reconstructions, navigation aid and historical information in a user-friendly way through the use of multi-modal interaction techniques. The key features of the system are a novel hybrid position and orientation tracking technique used in determining the user's viewpoint, navigation aid, outdoor operation, and real-time 3D visualization of monuments, artifacts, and life. This paper presents examples of the system's use at the archaeological site of ancient Olympia in Greece. View full abstract»

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  • Tracking densely moving markers

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 682 - 685
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (591 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper a new approach to the reconstruction of 3D trajectories of dense marker sets is proposed. The key element is the use of multiple passes to reconstruct the spatiotemporal structure of the movement with high reliability. First the tracking procedure computes a coarse structure of the motion, which is then recursively refined disambiguating difficult classification of the markers. The tracking procedure is based on integrating the temporal dimension in the matching process, by analyzing strings instead of points to derive more robust matches. Strings are analyzed using smoothness, n-focal constraints, and fitting of a skeleton to derive a proper matching. An innovative augmented reality-like interface greatly simplifies the labeling task. Lastly, a proper value for the critical parameters is automatically derived. Results on real data show that the system is able to produce a robust and largely complete set of trajectories, which greatly minimize the time required by post-processing. View full abstract»

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  • Architecture of a 3D-simulation environment for active vision systems and mobile robots

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 198 - 201
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (539 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Working with active vision-systems, users often have to simulate particular environments in which they can undertake experiments with virtual sensors. In such artificial environments all parameter settings have to be fully controllable. Thus a simulation framework based on a component-oriented concept will be proposed in order to facilitate the integration of arbitrary simulation modules, e.g. particular sensors, environmental artifacts and even additional platforms for robots. The introduced system aims at enabling visual simulation state-monitoring. It also provides interfaces which are identical to those of hardware platforms already in use. This ensures that existing active vision or robotic applications can use the simulator in the same way. Although it is not intended to replace the real system completely, this application does represent an important addition to the system for both research and teaching purposes. View full abstract»

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