IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems

Issue 2 • April 2019

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  • Table of Contents

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems publication information

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s): C2
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  • Dual-Axis Manual Control: Performance Degradation, Axis Asymmetry, Crossfeed, and Intermittency

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):113 - 125
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1569 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Vehicle control tasks require simultaneous control of multiple degrees-of-freedom. Most multi-axis human-control modeling is limited to the modeling of multiple fully independent single axes. This paper contributes to the understanding of multi-axis control behavior and draws a more realistic and complete picture of dual-axis manual control. A human-in-the-loop experiment was performed to study fo... View full abstract»

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  • Human Adaptation to Human–Robot Shared Control

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):126 - 136
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2037 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Human-in-the-loop robot control systems naturally provide the means for synergistic human–robot collaboration through control sharing. The expectation in such a system is that the strengths of each partner are combined to achieve a task performance higher than that can be achieved by the individual partners alone. However, there is no general established rule to ensure a synergistic partnership. I... View full abstract»

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  • Age and Gender Differences in Performance for Operating a Robotic Manipulator

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):137 - 149
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3301 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This paper examines the performance differences across gender and age when operating a robotic manipulator arm and also seeks to determine which human factors are considered important predictors of performance for each group. To examine these differences, 93 participants were recruited and divided up into both male (46) and female (47) as well as young (46) and old (47). While men and women had ne... View full abstract»

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  • Team Coordination and Effectiveness in Human-Autonomy Teaming

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):150 - 159
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1427 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In the past, team coordination dynamics have been explored using nonlinear dynamical systems (NDS) methods, but the relationship between team coordination dynamics and team performance for all-human teams was assumed to be linear. The current study examines team coordination dynamics with an extended version of the NDS methods and assumes that its relationship with team performance for human-auton... View full abstract»

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  • Semantic Place Understanding for Human–Robot Coexistence—Toward Intelligent Workplaces

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):160 - 170
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3502 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Recent introductions of robots to everyday scenarios have revealed unprecedented opportunities for collaboration and social interaction between robots and people. However, to date, such interactions are hampered by a significant challenge: having a semantic understanding of their environment. Even simple requirements, such as “a robot should always be in the kitchen when a person is there,” are di... View full abstract»

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  • Framework for Human Haptic Perception With Delayed Force Feedback

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):171 - 182
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1991 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Time delays in haptic teleoperation affect the ability of human operators to assess mechanical properties (damping, mass, and stiffness) of the remote environment. To address this, we propose a unified framework for human haptic perception of the mechanical properties of environments with delayed force feedback. In a first experiment, we found that the delay in the force feedback led our subjects ... View full abstract»

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  • Co-Design of Musical Haptic Wearables for Electronic Music Performer's Communication

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):183 - 193
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1689 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Communication among performers is a fundamental aspect in music performance. A large number of electronic music instruments based on tangible and screen-based interfaces require a focused visual attention from performers while they are controlled. In certain stage and artistic configurations, this may be an obstacle to face-to-face creative interactions between coperformers and their collaborators... View full abstract»

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  • Using Wearable Sensors to Capture Posture of the Human Lumbar Spine in Competitive Swimming

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s):194 - 205
    Request permission for reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4294 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Motion capture based on wearable inertial sensors is a promising technique for swimmers' training. To apply motion capture techniques properly, a swimming motion evaluation method based on inertial motion capture technology is proposed. Our proposed method uses a multisensor data fusion algorithm for swimmers’ attitude estimation, and the swimming posture is reconstructed in combination with a hum... View full abstract»

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  • International Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work in Design

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s): 206
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  • International Conference on Human-Machine Systems

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s): 207
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  • IEEE Open Access Publishing

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s): 208
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  • IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society Information

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s): C3
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  • IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems information for authors

    Publication Year: 2019, Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

The scope of the IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems includes the fields of human machine systems. It covers human systems and human organizational interactions including cognitive ergonomics, system test and evaluation, and human information processing concerns in systems and organizations.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
David B. Kaber
University of Florida
Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering
Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
303 Weil Hall / P.O. Box 116595
Gainesville, FL 32611
Phone: 352.294.7700
dkaber@ise.ufl.edu