By Topic

Aerospace and Electronics Conference, 1995. NAECON 1995., Proceedings of the IEEE 1995 National

Date 22-26 May 1995

Go

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 67
  • Proceedings of the IEEE 1995 National Aerospace arrd Electronics Conference NAECON 1995

    Publication Year: 1995
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (701 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Cross reference [author index]

    Publication Year: 1995
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Performance analysis of fiber optic receiver in impulsive noise environment

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 839 - 842 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (204 KB)  

    In EM environment impulsive noise may be introduced through power supply cables to fiber optic receivers. In this paper we derive the EER formulas with two types of noise amplitude distribution. After calculation the results show impulsive noise caused bit errors much severely. However, high performance filter and voltage stabilization circuits may improve optical receiver performance (BER performance) dramatically View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Analytical solution for a steady-state Kalman filter tracker with random power spectral density process noise

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 748 - 751 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (136 KB)  

    An analytical solution is obtained for a steady-state Kalman filter tracker with a random power spectral density as process noise. Great insight is obtained from these analytic solutions of trackers. Optimal relationships are obtained between the gain variables. A unitless tracking index is defined as the only variable driving the steady-state Kalman filter tracker. This unitless tracking index value is defined as: Λ=√(psd8(ΔT)3m 2). Optimal gains and minimum covariance are analytically calculated given the tracking index ΛA View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • J-mass graphical configuration and execution

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 752 - 759 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (768 KB)  

    McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) has developed a graphical user interface (GUI) for use in digital, interactive and manned simulation to initialize a mission, monitor performance and provide debriefing of the simulation. Portions of the GUI have been adapted as tools for use with the Joint Modeling and Simulation System(J-MASS). The GUI will allow users to have graphical tools available to aid in configuring a simulation, viewing the results during execution and providing additional tools for post processing. At MDA, analysts and developers prefer a similar “look and feel” to their tools With the maximum amount of graphics for use in their analysis and to simplify the set-up and monitoring of the results. Since MDA has used graphical tools for several years in their aircraft and missile simulations, it seemed quite natural to apply them to new modeling and simulation environments like J-MASS View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Military products from commercial lines

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 963 - 966 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB)  

    Describes a pilot program within the Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate's Industrial Base Pilots Office. TRW's Military Electronics and Avionics Division (MEAD) will lead the program. This pilot program will demonstrate “dual use” manufacturing by producing F-22 military avionics modules on an automotive electronics production line operated by TRW's Transportation Electronics Division. To accomplish this requires a redesign of the modules so that they can be producible using commercial automotive electronics processes. Dual use manufacturing also dictates establishing compatible business policies and practices, manufacturing infrastructures and process technologies. Business Policies and Practices that must be changed involve accounting procedures, contracting requirements, audit requirements and quality control. Manufacturing infrastructure improvements include incorporation of advanced concurrent engineering tools and process control software to allow economic production of small lot sizes. Process technology changes involve designing production lines that are highly automated and compatible with commercial practices View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • J-MASS DIS interface using ports

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 760 - 765 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (252 KB)  

    McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) developed a Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) interface to existing simulation models for use on the DIS network. Several of the key features of the interface include the use of ports, which provide an application independent input/output capability to any object, a Standardized Multiple Array Translating and Integrating Environment (SMARTIE) task which translates the communications from one interface to another and the DIS hardware/software interface which sends/receives the network data. All of these components were integrated with the Joint Modeling and Simulation System (J-MASS) and used for a test which included other digital/interactive/manned simulation units View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Module management architecture for embedded nonvolatile memory

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 654 - 658 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (336 KB)  

    This paper describes a novel memory management scheme used for two avionics projects currently in progress at the Georgia Tech Research Institute. The main focus will be the module management architecture (MMA) which provides the flexibility needed for the development and maintenance of large integrated systems that are heavily software dependent. This architecture allows code to be separated into task-specific executable modules which build and load independently while performing as one module. This scheme supports shorter development cycles and reduced time for future system enhancements and maintenance which is critical in reducing software cost View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Dual use applications of hazard monitoring: commercial and military aviation and beyond

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 948 - 955 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (612 KB)  

    Hazard Monitoring is an innovative approach to addressing the problem of human error in complex systems: our Hazard Monitor aids the operator in recovery from hazardous situations, rather than attempting to prevent operator errors. A hazardous situation is one which may result in a Range of negative consequences, from a violation of system guidelines to a loss of equipment, or even loss of life. When the Hazard Monitor detects a hazardous situation, it creates a message and dispatches it to the operators, so that they become aware of and can remedy the situation before the negative consequences occur. Because the Hazard Monitor considers system states in relation to ongoing system activities, it is able to tailor the messages, adjusting both timing and content to reflect the context of the predicted consequences. By prompting for operator action to avert consequences as hazards arise, but remaining silent when operations are normal, the Hazard Monitor serves an unobtrusive operator aid, functioning without direct operator control. Hazard Monitoring technology has been designed as a general purpose technology, capable of assisting complex system operators in a wide variety of domains. This paper describes the Hazard Monitoring technology and its application in both military and commercial avionics domains, as well as other, non-avionics domains View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Effect of DFB laser FM response on multichannel optical systems

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 892 - 898 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (332 KB)  

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis for multichannel minimum shift keying (MSK) FM and linecoded frequency shift keying (FSK) using nonuniform FM laser to evaluate their relative effectiveness in a multichannel environment. The modified Monte Carlo simulation of the system using “importance sampling” technique shows that delay modulation (DM) FSK and MSK-FM perform almost equally and provide better performance than the alternate mark inversion (AMI) and Manchester coded (MC) FSK systems View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Adaptive neural network for identification and tracking control of a robotic manipulator

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 601 - 609 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (624 KB)  

    Effective control strategies for robotic manipulators require on-line computation of the robot dynamic model in real-time. However, the complexity of robot dynamic model makes this difficult to achieve in practice. Neural networks are an attractive alternative for identification and control of robotic manipulators, because of their ability to learn and approximate functions. This paper presents the development of an adaptive Multilayer Neural Network (MNN) as a feedforward controller for a robotic manipulator. The MNN is trained to identify the unknown nonlinear plant (inverse dynamics of a robotic manipulator) using a modified back-propagation technique. A PD controller is used in the feedback loop to guarantee global asymptotic stability. Also, the output of the PD controller is used as a learning signal for the on-line learning to adjust the weights of the MNN to capture any parameters variation and/or disturbances. The controller architecture developed has been simulated and its effect on the trajectory tracking performance of a manipulator has been evaluated and compared to the conventional adaptive controller View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Multifunction aircraft support system

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 967 - 971 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB)  

    This paper describes a concept of modular aircraft support equipment that combines several maintenance and servicing utilities in single carts. This design innovation, called Multifunction Aircraft Support System (MASS), will reduce the mobility footprint for combat deployment and help to reduce the proliferation and cost of aerospace ground equipment in peacetime View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A simulation model to measure direct access storage device (DASD) performance

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 737 - 744 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (700 KB)  

    With the vast amounts of data being collected, analyzed and stored for today's information highway, the type and quantity of computer equipment storage media has become critical to the cost of operating a computer data service center. Processor storage is obviously the most desirable medium from a performance perspective, however, it is also the most costly. The other extreme is off-line storage such as a tape cartridge system which is the most inexpensive method but leaves much to be desired with respect to user response time. A reasonable alternative is DASD. In fact, in many installations the “DASD farm” is comparable in cost to the Central Processing Unit (CPU) configuration. The Department of Defense (DOD) is in the process of reducing costs and improving productivity by migrating and consolidating existing application software onto state-of-the-art computer hardware. Integral to this effort is: the Government's attempt to optimize the hardware data storage configurations required to support its users. Through simulation modeling, the BMC manager can analyze alternative configurations without actually incurring the associated expense. The simulation effort discussed in this paper describes an approach taken to model the DASD subsystem. A model was built using the SLAM simulation language View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Reduction of aliasing in staring infrared imagers utilizing subpixel techniques

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 874 - 880 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (708 KB)  

    In this paper, we will introduce and analyze techniques for the reduction of aliased power in a staring infrared imaging system. A standard staring system uses a fixed two dimensional detector array which implies a fixed spatial sampling frequency corresponding to the detector to detector spacing. Aliasing will occur when sampling a scene containing spatial frequencies exceeding half of this sampling frequency. Most natural scenes are not band limited and aliasing can significantly degrade the quality and utility of the resulting image. The alias reduction schemes presented here are based upon microscanning, which is an optical technique utilizing subpixel shifts between multiple time frames in an image sequence. These multiple images are used to reconstruct a single frame with reduced aliasing, The microscanning techniques presented here are divided into the categories of controlled and uncontrolled techniques. If the microscanning is controlled, using a microscan mirror or beam steerer for example, one can obtain a uniformly sampled microscanned image. The reconstruction in this case is a relatively simple task. In an uncontrolled case, the sampling may be nonuniform and the reconstruction becomes more complicated. Experimental results are presented which illustrate that the quality of a microscanned image can be dramatically improved over a non-microscanned image as well as demonstrate the utility of the applied algorithms View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The theory of single sensor altitude determination

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 851 - 858 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (544 KB)  

    Beginning with the phenomenological equations of remote sensing and atmospheric transmission, we show that the altitude of a bright point-source target (such as a missile or afterburning aircraft) within the atmosphere can be determined with a single spaceborne multispectral sensor. Our calculation assumes that the target signal can be isolated from its background. And we do not consider noise. Essentially, we are measuring an attenuating molecules column density along the line of sight to determine range to the target. The range to the target which satisfies our equations is then transformed to altitude through our column density characterization. The column density measurement requires the sensor to simultaneously (or alternately) collect in two or more spectral bands associated with the attenuating molecule, and depends on the key assumptions that (1) we know the relative spectral emission of the target (i.e. we can classify the target) and (2) we know the attenuating molecule's vertical number density distribution. We evaluate the effects of uncertainty in our knowledge of these two key parameters by using a hydrocarbon-burning missile and carbon dioxide as examples. We demonstrate that the error in our determination of altitude is a small fraction of one scale height of the attenuating molecule (assuming an exponentially characterized atmosphere) View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The assembly-language translation of the operational flight program for a tactical fighter plane's radar data processor

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 923 - 929 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (672 KB)  

    As military budgets shrink, military contractors are under increasing pressure to produce high performance systems for the lowest possible cost. For new weapons systems, this pressure generally has meant exploiting the economies of scale of standardized, military-approved microprocessor chips. As currently-deployed systems age, an equal need exists to tap these same economies of scale to extend the useful lives of older defense systems in a cost-effective manner. Upgrading a processor-based component of a defense system involves both hardware and software migration tasks. The software migration task typically requires the translation of assembly-language programs from older complex instruction set computers (CISC) to the native code of the reduced instruction set computers (RISC) used in designs today. Although the migration of hardware is not without its difficulties, it is aided by the fact that CPU speeds and complexities provide tremendous flexibility to hardware designers of today compared with their counterparts of 20 to 30 years ago. However, the translation of assembly-language programs written for proprietary systems of 20+ years ago still presents tremendous difficulties and is often the primary reason why such hardware/software upgrades are not attempted. This paper discusses the software upgrade methodology used to translate the operational flight program (OFF) of the fielded radar data processor (RDP) unit of an advanced radar system aboard a tactical fighter plane. In particular, the paper concentrates on the translation and debugging processes used to re-host the OFF of the RDP onto a new hardware platform designed around the Intel i960 RISC microprocessor architecture View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Detecting the strong scatterers of target with ISAR

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 992 - 995 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB)  

    This paper investigates the problem of detecting the strong scatterers by use of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR). Three methods are proposed. They are maximal average amplitude, minimal entropy and maximal energy. The proposed methods are compared with the existed approach i.e. minimal variance. We carry out the experiment by processing the live data of Boeing-727 aircraft provided by Prof. B.D. Steinberg. The detection results are given graphically. Based on the detected strongest scatterer of target, we perform the phase compensation of ISAR by the scatterer reference method. The reconstructed image of Boeing-727 is also shown View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Real time aircraft simulation using J-MASS

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 766 - 771 vol.2
    Cited by:  Patents (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (492 KB)  

    McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) has developed a six degree-of-freedom (DOF) aircraft model that is suitable for use at various levels of simulation, from manned to interactive to all digital. The model is based on the performance of the aircraft being simulated and is used for development of flying qualities criteria or for existing simulations where high angle of attack, take-off's and landings are not required. The model is ideal for use in air combat studies where the exact performance of the model is known and real time operation is required (20 Hertz update rate). The original aircraft model was written in FORTRAN and is still in use. When a manned simulation is not needed, digital pilot logic provides stick and throttle inputs to the model. Available maneuvers include lever flight, sustained turns, waypoint following and others. This model has been rewritten in Ada and re-engineered to add additional capabilities. The model has become more object oriented, and still updates in real-time. In addition, an Ada interface has been added to the model so it is compliant with the Joint Modeling and Simulation System (J-MASS) View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Metaprogramming in digital simulation

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 659 - 663 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB)  

    This paper describes the use of metaprogramming in Prolog to construct digital logic-simulators which adapt themselves for efficiency to the structure of the circuits they simulate. To test the utility of the metaprogramming approach to simulation, in a simple but representative domain, a logic-simulator was written for TTL integrated circuits. The simulator accepts a wiring-list, from which it creates, loads, and executes a Prolog rule which is both (a) a representation of the user's circuit at the level of gates, adders, counters, etc., and (b) a procedure for its simulation. This rule, which expresses the structure of the circuit by means of Clocksin's definitional format, is an example of “executable data”; there is no distinction in Prolog, that is, between executable code and data. The ordering of goals in this rule guarantees that signals are traced through the circuit with no backtracking; thus the time to execute a simulation-cycle is minimized View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • On civilian or other applications of a disposable, remote chemical sensor network

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 956 - 962 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (580 KB)  

    This paper addresses system engineering and mission planning issues for a disposable, remote chemical sensor network. This network will interconnect a satellite hub, LEO satellites, remote sensors, and fiber optic communication operations. Engineering considerations include orbital analysis, telemetry, satellite transponder access, modulation techniques, power for remotes, a frequency plan, antennae selection and verification that performance is feasible and acceptable via link budgets View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Long haul participation in a distributed interactive simulation demonstration

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 810 - 816 vol.2
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (656 KB)  

    The Avionics Directorate at Wright Laboratory provided the simulation of a F-15E aircraft in the 1994 Interservice/Industry Training Systems and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) demonstrations. The purpose of DIS is to allow dissimilar simulators distributed over a large geographic area to interact in a team environment for the purposes of training, equipment development, and equipment evaluation. I/ITSEC provides a forum for testing DIS concepts. The Integrated Test Bed (ITB) was made DIS compatible for the demonstrations. The ITB is a real-time avionics hot bench used to develop core avionics such as buses, processors, operating systems, and application software. An F-15E aero model is used to stimulate the avionics. The current core avionics suite, a PAVE Pillar derivative, was used to support multiple demonstrations. The DIS software was written in Ada and was integrated onto the ITB model set. The software was partitioned to provide input/output services, dead reckoning of the ITB, truth maintenance of the other players, and weapons. There were two methods used to connect the ITB to I/ITSEC. The Defense Simulation Internet (DSI) was connected to through a node at AFIT, which provided T1 bandwidth. Also, an Ethernet bridge was used with telephone lines to provide 56 Kbs bandwidth. The ITB participated in five I/ITSEC mini-demonstrations. The ITB flew air-to-ground missions, dropping bombs in four demonstrations and delivered a glide bomb in the fifth. Also, the ITB flew against a Surface to Air Missile (SAM) site provided by Amherst Systems. This paper will discuss, the use of DIS for hardware-in-the-loop evaluation, making an existing simulation DIS compatible, participating in a demonstration long haul, and the performance of the DIS software and the communication links View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Higher radix recoded arithmetic using optoelectronic symbolic substitution

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 899 - 906 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (500 KB)  

    A simple parallel optical computing technique using recoded quaternary signed-digit arithmetic is presented in this paper. A shared content-addressable memory based optical implementation employing a fixed number of minterms for any operand length is suggested View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Task allocation in distributed computer systems through an AI planner solver

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 610 - 616 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (492 KB)  

    Many avionics systems use specialized parallel architectures to speed processing and to increase system reliability. The software used therein is frequently divided into tasks and executed concurrently on multiple processors under strict real-time constraints critical to the mission's successful performance. Scheduling and planning are needed for effectively managing the computational resources on such avionics architectures. Since most real-time scheduling problems are known to be NP-hard, an approximation approach that applies heuristic methods using conventional computer algorithms has been used to solve these scheduling problems. Artificial intelligence (AI) planners have been used extensively in manufacturing scheduling and operations research. In this paper, we demonstrate the idea of using AI planners to perform scheduling through an example. We derive a solution to scheduling several image tasks on a distributed computer system, using the AI planner PRODIGY. The basic characteristics of AI planners in general and the PRODIGY solver in particular are described, the domain theory and problem specification for our problem through the PRODIGY description language PDL are presented View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Information engineering: a balanced approach to information systems requirements analysis and design

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 672 - 679 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (720 KB)  

    Over the last decade information engineering has become the methodology of choice for developing information systems. There are as many definitions of information engineering as then are practitioners of the techniques. This paper addresses information engineering from a practical perspective; it discusses how information engineering techniques can be applied to the real-life problem of identifying system requirements and satisfying those requirements with a computer-based information system. The paper also shows that information engineering rather than being a new methodology, is made up of components of existing methodologies View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A transformation of unit vectors to simplify derivations between Earth-centered and local North-East-and-up on an ellipsoid Earth

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 745 - 747 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB)  

    A transformation of unit vectors between Cartesian earth centered and local north, east, and up coordinates is presented to simplify derivations on an ellipsoid Earth. The unit vector relationships an used to simplify the derivation of a transformation for sending track files from a sensor platform (latitude, longitude) with local Cartesian coordinates (Xs-East, Ys-North, Zs-Up) to a receiving platform (latitude', longitude') with local Cartesian coordinates (Xr-East, Yr-North, Zr-Up). Zero altitude for both coordinate systems is taken to be sea level. Tracks may be ballistic, air, surface and/or subsurface View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.