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Robotics & Automation Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date June 2013

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 35
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Editorial Board

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 2
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  • Moving Toward a Multimedia Magazine [From the Editor's Desk]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 4
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  • RAS Member Survey [President's Message]

    Publication Year: 2013
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  • The DARPA Robotics Challenge [Competitions]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 10 - 12
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  • Robotics and Automation Activities in Brazil [IAB]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 14 - 16
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  • Embedded ROS [ROS Topics]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 17 - 19
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  • IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Technical Committee on Agricultural Robotics and Automation [TC Spotlight]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 20 - 125
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  • Robotic Adventure Across the Pacific: 313 Days, 17,486 Nautical km, One Cyclone, Millions of Data Points

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 24 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5267 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With access to the open source Liquid Robotics Pacific Crossing (PacX) data, scientists will be able to conduct research into some of the world's most challenging ocean issues, ranging from measuring the ocean's health and respiration to studying the ocean's biomass-the most fundamental organisms critical to ocean life. View full abstract»

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  • An Attraction Toward Engineering Careers: The Story of a Brooklyn Outreach Program for KuFFFD12 Students

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 31 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1999 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article narrates the development, organization, and execution of a robotics-based outreach program designed to ignite K-12 students' interests in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and attract them toward engineering careers. View full abstract»

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  • GPU-Mapping: Robotic Map Building with Graphical Multiprocessors

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 40 - 51
    Multimedia
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2349 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article provides a broad perspective of the potential applicability of graphical processing units (GPUs) computing power in robotics, specifically in the well-known problem of two-dimensional (2-D) robotic mapping. There are three possible ways of exploiting these massively parallel devices: 1) parallelizing existing algorithms, 2) integrating already existing parallelized general purpose software, and 3) use of its high-computational capabilities in the inception of new algorithms. This article presents examples for all three options: parallelizing a popular implementation of the gridmapping algorithm, using a GPU open-source linear sparse system solver to address the problem of linear least squares graph minimization, and developing a novel method that can be efficiently parallelized and executed in a GPU for handling overlapping grid maps in a mapping with local maps algorithm. Large speedups are shown in the experiments, highlighting the importance of this technology in robotic software development in the near future, as is already the case in many other areas. View full abstract»

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  • Testing Multirobot Algorithms: SAETTA: A Small and Cheap Mobile Unit

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 52 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2288 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A rather new and interesting research field in mobile robotics investigates the cooperation of several units and, in particular, the possibility of obtaining a collaborative behavior by decentralized algorithms. Indeed, decentralized algorithms show definite advantages over centralized ones. They are naturally resilient to one-point failure (the loss of one unit), can easily reconfigure themselves, and don?t require a leader in the team. Moreover, they can exploit the increase of computing power that can be achieved by parallelizing the activities. At the same time, the number and length of interrobot communications can be kept smaller than those necessary for centralized activities. View full abstract»

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  • NIST and IEEE Challenge for MagPieR: The Fastest Mobile Microrobots in the World

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 63 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1132 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Recent advances in micro/nanotechnologies and microelectromechanical systems have enabled micromachined mobile agents. Highly dynamic mobile microrobots are believed to open the gate for various future applications. However, at the submillimeter scale, the adhesion effects dominate physics, especially in the air environment. Although many studies have been performed to avoid or reduce this effect, the sticking phenomena are still one of the biggest challenges in achieving highly dynamic micromobile robots. Subsequently, intrinsic challenges at the given scale (hundreds of micrometers) are the powering technique themselves. Although often designed from active materials, actuation may only be performed by means of various external fields that often require a lot of space around the scene. In this context, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the IEEE initiated an annual state-of-the art microrobotics challenge, boosting the development of novel mobile agents with precise and highly dynamic propulsion mechanisms and controllability. During our first participation in this competition in 2010, the French team Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) proposed a magnetic and piezoelectric mobile microrobot called MagPieR, which dramatically enhanced the propulsion speed to 28 ms for the so-called 2-mm dash task. It literally cut the former record to a quarter. In the meantime, during the 2011 challenge, MagPieR won the mobility challenge thanks to some optimized coil setup and control law. The continuous technical advances in terms of dynamic performance are now shifting, and the focus of the next challenge is more agile-demanding and controllable tasks. Combining different physical effects is a promising key for the future of highly dynamic mobile microsystems and associated applications in micromanipulation, microassembly, or minimally invasive surgery. View full abstract»

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  • Humanoids Grow a Spine: The Effect of Lateral Spinal Motion on the Mechanical Energy Efficiency

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 71 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2959 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the energy efficiency of bipedal walking robots. However, there has been no study of the effect of the spine on the overall energy consumption of robots during locomotion. This article investigates the energy efficiency of a simulated biped humanoid robot that is capable of walking with spinal motion. A systematic technique is presented to compare the energy efficiency of a robot walking with different styles of spinal movement. Simulation results show that with the additional degrees of freedom (DoF) in the torso, the humanoid robot requires 26.5% less energy than its conventional rigid-torso counterpart to complete the same walking task. Interestingly, this happens when the robot is walking with swaying hips. View full abstract»

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  • Robot Tactile Sensing: Gold Nanocomposites As Highly Sensitive Real-Time Optical Pressure Sensors

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 82 - 90
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2583 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article, we propose a new class of optical pressure sensors suitable for robot tactile sensing. These sensors are based on a tapered optical fiber (where optical signals travel) embedded onto a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)- gold nanocomposite material (GNM). By applying different pressure forces to the PDMS-based nanocomposite, we measure in real time the change of optical transmittivity due to the coupling between the GNM and tapered fiber region. The intensity reduction of the transmitted light intensity is correlated with the magnitude of the pressure force. View full abstract»

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  • Geometric Relations Between Rigid Bodies (Part 2): From Semantics to Software

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 91 - 102
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (906 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Rigid bodies are essential primitives in the modeling of robotic devices, tasks, and perception. Basic geometric relations between rigid bodies include relative position, orientation, pose, linear velocity, angular velocity, twist, force, torque, and wrench. In Part 1 of this tutorial [3], we explicitly stated the semantics of all coordinate-invariant properties and operations, and, more importantly, all the choices that are made in coordinate representations of these geometric relations. This resulted in a set of concrete suggestions for standardizing terminology and notation. View full abstract»

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  • Future of women in engineering [Women in Engineering]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 103 - 105
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  • Towards Service Robots for Everyday Environments: Recent Advances in Designing Service Robots for Complex Tasks in Everyday Environments (E. Prassler et al.; 2012) [On the Shelf]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 106
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  • Robotic Tactile Sensing: Technologies and System (Dahiya, R.S. and Valle, M.; 2013) [On the Shelf]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 107
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    Robotic Tactile Sensing: Technologies and System Ravinder S. Dahiya and Maruizio Valle, Springer-Verlag, New York, 2013, 245 Pages. View full abstract»

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  • Society Awards [Society News]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 108 - 109
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  • IEEE RAS Member in the News: Vijay Kumar [Society News]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 109
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  • Distinguished Ambassador [Society News]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 109
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  • Chapter Updates [Society News]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 110
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  • IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Technical Education Programs [Society News]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 111
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine is a unique technology publication which is peer-reviewed, readable and substantive.  The Magazine is a forum for articles which fall between the academic and theoretical orientation of scholarly journals and vendor sponsored trade publications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Eugenio Guglielmelli
Laboratory of Biomedical Robotics
      and Biomicrosystems
Universita' Campus Bio-Medico
      di Roma