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Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2013
Author(s): Dawson, M.
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Bioengineering ;  Components, Circuits, Devices & Systems ;  Computing & Processing ;  Signal Processing & Analysis
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Abstract

On September 2, 1971, the chemist Paul Lauterbur had an idea that would change the practice of medical research. Considering recent research findings about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals to detect tumors in tissue samples, Lauterbur realized that the information from NMR signals could be recovered in the form of images -- and thus obtained noninvasively from a living subject. It was an unexpected epiphany: he was eating a hamburger at the time. Lauterbur rushed out to buy a notebook in which to work out his idea; he completed his notes a few days later. He had discovered the basic method used in all MRI scanners around the world, and for this discovery he would share the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 2003. This book, by Lauterbur's wife and scientific partner, M. Joan Dawson, is the story of Paul Lauterbur's discovery and the subsequent development of the most important medical diagnostic tool since the X-ray.With MRI, Lauterbur had discovered an entirely new principle of imaging. Dawson explains the science behind the discovery and describes Lauterbur's development of the idea, his steadfastness in the face of widespread skepticism and criticism, and related work by other scientists including Peter Mansfield (Lauterbur's Nobel co-recipient), and Raymond Damadian (who famously feuded with Lauterbur over credit for the ideas behind MRI). She offers not only the story of one man's passion for his work but also a case study of how science is actually done: a flash of insight followed by years of painstaking work.

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      Frontmatter

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half title, Title, Copyright, Contents, Foreword, Acknowledgments, Prologue View full abstract»

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      Epiphany in a Hamburger

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: What Is MRI?, Zeugma What?, A Complete Vision, Thunder of Objections View full abstract»

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      Portrait of a Scientist as a Young Man

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Fathers of the Man, Paul the Boy: ¿Thinking about Things People Don't Know about Yet¿, High School: Budding Chemist, Spiritual Shift View full abstract»

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      Study, Work, and War

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: For the Love of Silicon, Why Is Rubber Rubbery?, The Ground Floor of NMR, The War Machine: The NMR Spectrometer View full abstract»

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      Early Breakthroughs

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: ¿My Own PhD Adviser¿, Rose Mary's Story, The Battle of the Technologies, The Jackpot: 13C NMR, Other Fancy Stuff, Big Enough for a Conference, What Next? View full abstract»

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      The 1960s: Stony Brook, Stanford, and Spectrometers

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Berkeley of the East, Studying the Molecules of Life, Sabbatical: Sunshine and Shadow, Losses at Varian, Kivatec, the Hole to Nowhere, Au Revoir, Baby Enron View full abstract»

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      The First Fruitful Weeks

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Turning Signals into Images, The Brookhaven Conference: A Picture of Judy, Those Sure Are Tiny Signals!, Can Big Enough Magnets Be Built?, How to See Contrast When It Isn't Really There, Imaging in Multiple Dimensions, Patenting, The Nature Article, Sunshine of Progress, The World Responds, Where Is the Money?, Meanwhile at Home View full abstract»

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      The Worldwide Laboratory

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Zeugies, Big Red, Experimental Verification, Renaissance Man View full abstract»

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      Baby Grows Up

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Early Images, The Raging Flood, Turf Wars, Leaving Stony Brook, Courtship, About Me, MRI Safety, The Big Old 10 T, April Fool's!, A New Society View full abstract»

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      Among the Corn Fields

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Tale of Three Magnets, The BMRL Family, Twenty Years of Productivity, Surgical Specimens and Microscopic MRI, Metabolic Imaging and Imaging with Limited Data, Interest in Neuroscience, ¿Last Chance, Sisyphus!¿ The 4 T Whole-Body Magnet, Nukin' the BMRL, Honors Rose Up for Him, Physiological MRI, Summary View full abstract»

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      The End and the Beginning

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Stockholm, The Medal, Booting up the Biosphere, And Here a Miracle Happens, The End View full abstract»

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      Epilogue

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      On September 2, 1971, the chemist Paul Lauterbur had an idea that would change the practice of medical research. Considering recent research findings about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals to detect tumors in tissue samples, Lauterbur realized that the information from NMR signals could be recovered in the form of images -- and thus obtained noninvasively from a living subject. It was an unexpected epiphany: he was eating a hamburger at the time. Lauterbur rushed out to buy a notebook in which to work out his idea; he completed his notes a few days later. He had discovered the basic method used in all MRI scanners around the world, and for this discovery he would share the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 2003. This book, by Lauterbur's wife and scientific partner, M. Joan Dawson, is the story of Paul Lauterbur's discovery and the subsequent development of the most important medical diagnostic tool since the X-ray.With MRI, Lauterbur had discovered an entirely new principle of imaging. Dawson explains the science behind the discovery and describes Lauterbur's development of the idea, his steadfastness in the face of widespread skepticism and criticism, and related work by other scientists including Peter Mansfield (Lauterbur's Nobel co-recipient), and Raymond Damadian (who famously feuded with Lauterbur over credit for the ideas behind MRI). She offers not only the story of one man's passion for his work but also a case study of how science is actually done: a flash of insight followed by years of painstaking work. View full abstract»

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      Appendix A: The Notebook, September 1971

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Page 1, Page 2, Page 3, Page 4, Page 5, Page 6 View full abstract»

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      Appendix B: Magnetography, October 1971

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      On September 2, 1971, the chemist Paul Lauterbur had an idea that would change the practice of medical research. Considering recent research findings about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals to detect tumors in tissue samples, Lauterbur realized that the information from NMR signals could be recovered in the form of images -- and thus obtained noninvasively from a living subject. It was an unexpected epiphany: he was eating a hamburger at the time. Lauterbur rushed out to buy a notebook in which to work out his idea; he completed his notes a few days later. He had discovered the basic method used in all MRI scanners around the world, and for this discovery he would share the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 2003. This book, by Lauterbur's wife and scientific partner, M. Joan Dawson, is the story of Paul Lauterbur's discovery and the subsequent development of the most important medical diagnostic tool since the X-ray.With MRI, Lauterbur had discovered an entirely new principle of imaging. Dawson explains the science behind the discovery and describes Lauterbur's development of the idea, his steadfastness in the face of widespread skepticism and criticism, and related work by other scientists including Peter Mansfield (Lauterbur's Nobel co-recipient), and Raymond Damadian (who famously feuded with Lauterbur over credit for the ideas behind MRI). She offers not only the story of one man's passion for his work but also a case study of how science is actually done: a flash of insight followed by years of painstaking work. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Appendix C: Draft Disclosure, August 1972

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      On September 2, 1971, the chemist Paul Lauterbur had an idea that would change the practice of medical research. Considering recent research findings about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals to detect tumors in tissue samples, Lauterbur realized that the information from NMR signals could be recovered in the form of images -- and thus obtained noninvasively from a living subject. It was an unexpected epiphany: he was eating a hamburger at the time. Lauterbur rushed out to buy a notebook in which to work out his idea; he completed his notes a few days later. He had discovered the basic method used in all MRI scanners around the world, and for this discovery he would share the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 2003. This book, by Lauterbur's wife and scientific partner, M. Joan Dawson, is the story of Paul Lauterbur's discovery and the subsequent development of the most important medical diagnostic tool since the X-ray.With MRI, Lauterbur had discovered an entirely new principle of imaging. Dawson explains the science behind the discovery and describes Lauterbur's development of the idea, his steadfastness in the face of widespread skepticism and criticism, and related work by other scientists including Peter Mansfield (Lauterbur's Nobel co-recipient), and Raymond Damadian (who famously feuded with Lauterbur over credit for the ideas behind MRI). She offers not only the story of one man's passion for his work but also a case study of how science is actually done: a flash of insight followed by years of painstaking work. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Notes

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Chapter 3, Chapter 4, Chapter 5, Chapter 6, Chapter 7, Chapter 8, Chapter 9, Chapter 10, Epilogue View full abstract»

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      Index

      Dawson, M.
      Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      On September 2, 1971, the chemist Paul Lauterbur had an idea that would change the practice of medical research. Considering recent research findings about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals to detect tumors in tissue samples, Lauterbur realized that the information from NMR signals could be recovered in the form of images -- and thus obtained noninvasively from a living subject. It was an unexpected epiphany: he was eating a hamburger at the time. Lauterbur rushed out to buy a notebook in which to work out his idea; he completed his notes a few days later. He had discovered the basic method used in all MRI scanners around the world, and for this discovery he would share the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 2003. This book, by Lauterbur's wife and scientific partner, M. Joan Dawson, is the story of Paul Lauterbur's discovery and the subsequent development of the most important medical diagnostic tool since the X-ray.With MRI, Lauterbur had discovered an entirely new principle of imaging. Dawson explains the science behind the discovery and describes Lauterbur's development of the idea, his steadfastness in the face of widespread skepticism and criticism, and related work by other scientists including Peter Mansfield (Lauterbur's Nobel co-recipient), and Raymond Damadian (who famously feuded with Lauterbur over credit for the ideas behind MRI). She offers not only the story of one man's passion for his work but also a case study of how science is actually done: a flash of insight followed by years of painstaking work. View full abstract»