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    RF Passives on Silicon--The Intended and the Unintended

    Burghartz, Joachim N.
    Publication Year: 2008

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    In typical radio-frequency (RF) front-end circuits, the passive components outnumber the active devices. They occupy a major fraction of the total circuit area, and their low quality factor (Q) limits the circuit performance. Furthermore, these (intended) passive components can easily be perturbed by the interconnects feeding into them and coupled together by the (unintended) magnetic fields around those interconnects, or by (unintended) capacitive currents through the silicon substrate. One therefore needs to cope with both the optimization of the passive components, as far as Q and chip area consumption go, and the minimization of the crosstalk effects. This tutorial illustrates the design principles that lead to optimized integrated passive components on the basis of maximum Q and optimum RF isolation. Taking the well-established hybrid RF systems on printed circuit board (PCB) as a reference, the most commonly used passive components are discussed, and RF isolation techniques at chip and package level are explained. View full abstract»

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    Security of Information and Communication Networks Part 2

    Kartalopoulos, Stamatios
    Publication Year: 2010

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    The delivery of private or secret messages has been an issue of concern regardless of method of transport. Since antiquity, it was risky to send a message with a messenger without compromise. As a result, certain methods were developed to assure unintelligibility of a message if in enemy hands or to indicate to the rightful recipient that the message has been compromised or not. In our modern era, most messages and private data are transported over the communications network, which unfortunately is not immune to eavesdroppers, malicious attackers, impersonators and in general to bad actors who, with sophisticated methods access the network and harvest or destroy electronic data. In recent years, government and private industry worldwide are witnessing with concern an alarming increase in such malicious acts that aim to harvest information, destroy or alter files, or impersonate a source.

    In this tutorial we provide a simplified description of Quantum Cryptography (QC), the qubit, the superposition of states, and the polarization of photons, the quantum key distribution (QKD), the BB84 and B92 protocols, the K05 enhanced protocol, the generation of entangled photons and the teleportation phenomenon, and the vulnerabilities of realistic quantum networks. We continue with Chaotic processes and Chaos Cryptography, and we introduce Chaotic Quantum Cryptography. We describe biometrics in communications as part of security and privacy, and we finish up with security of the next generation optical network in which we introduce and describe methods for intrusion detection, countermeasure strategies and also autonomous network counterattack scenarios. View full abstract»

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    Communication Networks:A Concise Introduction

    Walrand, J. ; Parekh, S.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00254ED1V01Y201002CNT004
    Copyright Year: 2010

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    This book results from many years of teaching an upper division course on communication networks in the EECS department at University of California, Berkeley. It is motivated by the perceived need for an easily accessible textbook that puts emphasis on the core concepts behind current and next generation networks. After an overview of how today's Internet works and a discussion of the main principles behind its architecture, we discuss the key ideas behind Ethernet, WiFi networks, routing, internetworking and TCP. To make the book as self contained as possible, brief discussions of probability and Markov chain concepts are included in the appendices. This is followed by a brief discussion of mathematical models that provide insight into the operations of network protocols. Next, the main ideas behind the new generation of wireless networks based on WiMAX and LTE, and the notion of QoS are presented. A concise discussion of the physical layer technologies underlying various networks i also included. Finally, a sampling of topics is presented that may have significant influence on the future evolution of networks including overlay networks like content delivery and peer-to-peer networks, sensor networks, distributed algorithms, Byzantine agreement and source compression. Table of Contents: The Internet / Principles / Ethernet / WiFi / Routing / Internetworking / Transport / Models / WiMAX & LTE / QOS / Physical Layer / Additional Topics View full abstract»

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    Introduction to Statistical Variation and Techniques for Design Optimization

    Rohrer, Norman
    Publication Year: 2007

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    Variability is a reality in nanometer semiconductor processes. This course will cover the sources of systematic and random variations of transistors and their surrounding interconnects. Included in the variability discussion will be withinchip variability, across-wafer variability, across-device variability, and device mismatch. The resulting impact upon an individual circuit?s functionality and timing will be explored. Analytical approaches will be shown for examining the variability?s impact upon leakage power, dynamic power, and circuit functionality of static and dynamic circuits, SRAM arrays, and PLLs. Techniques will include Monte-Carlo analysis, vector analysis, and statistical timing analysis. View full abstract»

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    Modeling Digital Switching Circuits with Linear Algebra

    Thornton, M.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00579ED1V01Y201404DCS044
    Copyright Year: 2014

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    Modeling Digital Switching Circuits with Linear Algebra describes an approach for modeling digital information and circuitry that is an alternative to Boolean algebra. While the Boolean algebraic model has been wildly successful and is responsible for many advances in modern information technology, the approach described in this book offers new insight and different ways of solving problems. Modeling the bit as a vector instead of a scalar value in the set {0, 1} allows digital circuits to be characterized with transfer functions in the form of a linear transformation matrix. The use of transfer functions is ubiquitous in many areas of engineering and their rich background in linear systems theory and signal processing is easily applied to digital switching circuits with this model. The common tasks of circuit simulation and justification are specific examples of the application of the linear algebraic model and are described in detail. The advantages offered by the new model as compa ed to traditional methods are emphasized throughout the book. Furthermore, the new approach is easily generalized to other types of information processing circuits such as those based upon multiple-valued or quantum logic; thus providing a unifying mathematical framework common to each of these areas. Modeling Digital Switching Circuits with Linear Algebra provides a blend of theoretical concepts and practical issues involved in implementing the method for circuit design tasks. Data structures are described and are shown to not require any more resources for representing the underlying matrices and vectors than those currently used in modern electronic design automation (EDA) tools based on the Boolean model. Algorithms are described that perform simulation, justification, and other common EDA tasks in an efficient manner that are competitive with conventional design tools. The linear algebraic model can be used to implement common EDA tasks directly upon a structural netlist thus avo ding the intermediate step of transforming a circuit description into a representation of a set of switching functions as is commonly the case when conventional Boolean techniques are used. Implementation results are provided that empirically demonstrate the practicality of the linear algebraic model. View full abstract»

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    Usable Security:History, Themes, and Challenges

    Garfinkel, S. ; Lipford, H.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00594ED1V01Y201408SPT011
    Copyright Year: 2014

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    There has been roughly 15 years of research into approaches for aligning research in Human Computer Interaction with computer Security, more colloquially known as ``usable security.'' Although usability and security were once thought to be inherently antagonistic, today there is wide consensus that systems that are not usable will inevitably suffer security failures when they are deployed into the real world. Only by simultaneously addressing both usability and security concerns will we be able to build systems that are truly secure. This book presents the historical context of the work to date on usable security and privacy, creates a taxonomy for organizing that work, outlines current research objectives, presents lessons learned, and makes suggestions for future research. View full abstract»

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    Block Transceivers:OFDM and Beyond

    Diniz, P. ; Martins, W. ; Lima, M.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00424ED1V01Y201206COM007
    Copyright Year: 2012

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    The demand for data traffic over mobile communication networks has substantially increased during the last decade. As a result, these mobile broadband devices spend the available spectrum fiercely, requiring the search for new technologies. In transmissions where the channel presents a frequency-selective behavior, multicarrier modulation (MCM) schemes have proven to be more efficient, in terms of spectral usage, than conventional modulations and spread spectrum techniques. The orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is the most popular MCM method, since it not only increases spectral efficiency but also yields simple transceivers. All OFDM-based systems, including the single-carrier with frequency-division equalization (SC-FD), transmit redundancy in order to cope with the problem of interference among symbols. This book presents OFDM-inspired systems that are able to, at most, halve the amount of redundancy used by OFDM systems while keeping the computational complexity co parable. Such systems, herein called memoryless linear time-invariant (LTI) transceivers with reduced redundancy, require low-complexity arithmetical operations and fast algorithms. In addition, whenever the block transmitter and receiver have memory and/or are linear time-varying (LTV), it is possible to reduce the redundancy in the transmission even further, as also discussed in this book. For the transceivers with memory it is possible to eliminate the redundancy at the cost of making the channel equalization more difficult. Moreover, when time-varying block transceivers are also employed, then the amount of redundancy can be as low as a single symbol per block, regardless of the size of the channel memory. With the techniques presented in the book it is possible to address what lies beyond the use of OFDM-related solutions in broadband transmissions. Table of Contents: The Big Picture / Transmultiplexers / OFDM / Memoryless LTI Transceivers with Reduced Redundancy / FIR LTV Transc ivers with Reduced Redundancy View full abstract»

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    Introduction to Fiber Optics

    Jacobs, Ira
    Publication Year: 2005

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    This course provides an overview of fiber optic communications technology and applications. It assumes some general technical background in telecommunications, but no prior knowledge of fiber optics. The basic components of an optical fiber communication system include the transmitter (laser and LED), the fiber (multimode, single mode, dispersion-shifted) and the receiver (PIN and APD detectors, coherent detectors, optical preamplifiers, receiver electronics). These technologies are defined, their basic operating principles summarized, key parameters affecting system performance identified, and representative values given for both practical systems and current research results. Factors affecting application (both point-to-point and networking) are identified. Emphasis is on physical principles, performance limits, and technology and application directions. View full abstract»

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    Ultra-Wideband Radio Technology Course and IEEE Standards Bundle

    Siwiak, Kai
    Publication Year: 2012

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    This tutorial traces UWB technology through history, regulations, standards, system implementations and commercial applications. Methods of generating and modulating UWB signals are described and set in the context of UWB proposals for IEEE802 Standards. UWB antenna, radiation, and propagation phenomena, including unique behavior in multipath are presented in contrast with narrow band radio. Examples of UWB link margins including data throughput versus range and system data capacity (up to 2 Gb/s) are compared with conventional and much higher power 802.11a/b systems. The future of UWB is a mix of wireless communications, precision positioning and radar. UWB can enable an accurate indoor adjunct to GPS with centimeter accuracy. Discussions of applications show that UWB capabilities make possible delivery of location-specific content and information, tracking of high value assets, security systems and various automotive and interesting home based "location awareness" systems.

    The following IEEE standards are included in this package:
    802-2001 IEEE Standard for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks: Overview and Architecture
    802-15.3-2003 IEEE Standard for Information Technology- Telecommunications and Information Exchange Between Systems - Local and Metropolitan Area Networks - Specific Requirements - Part 15.3: Wireless Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY)
    802.15.4-2011 IEEE Standard for Local and metropolitan area networks--Part 15.4: Low-Rate Wireless Personal Area Networks (LR-WPANs) View full abstract»

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    Network Games:Theory, Models, and Dynamics

    Ozdaglar, A. ; Menache, I.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00330ED1V01Y201101CNT009
    Copyright Year: 2011

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    Traditional network optimization focuses on a single control objective in a network populated by obedient users and limited dispersion of information. However, most of today's networks are large-scale with lack of access to centralized information, consist of users with diverse requirements, and are subject to dynamic changes. These factors naturally motivate a new distributed control paradigm, where the network infrastructure is kept simple and the network control functions are delegated to individual agents which make their decisions independently ("selfishly"). The interaction of multiple independent decision-makers necessitates the use of game theory, including economic notions related to markets and incentives. This monograph studies game theoretic models of resource allocation among selfish agents in networks. The first part of the monograph introduces fundamental game theoretic topics. Emphasis is given to the analysis of dynamics in game theoretic situations, which is crucial for design and control of networked systems. The second part of the monograph applies the game theoretic tools for the analysis of resource allocation in communication networks. We set up a general model of routing in wireline networks, emphasizing the congestion problems caused by delay and packet loss. In particular, we develop a systematic approach to characterizing the inefficiencies of network equilibria, and highlight the effect of autonomous service providers on network performance. We then turn to examining distributed power control in wireless networks. We show that the resulting Nash equilibria can be efficient if the degree of freedom given to end-users is properly designed. Table of Contents: Static Games and Solution Concepts / Game Theory Dynamics / Wireline Network Games / Wireless Network Games / Future Perspectives View full abstract»

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    Tunable Semiconductor Lasers

    Buus, Jens
    Publication Year: 2006

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    This course describes the state-of-the-art of tunable lasers, tunable laser technologies and control of tunable lasers. It also includes a brief introduction to the basics of semiconductor lasers, as well as background on DFB lasers, in particular how a grating works as a wavelength selective element in DFB and DBR lasers. Tuning mechanisms and tuning properties will be described, and the operation of modified structures with extended tuning range will be explained, including sampled gratings and super structure gratings. The properties of codirectional couplers and the use of these in tunable lasers will be discussed. Devices such as external cavity lasers, wavelength selectable lasers, and tunable VCSELs, will also be described. Throughout the course numerous examples of laser structures from the recent technical literature will be presented. Practical issues such as characterization, operation, and control of tunable lasers, as well as switching speed and reliability, will be included. View full abstract»

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    Fundamentals of LTE Standards and Technologies

    Wang, Elva ; Chan, Peter
    Publication Year: 2010

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    In this tutorial, you will learn about LTE air-interface standards and technologies. After completing this tutorial, you should have obtained a high level understanding of LTE, knowing its technical features, key advanced technologies, frame structure and resource grid. Both downlink and uplink transmissions will be addressed. For downlink, we will discuss OFDMA modulation, the physical channels and their general processing, the physical signals and MBSFN. We will also highlight the MIMO technologies in downlink, which includes SIMO, transmit diversity, spatial multiplexing and multiuser MIMO.

    In uplink, we will introduce the key feature of LTE, SC-FDMA, which is a technology that strikes a balance between low peak-to-average-power-ratio and the advantages of OFDMA. WE will also cover the physical channels and their processing and physical signals. We will introduce the possible use of uplink multiuser MIMO, which is a a technology transparent to the UEs and achieve significant increase in the system throughput. Finally, cell search and random access are covered. View full abstract»

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    Shared-Memory Synchronization

    Scott, M.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00506ED1V01Y201305AIM021
    Copyright Year: 2013

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    From driving, flying, and swimming, to digging for unknown objects in space exploration, autonomous robots take on varied shapes and sizes. In part, autonomous robots are designed to perform tasks that are too dirty, dull, or dangerous for humans. With nontrivial autonomy and volition, they may soon claim their own place in human society. These robots will be our allies as we strive for understanding our natural and man-made environments and build positive synergies around us. Although we may never perfect replication of biological capabilities in robots, we must harness the inevitable emergence of robots that synchronizes with our own capacities to live, learn, and grow. This book is a snapshot of motivations and methodologies for our collective attempts to transform our lives and enable us to cohabit with robots that work with and for us. It reviews and guides the reader to seminal and continual developments that are the foundations for successful paradigms. It attempts to demystify the abilities and limitations of robots. It is a progress report on the continuing work that will fuel future endeavors. Table of Contents: Part I: Preliminaries/Agency, Motion, and Anatomy/Behaviors / Architectures / Affect/Sensors / Manipulators/Part II: Mobility/Potential Fields/Roadmaps / Reactive Navigation / Multi-Robot Mapping: Brick and Mortar Strategy / Part III: State of the Art / Multi-Robotics Phenomena / Human-Robot Interaction / Fuzzy Control / Decision Theory and Game Theory / Part IV: On the Horizon / Applications: Macro and Micro Robots / References / Author Biography / Discussion View full abstract»

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    Design of Electrically Small Antennas

    Best, Steven
    Publication Year: 2009

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    As today's ubiquitous wireless devices decrease in size, there is an increasing demand for physically smaller antennas, yet the performance requirements are rarely relaxed. Optimizing the performance properties of electrically small antennas represents a significant design challenge for the antenna engineer. This course provides a discussion on the fundamental theory, challenges and performance trade-offs associated with the design of electrically small antennas. The course begins with a brief overview of the basic theory and concepts associated with electrically small antennas. This segment of the presentation provides an understanding of antenna performance limitations in terms of impedance, radiation patterns, bandwidth, efficiency, and quality factor. Techniques used to design self-resonant electrically small antennas are described and compared. These include dielectric loading, linear loading (increasing wire length), top-loading, and "folded" configurations. The relationship between the antenna┬┐s performance characteristics and its physical properties is discussed. Issues such as the significance of antenna geometry are considered. The performance of the small antenna on small finite ground planes is considered with a particular emphasis on how the antenna┬┐s location on the ground plane affects impedance, pattern and polarization properties. The lecture concludes with a discussion on recent advances made in the design of low profile, conformal and integrated device antennas. View full abstract»

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    Network Simulation

    Fujimoto, R. ; Perumalla, K. ; Riley, G.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00046ED1V01Y200609CNT001
    Copyright Year: 2006

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    A detailed introduction to the design, implementation, and use of network simulation tools is presented. The requirements and issues faced in the design of simulators for wired and wireless networks are discussed. Abstractions such as packet- and fluid-level network models are covered. Several existing simulations are given as examples, with details and rationales regarding design decisions presented. Issues regarding performance and scalability are discussed in detail, describing how one can utilize distributed simulation methods to increase the scale and performance of a simulation environment. Finally, a case study of two simulation tools is presented that have been developed using distributed simulation techniques. This text is essential to any student, researcher, or network architect desiring a detailed understanding of how network simulation tools are designed, implemented, and used. View full abstract»

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    Basic Simulation Models of Phase Tracking Devices Using MATLAB

    Tranter, W. ; Thamvichai, R. ; Bose, T.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00245ED1V01Y201009COM005
    Copyright Year: 2010

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    The Phase-Locked Loop (PLL), and many of the devices used for frequency and phase tracking, carrier and symbol synchronization, demodulation, and frequency synthesis, are fundamental building blocks in today's complex communications systems. It is therefore essential for both students and practicing communications engineers interested in the design and implementation of modern communication systems to understand and have insight into the behavior of these important and ubiquitous devices. Since the PLL behaves as a nonlinear device (at least during acquisition), computer simulation can be used to great advantage in gaining insight into the behavior of the PLL and the devices derived from the PLL. The purpose of this Synthesis Lecture is to provide basic theoretical analyses of the PLL and devices derived from the PLL and simulation models suitable for supplementing undergraduate and graduate courses in communications. The Synthesis Lecture is also suitable for self study by practicin engineers. A significant component of this book is a set of basic MATLAB-based simulations that illustrate the operating characteristics of PLL-based devices and enable the reader to investigate the impact of varying system parameters. Rather than providing a comprehensive treatment of the underlying theory of phase-locked loops, theoretical analyses are provided in sufficient detail in order to explain how simulations are developed. The references point to sources currently available that treat this subject in considerable technical depth and are suitable for additional study. Download MATLAB codes (.zip) Table of Contents: Introduction / Basic PLL Theory / Structures Developed From The Basic PLL / Simulation Models / MATLAB Simulations / Noise Performance Analysis View full abstract»

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    Near Field Communication:Recent Developments and Library Implications

    McHugh, S. ; Yarmey, K.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00570ED1V01Y201403ETL002
    Copyright Year: 2014

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    Near Field Communication is a radio frequency technology that allows objects, such as mobile phones, computers, tags, or posters, to exchange information wirelessly across a small distance. This report on the progress of Near Field Communication reviews the features and functionality of the technology and summarizes the broad spectrum of its current and anticipated applications. We explore the development of NFC technology in recent years, introduce the major stakeholders in the NFC ecosystem, and project its movement toward mainstream adoption. Several examples of early implementation of NFC in libraries are highlighted, primarily involving the use of NFC to enhance discovery by linking books or other physical objects with digital information about library resources, but also including applications of NFC to collection management and self-checkout. Future uses of NFC in libraries, such as smart posters or other enhanced outreach, are envisioned as well as the potential for the "touch paradigm" and "Internet of things" to transform the ways in which library users interact with the information environment. Conscious of the privacy and security of our patrons, we also address continuing concerns related to NFC technology and its expected applications, recommending caution, awareness, and education as immediate next steps for librarians. View full abstract»

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    Multi-Path Receivers Architectures for Wideband Multi-Standard Radios

    Hoyos, Sebastian
    Publication Year: 2010

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    This tutorial will present multi-path receivers architectures as a potential candidate for the design of software-defined receivers. These receivers parallelize the front-end by expanding the RF input signal. This expansion requires multiple paths, and parallel sampling at the end of the integration time provides a set of coefficients that become the digital representation of the signal. Each parallel path comprises of a switched gm-C filter structure that is modified to combine mixing with a base function, windowing and integration. Due to parallel digital signal processing, each path operates only on a fraction of the signal bandwidth, thus relaxing the tracking bandwidth requirements and minimizing the power consumption of each sampling path. Further, the lower speeds provide robustness to jitter in the sampling clocks, which otherwise can impose a major limitation in achieving high dynamic range. This topology enables the realization of a Software-defined radio multi-standard receiver that not only works for narrowband standards like GSM and Bluetooth, but also for wideband standards like Wimax and Wi-Fi and very wideband standards like ultrawideband. View full abstract»

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    RF Filters in Next Generation Cellular Radio Systems

    Ali-Ahmad, Walid
    Publication Year: 2005

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    This tutorial provides an overview of the different requirements for RF filters in next generation multi-band multi-standard radio platforms. It also presents the required RF filter characteristics in relation to 3G radio performance parameters and system requirements. View full abstract»

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    Web Corpus Construction

    Schafer, R. ; Bildhauer, F.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00508ED1V01Y201305HLT022
    Copyright Year: 2013

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    The World Wide Web constitutes the largest existing source of texts written in a great variety of languages. A feasible and sound way of exploiting this data for linguistic research is to compile a static corpus for a given language. There are several adavantages of this approach: (i) Working with such corpora obviates the problems encountered when using Internet search engines in quantitative linguistic research (such as non-transparent ranking algorithms). (ii) Creating a corpus from web data is virtually free. (iii) The size of corpora compiled from the WWW may exceed by several orders of magnitudes the size of language resources offered elsewhere. (iv) The data is locally available to the user, and it can be linguistically post-processed and queried with the tools preferred by her/him. This book addresses the main practical tasks in the creation of web corpora up to giga-token size. Among these tasks are the sampling process (i.e., web crawling) and the usual cleanups including bo lerplate removal and removal of duplicated content. Linguistic processing and problems with linguistic processing coming from the different kinds of noise in web corpora are also covered. Finally, the authors show how web corpora can be evaluated and compared to other corpora (such as traditionally compiled corpora). For additional material please visit the companion website: sites.morganclaypool.com/wcc Table of Contents: Preface / Acknowledgments / Web Corpora / Data Collection / Post-Processing / Linguistic Processing / Corpus Evaluation and Comparison / Bibliography / Authors' Biographies View full abstract»

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    Children’s Internet Search:Using Roles to Understand Children’s Search Behavior

    Foss, E. ; Druin, A.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00591ED1V01Y201408ICR034
    Copyright Year: 2014

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    Searching the Internet and the ability to competently use search engines are increasingly becoming an important part of children’s daily lives. Whether mobile or at home, children use search interfaces to explore personal interests, complete academic assignments, and have social interaction. However, engaging with search also means engaging with an ever-changing and evolving search landscape. There are continual software updates, multiple devices used to search (e.g., phones, tablets), an increasing use of social media, and constantly updated Internet content. For young searchers, this can require infinite adaptability or mean being hopelessly confused. This book offers a perspective centered on children’s search experiences as a whole instead of thinking of search as a process with separate and potentially problematic steps. Reading the prior literature with a child-centered view of search reveals that children have been remarkably consistent over time as searchers, dis laying the same search strategies regardless of the landscape of search. However, no research has synthesized these consistent patterns in children’s search across the literature, and only recently have these patterns been uncovered as distinct search roles, or searcher types. Based on a four-year longitudinal study on children’s search experiences, this book weaves together the disparate evidence in the literature through the use of 9 search roles for children ages 7-15. The search role framework has a distinct advantage because it encourages adult stakeholders to design children’s search tools to support and educate children at their existing levels of search strength and deficit, rather than expecting children to adapt to a transient search landscape. View full abstract»

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    Mechanical Testing for the Biomechanics Engineer:A Practical Guide

    Saunders, M.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00616ED1V01Y201411BME054
    Copyright Year: 2014

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    Mechanical testing is a useful tool in the field of biomechanics. Classic biomechanics employs mechanical testing for a variety of purposes. For instance, testing may be used to determine the mechanical properties of bone under a variety of loading modes and various conditions including age and disease state. In addition, testing may be used to assess fracture fixation procedures to justify clinical approaches. Mechanical testing may also be used to test implants and biomaterials to determine mechanical strength and appropriateness for clinical purposes. While the information from a mechanical test will vary, there are basics that need to be understood to properly conduct mechanical testing. This book will attempt to provide the reader not only with the basic theory of conducting mechanical testing, but will also focus on providing practical insights and examples. Table of Contents: Preface / Fundamentals / Accuracy and Measurement Tools / Design / Testing Machine Design and Fabricati n / Fixture Design and Applications / Additional Considerations in a Biomechanics Test / Laboratory Examples and Additional Equations / Appendices: Practical Orthopedic Biomechanics Problems / Bibliography / Author Biography View full abstract»

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    Wireless-LAN Radio Design

    Behzad, Arya
    Publication Year: 2005

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    As one of the few rising stars of the semiconductor industry, WLAN design is engaging more and more engineers and companies. Essential to the overall system design, is the radio design. This tutorial will introduce the various flavors of the 802.11 WLAN PHY standards (A/B/G) and describe their specifications and impact on the radio design. The possible choices for the radio architecture (direct-conversion, low-IF, super-heterodyne) are examined and their impact on the transistor-level design will be studied. The emphasis of this tutorial is on practical aspects of design for wireless LAN radios. After completing this course you should be able to develop an understanding of: What WLAN is; 802.11b/a/g radio requirements and specifications; Radio architectures for WLAN; Impact on cost and power consumption; Choice of process technology; Analog impairments; 802.11 system performance in the presence of analog impairments; Key building blocks and calibration techniques. View full abstract»

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    Design of Phase Locked Loops

    Dayaratna, Lama
    Publication Year: 2009

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    The objective of this course is to provide a state of the art review of phase locked loop circuits and applications from a design and development perspective. Intended for RF and Microwave Engineers, the course details out the design and development of phase locked loop circuits. Topics include PLL basics, VCOs, phase detectors, open and close loop characterization, loop filter design, and phase noise concepts. Examples will be given to a variety of problems relevant to the design of phase locked loops. View full abstract»

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    Advanced Protocols for Wireless Ad-hoc Networks

    Sohrabi, Kathy
    Publication Year: 2006

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    This is a 2-part course. The Advanced Protocols for Wireless Ad-hoc Networks will illustrate that in Ad-Hoc networks where there is no underlying fixed infrastructure, tasks such as network self-organization, mobility management, adaptive route detection for unicast and multicast applications, and provisioning of Gateway functionality to interconnect the ad-hoc network to the rest of the Internet space must be handled according to rules that are unique to the ad-hoc nature of the system. Topics related to support of QoS at various network layers will also be discussed, with emphasis on layers 2, 3, and 4 of the network. We will investigate the performance of these protocols in terms of their level of scalability to different sizes, and traffic loads. Topics of security will also be discussed. View full abstract»

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