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IEE Proceedings A - Physical Science, Measurement and Instrumentation, Management and Education - Reviews

Issue 6 • October 1985

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Historical radar

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):325 - 326
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | PDF file iconPDF (239 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Memories of radar research

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):327 - 339
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1707 KB)

    The paper is a personal account of the author's involvement in radar research from the beginning of 1938 up to the end of the Second World War. First, the paper describes the early research work carried out at the Air Defence Research and Development Establishment (ADRDE), in which the author was involved, on radio direction finding. The paper then describes the Tizard Mission to North America, to... View full abstract»

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  • The work of TRE in the invasion of europe

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):340 - 358
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2825 KB)

    The paper is a composite survey of the work of TRE over a period of three years on radio aids up to the launching of the invasion of Europe. It was written to put on record the way in which ideas and equipments developed so that future Experimental Establishments may benefit from our successes and mistakes. Each Group which was involved has contributed information on its particular work and it is ... View full abstract»

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  • ASV: the detection of surface vessels by airborne radar

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):359 - 384
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4186 KB)

    Radar, both ship-borne and airborne played a vital part in preventing the defeat of Britain in the Battle of the Atlantic. The Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) was responsible for the airborne radar for the RAF and FAA. A detailed account of the work on the airborne detection of surface vessels, starting with the first experiments in 1937, is given in the paper. ASV (aircraft to sur... View full abstract»

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  • The development of centimetre AI

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):385 - 393
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1121 KB)

    The system of interception devised to observe, engage and destroy enemy night bombers is known as ground-controlled interception (GCI). The aircraft involved are fitted with an airborne radar for airborne interception (AI) to help them in intercepting the enemy aircraft. The early Marks of AI used a 1.5 m carrier wavelength and had some problems. The early AI radar sets had a very limited range (l... View full abstract»

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  • Oboe: history and development

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):394 - 398
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (631 KB)

    The paper describes the history and development of the Oboe bombing-guidance system, and its applications. Oboe is a ground-controlled system, and the ground based operators give instructions to the bomber crews. There are several different versions of the equipment, all operating on different wavebands. The paper gives the theory of the system, and the technique of its use in operation. The subse... View full abstract»

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  • H2S and the navigator

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):399 - 400
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (205 KB)

    At the beginning of the Second World War, accurate navigation at night over enemy territory was only possible on moonlit nights. On other nights, when flying through and over cloud and bad visibility, navigation was much more of a hit and miss affair, and a case of hoping that the bombs had been dropped on an enemy target. However, with the arrival of H2S, the navigator's job was made much easier,... View full abstract»

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  • Historical note on H2S

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):401 - 403
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (434 KB)

    In March 1942, the first radar aid to navigation GEE was introduced. However, GEE could be jammed, its range was limited and positional accuracy was not good enough for the needs of the RAF. Against this background H2S was developed, and the paper describes the early research and operational work carried out on the system. View full abstract»

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  • The new H2Ss

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):404 - 410
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1037 KB)

    H2S Marks IV and VI were conceived as aids to blind bombing and navigation for the RAF sorties over Germany. H2S was entirely self contained and did not require any ground tracking stations. Marks IV (X-band) and VI (K-band) are described in the paper, and how they were developed from the earlier Marks of H2S. View full abstract»

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  • History of fighter direction

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):411 - 422
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1944 KB)

    The paper is an account of the work of the Ground Radar Division of TRE following the development of the Chain Home system (CH). It is concerned first with improving air defences against night bombers and low flying aircraft and then, as the war swung in the favour of the British, with radar support for offensive action by the RAF and later by the Allied Armies landing in Europe. It includes a sho... View full abstract»

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  • The radio war

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):423 - 434
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2169 KB)

    The paper records the part played by the Telecommunications Research Establisment (TRE) in the development of the art and technique of radio countermeasures, and to crystallise the experience gained during the Second World War. It does not attempt to deal comprehensively with the whole story, as the contribution of the TRE was only a small part of the whole. The paper describes the use of radio co... View full abstract»

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  • The story of IFF (Identification Friend or Foe)

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):435 - 437
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (333 KB)

    At the beginning of the Second World War, the need for a system for identifying friendly aircraft became very apparent. The system which was developed was known as IFF: identification friend or foe. The development of IFF, from the beginning, and its various forms are described in the paper. The collaboration between the British and Americans later on in the war, to manufacture the Mark V sets, is... View full abstract»

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  • D¿13: some personal memories of 24th¿28th May 1944

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):438 - 440
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (269 KB)

    The paper describes some of the countermeasures preparations made in the weeks before D-Day. A bogus invasion force was devised to fool the enemy, involving the use of radio-jamming techniques. In this period, there was an Intelligence report of a new enemy radar station, which could have put the whole counter-measures operation at risk. The method used and new equipment devised to determine the a... View full abstract»

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  • Development of radar for the Royal Navy 1935¿44

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):441 - 444
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (470 KB)

    The original patent for radar was registered by the Admiralty in 1928. However, it was not until 1935 that the Air Ministry took the initiative to develop radar. Following a meeting at the Air Ministry in March 1935, the Experimental Department of HM Signal School was instructed by the Admiralty, to start work on the development of radar for the Royal Navy. The paper describes the early developmen... View full abstract»

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