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IRE Transactions on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

Issue 2 • June 1959

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  • IRE Transactions on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s): c1
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  • IRE Professional Group on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s): 49
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  • 1959 Pioneer Awards in Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):50 - 56
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  • Introduction

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s): 57
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  • Frontispiece

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s): 58
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  • Editorial

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):59 - 60
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  • Instrument Landing at the National Bureau of Standards

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):61 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    In 1928 commercial aviation in the United States had developed to the point that the urgent need for additional facilities which would permit all-weather flight was evident to everyone. In anticipation of this need, the aircraft industry had undertaken the development of new and more precise aircraft instruments, including the sensitive altimeter, the artificial horizon, and the directional gyro. ... View full abstract»

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  • Operational Flight Testing of Early Instrument Landing Systems

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):67 - 70
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    The development of successful instrument approach and landing involved the solution of not only technical problems, but operational problems as well. A review of methods used to overcome operational problems is made, covering the period from the earliest successful instrument landing to the introduction of instrument approach into routine scheduled operation. Flight techniques are described, using... View full abstract»

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  • Ground-Controlled Approach---Its Development and Early Operational Use

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):71 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1186 KB)

    Ground-Controlled Approach (GCA) was developed to meet military requirements for a "universal" blind-landing system, needing no additional airborne equipment or pilot indoctrination beyond short-range voice radio and basic instrument training. The talk-down principle, previously discredited in favor of beam-approach systems, was proved feasible when accurate information was available. The requirem... View full abstract»

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  • All-Weather Landing

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):75 - 77
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    The development of all-weather landing is reviewed, particularly with regard to automatic control aspects. Flare-out schemes are described as well as experience with various systems. Problems of cross wind and techniques for eliminating their effects are included, along the ¿weather cock¿ technique. Crab-angle elimination and castering cross-wind landing gear methods are touched upon. View full abstract»

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  • A Survey of Instrument Approach Systems in the United States

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):78 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3211 KB)

    A brief history and technical description of instrument landing system (ILS) and precision approach radar (PAR) is given. Improvements in ILS localizer and glide-slope designs are mentioned which reduce adverse site effects and hasten the day when fully automatic approaches may be authorized. Localizer improvements include a highly directional slotted-waveguide antenna. The waveguide system is ess... View full abstract»

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  • Improvements on the Instrument Landing System

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):85 - 94
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    The present paper deals primarily with CAA contribution to the art of instrument landing systems and is confined to the localizer and glide-path portions of the system. It describes briefly the present standard 8-loop localizer used at most sites as well as some modifications made in the basic localizer concept in order to adapt it to locations where siting problems exist. It also describes the st... View full abstract»

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  • Electronic Landing Aids for Carrier Aircraft

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):95 - 99
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (998 KB)

    With no comparable change in landing areas, the landing speed of carrier aircraft has approximately doubled over the past 15 years. For this and other reasons the carrier landing procedure has become a very difficult task for which the aid of automatic electronic devices is sorely needed. Such systems would also greatly improve the continuity of flight operations through periods of poor visibility... View full abstract»

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  • Glide-Slope Antenna Arrays for Use under Adverse Siting Conditions

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):100 - 111
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3282 KB)

    The problems of generation of an adequate glideslope signal on a practical airport site are examined, with particular attention to the path-shape degradation introduced by inadequate smooth surface in the primary reflecting area, and hills and similar mirror obstructions under the approach line. Quality factors are derived to establish comparison standards to evaluate the relative performance to b... View full abstract»

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  • The FAA Philosophy and Program of Instrument Approach and Landing System Development

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):112 - 117
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    An all-weather instrument landing system is urgently required by both civil and military users of the airspace. To this end the Government has pursued several developmental approaches which have contributed significantly to our knowledge and understanding of what steps must now be taken. This article describes much of what has been learned from previous efforts and describes the approach presently... View full abstract»

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  • A Look at the Future of Automatic Landing Systems

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):118 - 128
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Current systems of instrument approach guidance, even with recent and forthcoming improvements, are shown to be inadequate for future operational needs. The potential weaknesses of current techniques include restrictions on flight-control maneuverability, limited landing rates, special terrain and siting requirements, and deterioration of service in the critical low-altitude region near touchdown.... View full abstract»

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  • An Automatic Landing System

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):128 - 135
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    The concept, theory, implementation, and test results of the Bell Aircraft Automatic Landing System are presented. The system, which requires no additional airborne electronics equipment in land-based aircraft carrying an ILAS receiver and coupler, employs a precise ground-based radar and command computer. The major source of error of this closed-loop system is turbulence, while performance is lim... View full abstract»

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  • Regal---An Advanced Approach and Landing System

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):135 - 142
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1864 KB)

    The FAA is developing an advanced approach and landing system called REGAL. Ground-based scanning beams set up a broad reference grid in space from which aircraft may determine their position and optimumly determine the landing maneuver. A breadboard system was designed and tested in 1957 and 1958, and the FAA experimental elevation system will be tested in 1959. Theory of the radar ground-reflect... View full abstract»

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  • The AN/MSN-3: An Automatic Ground-Controlled Approach System

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):142 - 148
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    A system is described whereby information gathered by a standard ground controlled approach (GCA) radar is utilized to compute automatically all GCA approach-control commands; these commands are then transmitted simultaneously to a maximum of six aircraft via the USAF frequency-division digital data link for automatic control of the aircraft approach. The system is designed to enable continuous hu... View full abstract»

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  • PGANE News

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):149 - 150
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s):150 - 153
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  • Institutional listings

    Publication Year: 1959, Page(s): 153a
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1960. The new retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.

Full Aims & Scope