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IEE Colloquium on The 3D Interface for the Information Worker (Digest No. 1998/437)

19 May 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Why `traditional' HCI techniques fail to support desktop VR

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):1/1 - 1/5
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (560 KB)

    The paper argues that `traditional' human computer interaction (HCI) techniques, such as hierarchical task analysis and iterative development, do not support the design of desktop virtual reality (desktop VR). If this problem is not addressed then users will continue to be presented with superficially pleasing but essentially useless applications of this technology View full abstract»

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  • New methodologies and techniques for evaluating user performance in advanced 3D virtual interfaces

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):5/1 - 5/8
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (712 KB)

    The trend in computer interfaces is rapidly moving towards non-physical virtual interfaces. Virtual interfaces are highly interactive and promote a degree of presence or a sense of being in the virtual environment. This means that users should experience a higher situation awareness, particularly where a spatially immersive environment is used. This brings with it exciting possibilities for provid... View full abstract»

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  • IEE Colloquium on 3D Interface for the Information Worker (Digest No.98/437)

    Publication Year: 1998
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (40 KB)

    The following topics are dealt with: 3D interface for the information worker; HCI for desktop VR; 3D interfaces for office applications; virtual environments; and user performance evaluation in 3D virtual interfaces View full abstract»

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  • RealPlaces, 3D interfaces for office applications

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):2/1 - 2/4
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (308 KB)

    Users of business applications first interacted using command lines, then with full-screen character interfaces and now with object oriented graphical user interfaces. At the same time games machines have progressed from Pong to virtual reality. The RealPlaces project set out to investigate the convergence of these two paths View full abstract»

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  • The ramblers guide to virtual environments

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):3/1 - 3/5
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB)

    Virtual environments offer some useful advantages over the real world, for example the ability to jump to anywhere within the environment at the click of a mouse button. Moving around a 3D environment using mouse movements alone can be a time consuming and tedious process, and therefore it is necessary to have a means of decreasing the effort and increasing the accuracy of navigation. But if all m... View full abstract»

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  • Improving interaction with virtual environments

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):4/1 - 4/4
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (360 KB)

    Virtual environments (VEs) provide a computer-based interface representing a real-life or abstract space, using 3D graphics and interaction techniques. VEs are a novel interface style that offers new possibilities and challenges to human-computer interface design. However, studies of the design of VEs (Kaur et al., 1996) show that designers lack a coherent approach to design, especially interactio... View full abstract»

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