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  • Abstract

We are glad to write, for the fifth time, the preface for the proceedings of the Socio-Technical Aspects in Security and Trust international workshop. STAST 2015 is a scientific event that was born to foster and support an interdisciplinary approach to computer security and trust. The first edition of the workshop took place in 2011 at the University of Milano, in Italy, hosted by the International Conference on Network and System Security (NSS). For all subsequent editions, the STAST workshop has been affiliated with the Computer Security Foundations Symposium (CSF). The 2012 and 2013 venues were held, respectively, at Harvard University and Tulane University in the United States of America; the 2014 edition, back in Europe, took place in Vienna, Austria, and was part of the big “Vienna Summer Logic 2014” event.

This is the fifth edition of the workshop, and it is again affiliated with CSF and being held at the University of Verona, Italy.

We have been organizing this workshop since its inception, every year inviting prestigious researchers—selected from experts in computer science, social sciences, and usable security—to serve as program chairs. Program Chairs Prof. Dieter Gollmann and Prof. Melanie Volkamer have worked effectively to define an appealing scientific program, embodying the interdisciplinary facets of the workshop.

We insist that this interdisciplinary fingerprint is not only a sign of distinction for our event, but also an effective measure to seriously address the socio-technical questions that security and trust pose today to society and researchers. Security and trust are socio-technical properties in fact; as such, they must be studied. We realize that security cannot be achieved by simply strengthening protocols without an adequate consideration that users may perceive it variously across the full range from it being a help to being a burden. They have to cope with technology and they have to trust it to cooperate with it, to make it possible for the system to be secure. Trust has a cognitive, social, and educational character that stems from how people evaluate risks and make decisions. By following a socio-technical approach to security and trust, STAST successfully yields insights that could escape a more traditional, purely technical analysis. Hence, a call for researchers from different disciplines, such as Sociology, Psychology and Informatics, to construct a holistic vision of the security and trust of modern systems.

We are pleased to conclude this foreword by thanking the program chairs, the Program Committee members, and the external reviewers for their excellent work. We thank the authors and the invited speakers for their contribution to the continuing success of our initiative. Finally, we thank the Fonds National de la Recherche Luxembourg (FNR), which, with its CORE project 11/IS/1183245 “Socio-Technical Analysis of Security and Trust,” has supported this workshop.

To our readers, we hope you enjoy this 2015 collection of papers.

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Giampaolo Bella

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Gabriele Lenzini

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