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Progress in Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Science and Technology in China Over the Past Three Decades

Figure 1

Figure 1
Number of projects supported by the NSFC from 1990 to 2011 (data taken from http://www.nsfc.gov.cn/Portal0/default152.htm).

Figure 2

Figure 2
High-quality papers related to HRS written by Chinese scientists from 1995 to September 2012 (data taken from Web of Science).

Figure 3

Figure 3
Schematic of the FISS.

Figure 4

Figure 4
The FISS at work: (left) situated on a ground-based multi-use platform and (right) mounted on an elevated car.

Figure 5

Figure 5
The MAIS sensor and its optical system.

Figure 6

Figure 6
The OMIS-I sensor and schematic.

Figure 7

Figure 7
The PHI sensor on the “King Air” aircraft and its imaging principle.

Figure 8

Figure 8
The UAV-based hyperspectral imaging system.

Figure 9

Figure 9
CMODIS hyperspectral image of the Yangtze River: standard false color in the order of Red: band 21(853 nm), Green: band 15 (693 nm) and Blue: band 8 (553 nm).

Figure 10

Figure 10
Schematic of The IIM (left) and the IIM sensor (right) [16].

Figure 11

Figure 11
The HJ-1A HSI sensor.

Figure 12

Figure 12
Distribution of the main HRS application domains in China.

Figure 13

Figure 13
Gold Exploration by FIMS in Xinjiang Province, China.

Figure 14

Figure 14
Pine Creek Uranium mine investigation by MAIS data. The yellow color represents the uranium deposit extracted by using the Spectral Absorption Index with data in wavelength 2.114–2.147 Formula$\mu$m and 2.336–2.367 Formula$\mu$m.

Figure 15

Figure 15
Fine classification of vegetable-growing regions with PHI hyperspectral data.

Figure 16

Figure 16
Distribution of the suspended matter concentration Meiliang Bay of Taihu Lake. Left: LANDSAT TM image of Taihu Lake; Right: suspended matter estimation result of Meiliang Bay by CHRIS data.

Figure 17

Figure 17
Distribution of the average planetary boundary layer SO2 column concentration over China during 2005–2008. 1, Shandong; 2, Tianjin; 3, Henan; 4, Hebei; 5, Shanghai; 6, Shanxi; 7, Jiangsu; 8, Beijing; 9, Liaoning; 10, Anhui; 11, Chongqing; 12, Hubei; 13, Jilin; 14, Heilongjiang; 15, Xizang (Tibet); 16, Sichuan; 17, Qinghai; 18, Shaanxi; 19, Guizhou; 20, Neimenggu; 21, Ningxia; 22, Gansu; 23, Xinjiang; 24, Hunan; 25, Zhejiang; 26, Yunnan; 27, Jiangxi; 28, Guangdong; 29, Guangxi; 30, Fujian; 31, Hainan.

Figure 18

Figure 18
Distribution of the diurnal temperature of the land surface in Shijiazhuang, China.

Figure 19

Figure 19
Monitoring of cold energy leaks in Darwin, Australia using TIR wavelength bands data of MAIS sensor.

Figure 20

Figure 20
Identification of roof sheet iron using the OMIS-II hyperspectral imagery.

Figure 21

Figure 21
Vegetation recovery monitoring after a fire using HJ-1A HSI data.

Figure 22

Figure 22
Classification of wetland vegetation by spectral matching technique in Poyang Lake area.

Figure 23

Figure 23
The system interface of HIPAS.

Figure 24

Figure 24
Software or tools related to HRS developed in China since 2006.