By Topic

back to article  |  Figures
All Figures

Beings on Earth: Is That All There Is?

Figure 1

Figure 1
SETI@home records data at Arecibo Observatory during sky surveys being conducted by the ALFA multibeam receiver. Those data are subsequently analyzed by distributed computing routines being run in the background of computers supplied by volunteers. Detected signals are sent to the University of California Berkeley for classification and further analysis. Credit: Seti@home.

Figure 2

Figure 2
Aerial view of the Allen Telescope array, now consisting of 42 antennas each 6.1 m in diameter, at the Hat Creek Radio Astronomy Observatory in northern California. The array can be used simultaneously for SETI observations and more traditional radio astronomy projects. Credit: G. Seth Shostak.

Figure 3

Figure 3
The Harvard OSETI sky survey observatory. (a) The inexpensive facility features a rollback roof with a section of the south-facing wall that can be removed to accommodate drift scans. (b) The 72Formula$^{\prime\prime}$ primary and 36Formula$^{\prime\prime}$ secondary mirrors, the detector housing for an array of photodiodes, and two of the student builders. Credit: Paul Horowitz.

Figure 4

Figure 4
The message sent to the globular cluster M13 using the S-band radar transmitter at the Arecibo Observatory on the occasion of the dedication of the new perforated aluminum paneled surface in 1974. The message consisted of 1679 b (73 rows and 23 columns). The message took less than 3 min to transmit and was repeated twice to ensure that the receiver would become aware of the correct number of bits. Credit: Arecibo Observatory.

Figure 5

Figure 5
Depictions of the atomic structure of several elements central to life on Earth, individually (on the left) and as found in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA; on the right). From the Voyager interstellar recording. Credit: Frank D. Drake.