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  • Abstract

The 2004 IEEE Educational Activities Board (EAB), chaired by IEEE Educational Activities Vice-President James M. Tien, upon the recommendation of the EAB Awards and Recognition Committee (ARC), has named the recipients of the 2004 IEEE EAB Awards. EAB awards recognize and honor individuals, companies, and IEEE Sections for major contributions to education in the areas of accreditation, continuing education, educational innovation, pre-college education, meritorious service to the IEEE EAB, employee professional development, Section professional development, and related achievements that advance the practice of engineering and of engineering education that are germane to the mission of the EAB.

The EAB Award Reception and Presentation was held on November 18, 2004 during the November 2004 IEEE Board of Directors Meeting Series in San Antonio, TX, where IEEE Vice-President Tien and EAB ARC Chair Durrani presented the awards.

2004 Award Recipients

  1. 2004 Meritorious Achievement Award in Accreditation Activities—Mr. William S. Clark and Dr. William E. Sayle II
  2. 2004 Meritorious Achievement Award in Continuing Education—Dr. Cary Y. Yang
  3. 2004 Major Educational Innovation Award—Dr. H. Vincent Poor
  4. 2004 Pre-College Educator Award—Dr. Mark D. Conner and Mrs. Rebekah Gendron
  5. 2004 Employer Professional Development Award—General Motors Technical Education Program
  6. 2004 Section Professional Development Award—IEEE Boston Section and IEEE Florida West Coast Section
SECTION I

IEEE EAB MERITORIOUS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD IN ACCREDITATION ACTIVITIES

The Meritorious Achievement Award in Accreditation Activities was established in 1984 by the Educational Activities Board of the IEEE to provide recognition for efforts to foster the maintenance and improvement of education through the process of accreditation of engineering, engineering technology, computer science and applied science programs.

The award is given to IEEE Members, Senior Members, and Fellows who have served as program evaluators, made contributions that have enhanced the accreditation process, and are currently or have recently been active in accreditation activities.

The award consists of a brass and walnut plaque and $1000.

Past recipients of the award are:

  • 1984—Paul E. Russell
  • 1985—Edward W. Ernst
  • 1986—Edwin C. Jones, Jr.
  • 1987—Robert L. Reid and Richard J. Ungrodt
  • 1988—Harriett B. Rigas
  • 1989—Irene C. Peden
  • 1990—Richard P. D'Onofrio and George D. Peterson
  • 1991—V. Thomas Rhyne
  • 1992—J. Thomas Cain
  • 1993—Arnold M. Peskin and Peter A.E. Rusche
  • 1994—Keki B. Irani and Willis K. King
  • 1995—Philip V. Lopresti
  • 1996—W. David Baker and Virgil I. Johannes
  • 1997—M. Tuncay Birand and Daniel B. Hodge
  • 1998—Demetrius T. Paris and Teofilo J. Ramos
  • 1999—Theodore A. Bickart and Richard A. Painter
  • 2000—Edward A. Parrish
  • 2001—Carl D. Avers and Stanley L. Love
  • 2002—M. Dayne Aldridge
  • 2003—Patricia D. Daniels and Gerald L. Engel

2004 Recipients

Mr. William S. Clark, “for preeminent service and outstanding knowledge that has advanced and promoted accreditation processes and activities to improve the quality of engineering technology education.”

William S. Clark (M'75) received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, in 1971 and the M.B.A. degree and M.A. degree in economics from the University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, in 1979 and 1982, respectively.

He is currently a Director in Finance for BellSouth Corporation, Atlanta, GA, and has worked for the company or one of its subsidiaries for 31 years, primarily in engineering and technical management positions.

Mr. Clark has contributed steadily and significantly to all areas of accreditation through his many leadership roles in the IEEE and in ABET, Inc., (formerly the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc.). In 1996, he was elected Fellow of ABET. He currently serves on the ABET Board of Directors Executive Committee. In March 2005, he was elected to serve as the ABET President-Elect 2006 and will take office as ABET President in 2007. He is a registered Professional Engineer. From 1996 to 1998, he led the ABET Criteria Committee that developed the first outcomes-based criteria for engineering technology programs. His vision and leadership were integral in the development of the new accreditation criteria that is of historic national importance. During this effort, his dedicated work with IEEE colleagues assured that IEEE views were represented in the development of these criteria. As a result of this initiative, accreditation and engineering technology education have changed to better prepare students to meet the demands of an increasingly complex work environment. Since 1975, he has participated actively in IEEE activities. In 1980, he served as Chair of the New Orleans Section of the Communications Society, and in 1986, he was a Director of the New Orleans IEEE Section. He has served as an IEEE accreditation program evaluator since 1984. He is a Member of the IEEE EAB Committee on Technology Accreditation Activities (CTAA), where through the years he has served in a number of key positions. In 2001, he was selected by the IEEE as an IEEE Representative Director on the ABET Board of Directors.

Dr. William E. Sayle II, “for contributions to enhancing the quality of engineering accreditation and dedicated service to ABET/IEEE accreditation bodies.”

William E. Sayle II (SM'61–M'70–SM'77–F'95) received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering degree and the M.S.E.E. degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 1963 and 1964, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Washington, Seattle, in 1970.

From 1965 to 1970, he worked for the Boeing Company. From 1970 to 2003, he was an Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Full Professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, where he was responsible for the undergraduate programs in electrical and computer engineering from 1988 to 2003. Since 2003, he has served as Director of Undergraduate Programs for Georgia Tech Lorraine in Metz, France.

Dr. Sayle was elected Fellow of the IEEE in 1995 “for contributions to engineering education.” He is a Member of the IEEE Education Society, the IEEE Power Electronics Society, and the American Society for Engineering Education. Since 1983, he has made outstanding contributions in engineering accreditation for the IEEE and ABET, Inc., (formerly the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc.). He served as an IEEE program evaluator for over 20 institutional evaluation visits for the ABET Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC). In 1990, he was elected to the IEEE EAB Committee on Engineering Accreditation Activities (CEAA), which recruits, trains, mentors, and evaluates IEEE engineering program evaluators. From 1995 to 1996, he chaired the CEAA, and in 1996 to 1997, he chaired the IEEE EAB Accreditation Policy Committee, which oversees IEEE accreditation activities in both engineering and engineering technology. Since 1998, he has served as IEEE Representative to the ABET EAC. At Georgia Tech, he helped develop the first Engineering Criteria 2000 (EC2000) Self-Study for a program at a major research university, which served as an exemplar for numerous programs of all sizes throughout the United States. During the transition to full implementation of EC2000, he trained and mentored evaluators and program representatives, helped clarify and disseminate best practices in evaluation, and helped assure consistent application of standards. Beyond his work in the United States, he has been a leader in international accreditation. He has provided consistent, excellent service as an international program evaluator on substantial equivalency visits and has contributed significantly to Georgia Tech's international programs.

SECTION II

IEEE EAB MERITORIOUS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD IN CONTINUING EDUCATION

The Meritorious Achievement Award in Continuing Education was established in 1984 by the IEEE EAB to provide recognition for dedicated contribution to the design, delivery and support of continuing education courses and programs in the fields of interest to IEEE Members.

The award is given to IEEE Members, Senior Members, and Fellows who distinguish themselves as unselfish in their support of continuing education and successful in the delivery of courses, as evidenced by their quality, quantity, and creativity.

The award consists of a brass and walnut plaque and $1000.

Past recipients of the award are:

  • 1984—Joseph M. Biedenbach
  • 1985—Charles J. Sener
  • 1986—Frank E. Burris
  • 1987—Robert M. Anderson, Jr.
  • 1988—Merrill W. Buckley, Jr.
  • 1989—Andrew Sekey
  • 1990—Eli Brookner
  • 1991—Willis F. Long
  • 1993—Joseph C. Palais
  • 1994—Sajjad H. Durrani and Philip H. Swain
  • 1995—Richard V. Tsina
  • 1996—Harry T. Roman
  • 1997—Bimal K. Bose and Mat Darveniza
  • 1998—Dieter K. Schroder
  • 1999—Mohamed E. El-Hawary
  • 2000—John H. Lau and Mohammed Safiuddin
  • 2001—C.P. (Ching Ping) Wong
  • 2002—Muhammad H. Rashid and Chaparala Satish
  • 2003—Daniel Berg and John R. Bourne

2004 Recipient

Dr. Cary Y. Yang, “for extensive and innovative contributions to the continuing education of working professionals in the field of micro/nanoelectronics.”

Cary Y. Yang (S'69–M'70–SM'84–F'99) received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, in 1970, 1971, and 1975, respectively.

After working in a number of research positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford, and NASA, he founded Surface Analytic Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA, where he directed sponsored research in surface and nanostructure science. In 1983, he joined Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA, and is currently Professor of Electrical Engineering, Associate Dean of Engineering, and Director of the Center for Nanostructures. Over the past 20 years, he has initiated innovative programs to educate and train technical professionals in various stages of their careers. From 1984 to 1990, he developed and offered short courses on timely topics in silicon technology to Silicon Valley professionals. From 1994 to 1997, he offered short courses on semiconductor technology for SEMI (Semiconductor Equipment and Materials Institute) as part of a retraining program for professionals in other fields. Since 1986, he has provided opportunities for his students to spend extended periods with companies in Japan, where they collaborated with their hosts on their thesis research. More recently, he founded the Center for Nanostructures at Santa Clara University, which offers interdisciplinary research and education opportunities for university students and faculty, high school students and teachers, as well as Silicon Valley technical professionals. He has been a consultant to industry and government and a Visiting Professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Tsukuba, National University of Singapore, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of California, Berkeley.

Prof. Yang was elected Fellow of the IEEE in 1999 “for contributions to microelectronic education and the understanding of interfacial properties of silicon-based devices.” He has actively participated in IEEE activities and has served as Santa Clara Valley Chapter Chair, Regions/Chapters Chair, Vice-President, and President of the IEEE Electron Devices Society. In 2002 and 2003, he served as an elected member of the IEEE Board of Directors, representing Division I. He was an editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES in the area of metal–oxide–semiconductor devices.

SECTION III

IEEE EAB MAJOR EDUCATIONAL INNOVATION AWARD

The Major Educational Innovation Award was established in 1984 by the Educational Activities Board of the IEEE to recognize individuals who have distinguished themselves for outstanding educational innovation in a field of interest of the IEEE. The award is given to IEEE Members, Senior Members, and Fellows whose innovation has made a major impact and been emulated outside the individual's immediate environment.

The award consists of a brass and walnut plaque and $1000.

Past recipients of the award are:

  • 1984—Lynn A. Conway
  • 1985—William H. Hayt, Jr.
  • 1986—William R. Grogan
  • 1988—Jack Munushian
  • 1990—Lionel V. Baldwin
  • 1991—David A. Conner and David M. Hata
  • 1994—Claude J. M. Gueguen, Jacques Neirynck, Bernard Robinet, John C. Sutton, III
  • 1995—Arthur W. Winston
  • 1996—Burks Oakley, II
  • 1998—Shankara K. Prasad
  • 1999—Donna J. Brown
  • 2000—Hidenori Akiyama and James M. Tien
  • 2001—Kenneth Y. Goldberg
  • 2003—Rao R. Tummala

2004 Recipient

Dr. H. Vincent Poor, “for innovation and leadership in the teaching of technical, social, political and economic aspects of technology as integral subject matter to students from diverse academic backgrounds.”

H. Vincent Poor (S'72–M'77–SM'82–F'87) received the B.E.E. degree and the M.S. degree in electrical engineering from Auburn University, Auburn, AL, in 1972 and 1974, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering and computer science from Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, in 1977.

From 1977 to 1990, he was a Faculty Member at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Since 1990, he has been a Faculty Member at Princeton University, where he is the George Van Ness Lothrop Professor in Engineering.

He has also held visiting appointments at several universities in the United States and abroad, including recently at Imperial College, London, U.K., Stanford University, Stanford, CA; and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. At Princeton, he has been engaged in teaching and research in wireless communications and related fields. In 2000, he began teaching a new course titled The Wireless Revolution: Telecommunications for the 21st Century to undergraduates in engineering and the liberal arts. This innovative course uses the rapidly developing field of wireless communications as a paradigm for teaching students about the technical, social, economic and political dimensions of technology. It has become one of the largest and most diverse courses ever offered at Princeton. His research has led to more than 500 publications, including nine books.

Dr. Poor was elected Fellow of the IEEE in 1987 “for contributions to the theory of robust linear filtering applied to signal detection and estimation.” He is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE). He received the ASEE Terman Award in 1992 in recognition of his widely used graduate textbook An Introduction to Signal Detection and Estimation. His recent honors include the IEEE Graduate Teaching Award (2001), the Joint Paper Award of the IEEE Communications and Information Theory Societies (2001), the National Science Foundation (NSF) Director's Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars (2002), a Guggenheim Fellowship (2002–2003), and the Princeton School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) Distinguished Teacher Award (2003). Among his many contributions to the IEEE, he has served as President of the IEEE Information Theory Society and as a Member of the IEEE Board of Directors, and he is currently Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY.

SECTION IV

IEEE EAB PRE-COLLEGE EDUCATOR AWARD

The Pre-College Educator Award was established in 2000 by the IEEE Educational Activities Board to recognize current pre-college classroom teachers who have inspired an appreciation and understanding of mathematics, science, and technology and the engineering process in students and who have encouraged students to pursue technical careers.

The award consists of a brass and walnut plaque and $1000.

Past recipients of the award are:

  1. 2001—Ervin L. Nevsimal
  2. 2002—Bonnie Porter and Christine Wutte

2004 Recipients

Dr. Mark D. Conner, “for inspiring high school students to appreciate and understand mathematics, science, technology and the engineering process; demonstrating excellence in teaching and guidance; and developing an innovative high school engineering curriculum.”

Mark D. Conner received the B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, (UAB), in 1991 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from Duke University, Durham, NC, in 1993 and 1996, respectively.

From 1996 to 2003, he taught high school in the Homewood City School System, Birmingham, AL. While there, he developed two innovative high school engineering courses that provided students with significant engineering analysis and design experience. He is now in his second year of teaching at Hoover High School, Hoover, AL. He has taught physical science, physics, advanced placement physics, digital signal processing and engineering research and design. Since joining the Science Department Faculty at Hoover High School, he has been developing a four-year engineering curriculum, which is designed to introduce students to the various disciplines within engineering, to provide numerous opportunities to be a part of the engineering design process, and to prepare them to be successful in an undergraduate engineering program upon graduation. In his work at both schools, the courses he has developed already serve as a model for the introduction of engineering content into high school courses, and he is a dedicated and innovative educator who continually strives to expand the vision of the school system to improve instruction and student learning. He serves as an instructor for the Infinity Project (a program sponsored by the Southern Methodist University School of Engineering and Texas Instruments that introduces students to engineering), where he trains high school mathematics, science, and technology teachers to teach digital signal processing in their schools. He also holds an appointment as Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UAB, where, since 1998, he has taught a variety of electrical circuits courses for all engineering majors.

Dr. Conner received the Charles T. Main Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for being the outstanding mechanical engineering student in the United Stated during his senior year at the University of Alabama.

Mrs. Rebekah Gendron, “for outstanding achievement in establishing and directing the Rhode Island Robotics/FIRST Lego League statewide competition.”

Rebekah Gendron received the B.S. and M.Ed. degrees in technology education from Rhode Island College, Providence, in 1982 and 1992, respectively.

Since 1986, she has been teaching at Riverside Middle School, East Providence, RI. She has taught drafting, woodworking technology, computer-aided drafting, and robotics. She is responsible for developing and implementing the robotics program at Riverside. In this curriculum, students use their imagination and problem-solving skills to create, design, build, and program robots with specific tasks and objectives in mind.

Her aspiration to motivate students to explore science and technology has led her to become involved in the FIRST (First In Recognition of Science and Technology) LEGO League (FLL) Robotics Competition. Each year, FLL announces its “challenge,” highlighting a current scientific or technological problem facing the world. Participants build a robot and compete in a robotics event that is specially designed for their age group. In 2001, she was instrumental in organizing the first Rhode Island FLL Robotics Competition. The following year, she became the state Tournament Director. In 2004, over 350 students across Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts participated in the Rhode Island FLL competition. As tournament director, she is responsible for organizing all facets of the competition. Her students participated in the competition and created animal robots that replicate movements of real animals. They used math to calculate gear ratios and science, teamwork, and problem-solving skills to determine how to build complex machines. She has been very focused and committed to bringing technology to middle school students and has successfully used robotics as a tool to accomplish her vision. With the success of the robotics program at Riverside, a robotics program has been initiated at the other middle school in the district as well as the high school to prepare students for careers in technology and engineering.

Mrs. Gendron is Co-President of the Rhode Island Technology Educators Association. She is the recipient of the New England Association of Technology Teachers 2003 Rhode Island Technology Teacher and Program of the Year Award.

SECTION V

IEEE EAB EMPLOYER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AWARD

The Employer Professional Development Award, established in 1995 by the IEEE EAB, recognizes organizations employing IEEE Members for contributions to employee continuing education and professional development. This award is given to organizations whose contributions to employee continuing education and professional development are outstanding, as evidenced by their quality, comprehensiveness, innovation, or impact.

The award consists of a brass and walnut plaque.

Past recipients of the award are:

  • 1997—Motorola and Texas Instruments
  • 1998—Turk Elektrik
  • 1999—Samsung Electronics Co, Ltd. (SEC)
  • 2000—Lucent Technologies
  • 2001—AT&T
  • 2003—Saudi Aramco

2004 Recipient

General Motors Technical Education Program, “for superior and sustained global delivery of value-added employee technical education that provides General Motors with a sustainable competitive advantage.”

General Motors Corporation (GM), the world's largest vehicle manufacturer, employs about 325 000 people globally. Founded in 1908, GM has been the global automotive sales leader since 1931. GM today has manufacturing operations in 32 countries, and its vehicles are sold in 192 countries.

GM is committed to developing a well-educated and trained workforce that will succeed in tomorrow's global manufacturing environment. This is accomplished through the GM Technical Education Program (TEP), which is GM's award-winning, corporate-sponsored education program. Since 1984, the TEP has partnered with leading universities to provide job-related education to GM professionals. Delivered through the flexibility of distance-learning technologies, the program makes high-quality flexible education from top-ranking universities easily accessible to GM employees. Students routinely enroll in technical courses from Purdue University, Michigan University, Carnegie-Mellon University, Stanford University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), and other peer institutions while pursuing a single degree from one university. The mission of the GM TEP is to provide GM's technical community with a competitive advantage by offering an education core to the business in current and emerging technologies in partnership with global university suppliers. GM leadership directs and supports the program both philosophically and financially and is committed to strategic alignment of the curriculum, effectiveness of plans of study, global multi-university quality content and delivery, and impact on corporate goal attainment.

The GM TEP has received a number of awards for leadership, innovation, and excellence in education from national and international organizations, including the American Society for Engineering Education and the Society of Automotive Engineers International. Moreover, the TEP honors employees who have demonstrated the application of knowledge gained through education to improve GM's competitive advantage by annually awarding the Value Added Award to employees who have contributed cost savings, increased positive cash flow, or have made efficiency, reliability, or quality improvements to the company as a result of their coursework. Since July 1999, value-added projects have amounted to savings, positive cash flow, or cost avoidance of over $130 million.

GM supports employee involvement with the IEEE. Many GM employees are active members of the IEEE and serve in key leadership positions.

SECTION VI

IEEE EAB SECTION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AWARD

The Section Professional Development Award, established in 2001 by the IEEE EAB, recognizes Sections for major contributions to IEEE Members in the area of lifelong learning, continuing education, and professional development. This award is given to Sections whose contributions to continuing education and professional development are outstanding, as evidenced by their quality, comprehensiveness, innovation, or impact.

The award consists of a brass and walnut plaque.

Past recipients of the award are:

  • 2003—The Argentina Section and the Houston Section

2004 Recipients

The Boston Section, “for excellence in fulfilling the professional and educational needs of its members.”

The IEEE Boston Section celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2003. Since its beginnings, the Section has continuously developed and offered lecture series, courses, and conferences geared toward improving the professional educational level of members. A majority of these offerings involve the training of members on state-of-the-art technology even before it is adopted into the college curricula. Major corporations in the area require—and financially support—their employees to attend these programs.

Over the years, the Boston Section has developed a nucleus of expert lecturers from academia and industry that develop and teach lecture series, short courses, and tutorials exclusively for the Boston Section. Annually, the Boston Section offers 25 to 30 lecture series or short courses, which collectively draw over 500 participants. A majority of the lecture series and courses offer the added benefit of Continuing Education Units (CEUs) for attendees. Another important aspect of the Section's activities is the Chapter technical meeting program. These are lectures that are coordinated by the Chapters and provide expert speakers on state-of-the-art technical subjects. These meetings serve to keep IEEE members up to date professionally on an almost real-time basis. Annually, about 2000 members attend 120 Chapter technical meetings. Also, the Section is a lead sponsor of several international conferences per year that feature world-renown experts, which draw 400 to 500 attendees each.

The Section has developed a sophisticated method of informing members of the availability of professional offerings. Most important are the eight annual mailings of the Boston Section newsletter The Reflector. The newsletter is sent to approximately 15 000 IEEE members, including all members of the Boston Section as well as all members of the Central New England Council (CNEC). In addition, the Section e-mails the electronic version, the e-Reflector, to 9000 members monthly. The Section also maintains a website that provides information on all of its professional programs along with a secure server that allows members to register and pay online.

The Boston Section is truly dedicated to its mission to serve the professional development aspirations of its members and consistently delivers a well-balanced, professional, and timely program.

The Florida West Coast Section, “for major contributions to lifelong learning, continuing education, and professional development through sponsorship of Section/Society meetings, seminars, workshops and international conferences.”

The IEEE Florida West Coast Section (FWCS), established in 1952, has many active volunteers who work together to plan and carry out numerous continuing-education programs and events for the benefit of the membership. It hosts at least one major conference each year, such as the Wireless and Microwave Technology Conference (WAMI) and the Industrial & Commercial Power Systems Conference (I&CPS) in 2004, the IEEE Sections Congress in 2005, and the IEEE Industry Applications Society (IAS) Annual Meeting in 2006. The Societies in the Section sponsor monthly technical meetings, and the Section strives to sponsor at least one local conference per year to enable local members to attend without incurring travel expenses.

The Section has for several years hosted Teacher In-Service Workshops to promote engineering through hands-on projects that teachers can take back to the classroom. This project was expanded to other Sections around the world. The exemplary FWCS website serves as a portal to obtain the latest news, register online for meetings, obtain information about local conferences, and link to many other IEEE activities. The Section has close ties to the University of South Florida and provides mentoring and other support for the Student Branch. This activity, as well as the Section's GOLD (Graduates of the Last Decade) Chapter, successfully promotes continuing involvement with the IEEE during college and after graduation.

The Section and the Power Engineering Society (PES)/IAS Chapter were among the first in Florida to recognize the need to provide professional development hours (PDHs) to members who are registered professional engineers. A comprehensive program was developed and implemented to insure numerous opportunities for these members to maintain their licenses and also to insure that the Section complied with all of the state's rules and regulations in this regard. This program has become a model for other Chapters in Florida that now provide similar services to members.

The momentum within the Section continues to draw new, enthusiastic volunteers who quickly realize the benefits derived from participation in IEEE activities, especially the opportunity to develop management and leadership skills in executing major projects—a skill that transfers directly into the workplace.

T. S. Durrani can be contacted at: the University of Strathclyde, George Street, Glasgow G1 1XW, Scotland, U.K.; Tel.: 0141 548 2540; Fax: 0141 552 2487 (e-mail: durrani@strath.ac.uk).

For information regarding EAB Awards, contact: Rae Toscano, Manager, EAB Administration, IEEE Educational Activities, 445 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854-1331 USA (e-mail: r.toscano@ieee.org). Tel. +1 732 562 5482. Fax: +1 732 981 1686. http://www.ieee.org/portal/cms_docs/education/EABAwards/index.htm

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Authors

Mr. William S. Clark

Mr. William S. Clark

Mr. William S. Clark, “for preeminent service and outstanding knowledge that has advanced and promoted accreditation processes and activities to improve the quality of engineering technology education.”

William S. Clark (M'75) received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, in 1971 and the M.B.A. degree and M.A. degree in economics from the University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, in 1979 and 1982, respectively.

He is currently a Director in Finance for BellSouth Corporation, Atlanta, GA, and has worked for the company or one of its subsidiaries for 31 years, primarily in engineering and technical management positions.

Mr. Clark has contributed steadily and significantly to all areas of accreditation through his many leadership roles in the IEEE and in ABET, Inc., (formerly the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc.). In 1996, he was elected Fellow of ABET. He currently serves on the ABET Board of Directors Executive Committee. In March 2005, he was elected to serve as the ABET President-Elect 2006 and will take office as ABET President in 2007. He is a registered Professional Engineer. From 1996 to 1998, he led the ABET Criteria Committee that developed the first outcomes-based criteria for engineering technology programs. His vision and leadership were integral in the development of the new accreditation criteria that is of historic national importance. During this effort, his dedicated work with IEEE colleagues assured that IEEE views were represented in the development of these criteria. As a result of this initiative, accreditation and engineering technology education have changed to better prepare students to meet the demands of an increasingly complex work environment. Since 1975, he has participated actively in IEEE activities. In 1980, he served as Chair of the New Orleans Section of the Communications Society, and in 1986, he was a Director of the New Orleans IEEE Section. He has served as an IEEE accreditation program evaluator since 1984. He is a Member of the IEEE EAB Committee on Technology Accreditation Activities (CTAA), where through the years he has served in a number of key positions. In 2001, he was selected by the IEEE as an IEEE Representative Director on the ABET Board of Directors.

Dr. William E. Sayle II

Dr. William E. Sayle II

Dr. William E. Sayle II, “for contributions to enhancing the quality of engineering accreditation and dedicated service to ABET/IEEE accreditation bodies.”

William E. Sayle II (SM'61–M'70–SM'77– F'95) received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering degree and the M.S.E.E. degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 1963 and 1964, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Washington, Seattle, in 1970.

From 1965 to 1970, he worked for the Boeing Company. From 1970 to 2003, he was an Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Full Professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, where he was responsible for the undergraduate programs in electrical and computer engineering from 1988 to 2003. Since 2003, he has served as Director of Undergraduate Programs for Georgia Tech Lorraine in Metz, France.

Dr. Sayle was elected Fellow of the IEEE in 1995 “for contributions to engineering education.” He is a Member of the IEEE Education Society, the IEEE Power Electronics Society, and the American Society for Engineering Education. Since 1983, he has made outstanding contributions in engineering accreditation for the IEEE and ABET, Inc., (formerly the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc.). He served as an IEEE program evaluator for over 20 institutional evaluation visits for the ABET Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC). In 1990, he was elected to the IEEE EAB Committee on Engineering Accreditation Activities (CEAA), which recruits, trains, mentors, and evaluates IEEE engineering program evaluators. From 1995 to 1996, he chaired the CEAA, and in 1996 to 1997, he chaired the IEEE EAB Accreditation Policy Committee, which oversees IEEE accreditation activities in both engineering and engineering technology. Since 1998, he has served as IEEE Representative to the ABET EAC. At Georgia Tech, he helped develop the first Engineering Criteria 2000 (EC2000) Self-Study for a program at a major research university, which served as an exemplar for numerous programs of all sizes throughout the United States. During the transition to full implementation of EC2000, he trained and mentored evaluators and program representatives, helped clarify and disseminate best practices in evaluation, and helped assure consistent application of standards. Beyond his work in the United States, he has been a leader in international accreditation. He has provided consistent, excellent service as an international program evaluator on substantial equivalency visits and has contributed significantly to Georgia Tech's international programs.

Dr. Cary Y. Yang

Dr. Cary Y. Yang

Dr. Cary Y. Yang, “for extensive and innovative contributions to the continuing education of working professionals in the field of micro/nanoelectronics.”

Cary Y. Yang (S'69– M'70– SM'84– F'99) received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, in 1970, 1971, and 1975, respectively.

After working in a number of research positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford, and NASA, he founded Surface Analytic Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA, where he directed sponsored research in surface and nanostructure science. In 1983, he joined Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA, and is currently Professor of Electrical Engineering, Associate Dean of Engineering, and Director of the Center for Nanostructures. Over the past 20 years, he has initiated innovative programs to educate and train technical professionals in various stages of their careers. From 1984 to 1990, he developed and offered short courses on timely topics in silicon technology to Silicon Valley professionals. From 1994 to 1997, he offered short courses on semiconductor technology for SEMI (Semiconductor Equipment and Materials Institute) as part of a retraining program for professionals in other fields. Since 1986, he has provided opportunities for his students to spend extended periods with companies in Japan, where they collaborated with their hosts on their thesis research. More recently, he founded the Center for Nanostructures at Santa Clara University, which offers interdisciplinary research and education opportunities for university students and faculty, high school students and teachers, as well as Silicon Valley technical professionals. He has been a consultant to industry and government and a Visiting Professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Tsukuba, National University of Singapore, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of California, Berkeley.

Prof. Yang was elected Fellow of the IEEE in 1999 “for contributions to microelectronic education and the understanding of interfacial properties of silicon-based devices.” He has actively participated in IEEE activities and has served as Santa Clara Valley Chapter Chair, Regions/Chapters Chair, Vice-President, and President of the IEEE Electron Devices Society. In 2002 and 2003, he served as an elected member of the IEEE Board of Directors, representing Division I. He was an editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES in the area of metal–oxide–semiconductor devices.

Dr. H. Vincent Poor

Dr. H. Vincent Poor

Dr. H. Vincent Poor, “for innovation and leadership in the teaching of technical, social, political and economic aspects of technology as integral subject matter to students from diverse academic backgrounds.”

H. Vincent Poor (S'72–M'77– SM'82–F'87) received the B.E.E. degree and the M.S. degree in electrical engineering from Auburn University, Auburn, AL, in 1972 and 1974, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering and computer science from Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, in 1977.

From 1977 to 1990, he was a Faculty Member at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Since 1990, he has been a Faculty Member at Princeton University, where he is the George Van Ness Lothrop Professor in Engineering.

He has also held visiting appointments at several universities in the United States and abroad, including recently at Imperial College, London, U.K., Stanford University, Stanford, CA; and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. At Princeton, he has been engaged in teaching and research in wireless communications and related fields. In 2000, he began teaching a new course titled The Wireless Revolution: Telecommunications for the 21st Century to undergraduates in engineering and the liberal arts. This innovative course uses the rapidly developing field of wireless communications as a paradigm for teaching students about the technical, social, economic and political dimensions of technology. It has become one of the largest and most diverse courses ever offered at Princeton. His research has led to more than 500 publications, including nine books.

Dr. Poor was elected Fellow of the IEEE in 1987 “for contributions to the theory of robust linear filtering applied to signal detection and estimation.” He is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE). He received the ASEE Terman Award in 1992 in recognition of his widely used graduate textbook An Introduction to Signal Detection and Estimation. His recent honors include the IEEE Graduate Teaching Award (2001), the Joint Paper Award of the IEEE Communications and Information Theory Societies (2001), the National Science Foundation (NSF) Director's Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars (2002), a Guggenheim Fellowship (2002–2003), and the Princeton School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) Distinguished Teacher Award (2003). Among his many contributions to the IEEE, he has served as President of the IEEE Information Theory Society and as a Member of the IEEE Board of Directors, and he is currently Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY.

Dr. Mark D. Conner

Dr. Mark D. Conner

Dr. Mark D. Conner, “for inspiring high school students to appreciate and understand mathematics, science, technology and the engineering process; demonstrating excellence in teaching and guidance; and developing an innovative high school engineering curriculum.”

Mark D. Conner received the B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, (UAB), in 1991 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from Duke University, Durham, NC, in 1993 and 1996, respectively.

From 1996 to 2003, he taught high school in the Homewood City School System, Birmingham, AL. While there, he developed two innovative high school engineering courses that provided students with significant engineering analysis and design experience. He is now in his second year of teaching at Hoover High School, Hoover, AL. He has taught physical science, physics, advanced placement physics, digital signal processing and engineering research and design. Since joining the Science Department Faculty at Hoover High School, he has been developing a four-year engineering curriculum, which is designed to introduce students to the various disciplines within engineering, to provide numerous opportunities to be a part of the engineering design process, and to prepare them to be successful in an undergraduate engineering program upon graduation. In his work at both schools, the courses he has developed already serve as a model for the introduction of engineering content into high school courses, and he is a dedicated and innovative educator who continually strives to expand the vision of the school system to improve instruction and student learning. He serves as an instructor for the Infinity Project (a program sponsored by the Southern Methodist University School of Engineering and Texas Instruments that introduces students to engineering), where he trains high school mathematics, science, and technology teachers to teach digital signal processing in their schools. He also holds an appointment as Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UAB, where, since 1998, he has taught a variety of electrical circuits courses for all engineering majors.

Dr. Conner received the Charles T. Main Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for being the outstanding mechanical engineering student in the United Stated during his senior year at the University of Alabama.

Mrs. Rebekah Gendron

Mrs. Rebekah Gendron

Mrs. Rebekah Gendron, “for outstanding achievement in establishing and directing the Rhode Island Robotics/FIRST Lego League statewide competition.”

Rebekah Gendron received the B.S. and M.Ed. degrees in technology education from Rhode Island College, Providence, in 1982 and 1992, respectively.

Since 1986, she has been teaching at Riverside Middle School, East Providence, RI. She has taught drafting, woodworking technology, computer-aided drafting, and robotics. She is responsible for developing and implementing the robotics program at Riverside. In this curriculum, students use their imagination and problem-solving skills to create, design, build, and program robots with specific tasks and objectives in mind.

Her aspiration to motivate students to explore science and technology has led her to become involved in the FIRST (First In Recognition of Science and Technology) LEGO League (FLL) Robotics Competition. Each year, FLL announces its “challenge,” highlighting a current scientific or technological problem facing the world. Participants build a robot and compete in a robotics event that is specially designed for their age group. In 2001, she was instrumental in organizing the first Rhode Island FLL Robotics Competition. The following year, she became the state Tournament Director. In 2004, over 350 students across Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts participated in the Rhode Island FLL competition. As tournament director, she is responsible for organizing all facets of the competition. Her students participated in the competition and created animal robots that replicate movements of real animals. They used math to calculate gear ratios and science, teamwork, and problem-solving skills to determine how to build complex machines. She has been very focused and committed to bringing technology to middle school students and has successfully used robotics as a tool to accomplish her vision. With the success of the robotics program at Riverside, a robotics program has been initiated at the other middle school in the district as well as the high school to prepare students for careers in technology and engineering.

Mrs. Gendron is Co-President of the Rhode Island Technology Educators Association. She is the recipient of the New England Association of Technology Teachers 2003 Rhode Island Technology Teacher and Program of the Year Award.

Tariq S. Durrani

Tariq S. Durrani

Tariq S. Durrani (M'82–SM'87–F'89) received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Southampton, Southampton, U.K., in 1967 and 1970, respectively.

After a postdoctoral research position at Southampton, he joined the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, U.K., as a Lecturer in 1976 and was appointed Professor of Signal Processing in 1982. He was Head of the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering from 1986 to 1990 and Special Advisor to the Principal, on Information Technology, from 1990 to 1994. He is currently Deputy Principal. At his university, he has oversight responsibility for lifelong learning, staff development, and research, education, and the promotion of entrepreneurship. For the past 25 years, he has worked on and supervised some 60 projects sponsored by the U.K. Research Councils, government and industry, the U.S. Navy, and the European Union, amongst others. He has supervised over 30 Ph.D. students and is the author/coauthor of more than 300 papers and six books. He is a Director of the U.K. Leadership Foundation for Higher Education, the Glasgow Chamber of Commerce, the Institute for System Level Integration, and the Scottish Institute for Entrepreneurship. He is the Chairman of the West of Scotland Centre for the Knowledge Transfer Partnership for the promotion of university–industry collaborative research and development. His research interests are in the areas of signal/image processing, technology management, and higher education management.

Prof. Durrani is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Institution of Electrical Engineers (IEE), and the Royal Society of Edinburgh. He was awarded the OBE in the Queen's Honours List in December 2002. He is the 2004 Chair of the IEEE Awards and Recognition Committee, IEEE Education Activities Board; Executive Vice President of the IEEE Engineering Management Society; and a Member of the Editorial Board of IEEE SPECTRUM. He is a Past President of the IEEE Signal Processing Society and past Chair of the IEEE TAB Periodicals Council. He is currently Deputy Principal at the University of Strathclyde.

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