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Solid-State Circuits Society Newsletter, IEEE

Popular Articles (February 2015)

Includes the top 50 most frequently downloaded documents for this publication according to the most recent monthly usage statistics.
  • 1. The Stacked Capacitor DRAM Cell and Three-Dimensional Memory

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 37 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1233 KB)  

    The author chronicles the development of the stacked three-dimensional (3D) DRAM cell, highlighting his role in solving the problems of memory data-bandwidth and forecasting a dramatic increase in memory capacity based on his current work using "super-chip" integration technology. View full abstract»

    Open Access
  • 2. A Short Story of the EKV MOS Transistor Model

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 24 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (382 KB)  

    The EKV MOS transistor model and design methodology evolved from the first weak inversion transistor models of the 1970's. In this first-hand account, Christian Enz chronicles the evolution of the hierarchical structure, limited parameters and flexibility of the EKV model that he developed with colleagues such as Francois Krummenacher and Eric Vittoz (the "E" "K" and "V" of EKV) at the Centre Electronique Horloger (CEH) in Neuchatel. With the aggressive downscaling of CMOS technologies today, the EKV compact model is shifting increasingly from the traditional strong inversion region toward moderate and weak inversion regions. View full abstract»

    Open Access
  • 3. Cramming more components onto integrated circuits, Reprinted from Electronics, volume 38, number 8, April 19, 1965, pp.114 ff.

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 33 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (193 KB)  

    Moore's theories about the future of transistor technology first appeared in Electronics magazine in April 1965. Termed a "law" years later by Caltech professor Carver Mead, Moore's Law went on to become a self-fulfilling prophecy. View full abstract»

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  • 4. The Electronic Watch and Low-Power Circuits

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 7 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4535 KB)  

    Renowned as an expert in low-power CMOS circuit design and for groundbreaking work with miniature electronic devices, Dr. Eric A. Vittoz relates his life, work and times in this original retrospective for the SSCS News. According to Yannis Tsividis, also in this issue, Dr. Vittoz's influence continues to grow, as low voltage and low power become increasingly important in the engineering of mobile devices. Dr. Vittoz is a Research Fellow at the Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology in Neuchatel, Switzerland, an IEEE Fellow, and a professor at EPFL, the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne. He has published more than 130 papers and holds 26 patents. View full abstract»

    Open Access
  • 5. Design of ion-implanted MOSFET's with very small physical dimensions

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 38 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2084 KB)  

    This paper considers the design, fabrication, and characterization of very small MOSFET switching devices suitable for digital integrated circuits using dimensions of the order of 1μ. Scaling relationships are presented which show how a conventional MOSFET can be reduced in size. An improved small device structure is presented that uses ion implantation to proVide shallow source and drain regions and a nonuniform substrate doping profile. Onedimensional models are used to predict the substrate doping profile and the corresponding threshold voltage versus source voltage characteristic. A two-dimensional current transport model is used to predict the relative degree of short-channel effects for different device parameter combinations. Polysilicon-gate MOSFETs with channel lengths as short as 0.5μ were fabricated, and the device characteristics measured and compared with predicted values. Ibe performance improvement expected from using these very small devices in highly miniaturized integrated circuits is projected. Reprintedfrom the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. SC-9, October 1974, pp. 256-268.] View full abstract»

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  • 6. Bell's Law for the Birth and Death of Computer Classes: A theory of the Computer's Evolution

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 8 - 19
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2139 KB)  

    In 1951 a man could walk inside a computer. By 2010, a computer cluster with millions of processors will have expanded to building size. In this new paper Gordon Bell explains the history of the computing industry, positing a general theory ("Bell's Law) for the creation, evolution, and death of computer classes since 1951. Using the exponential transistor density increases forecast by Moore's Law in 1965 and 1975 as the principal basis for the life cycle of computer classes after the microprocessor was introduced in 1971, he predicts that the powerful microprocessor will be the basis for nearly all computer classes in 2010, from personal computers and servers costing a few thousand dollars to scalable servers costing a few hundred million dollars. Soon afterward, billions of cell phones for personal computing, and tens of billions of wireless sensor nets will unwire and interconnect everything. View full abstract»

    Open Access
  • 7. A 30 Year Retrospective on Dennard's MOSFET Scaling Paper

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 11 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (690 KB)  

    The MOSFET scaling principles for obtaining simultaneous improvements in transistor density, switching speed, and power dissipation described by Robert H. Dennard and others in "Design of Ion-implanted MOSFETs with Very Small Physical Dimensions" (1974 ) became a roadmap for the semiconductor industry to provide systematic and predictable transistor improvements. New technology generations emerging approximately every three years during the 1970's and 1980's and appearing every other year starting in the mid-1990's, promise to continue although we face growing challenges. View full abstract»

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  • 8. The gears of genius

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 10 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3150 KB)  

    A self-described "lone wolf-cub, befriended only by a hyperactive urge to experiment with everything," the author recalls his coming of age in the nascent world of analog circuit design and his emergence as an inventor and author of papers that have become classics in the field. View full abstract»

    Open Access
  • 9. Validity of the Single Processor Approach to Achieving Large Scale Computing Capabilities, Reprinted from the AFIPS Conference Proceedings, Vol. 30 (Atlantic City, N.J., Apr. 18–20), AFIPS Press, Reston, Va., 1967, pp. 483–485, when Dr. Amdahl was at International Business Machines Corporation, Sunnyvale, California

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 19 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (188 KB)  

    Reprinted from the AFIPS Conference Proceedings, Vol. 30 (Atlantic City, N.J., Apr. 18-20), AFIPS Press, Reston, Va., 1967, pp. 483-485, when Dr. Amdahl was at International Business Machines Corporation, Sunnyvale,California. This influential article by Dr. Amdahl demonstrated the validity of the single processor approach, based on statistical characteristics of computation on computers from the mid 1950's - 60's and upon the operational requirements within problems of physical interest. View full abstract»

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  • 10. A JSSC classic paper: Matching properties of MOS transistors

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 6 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (70 KB)  

    Published in the October 1989 JSSC, “Matching properties of MOS transistors” by Marcel J.M. Pelgrom, Aad C.J. Duinmaijer, and Anton P.G. Welbers of Phillips Research Laboratories, Eindhoven, Netherlands, is a classic article. It has been cited more than 150 times according the Journal Citation Report, 2003 Science Edition. The concepts were presented first in the fall meeting of ESSCIRC one year before they were published in the JSSC. View full abstract»

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  • 11. The Impact of Moore's Law

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 25 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (245 KB)  

    The ever-increasing number of integrated transistors on silicon chips has earned fame as "Moore's Law," according to which miniaturization and "cleverness" (more compact device designs) reduce cost-per-element, increase storage capacity, and promote reliability. Low-cost integrated electronics have revolutionized everyday life and expanded the role of computation in science and engineering. View full abstract»

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  • 12. Eric Vittoz and the Strong Impact of Weak Inversion Circuits

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 56 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (158 KB)  

    In a groundbreaking and now classic 1977 paper, Eric Vittoz and J. Fellrath meticulously characterized and developed models for devices operating in the weak inversion region, as well as a variety of circuit building blocks that could operate and exploit the exponential characteristics in this region. Their killer application -- the electronic watch -- employed techniques that are now used in a score of low-voltage, micropower applications, such as biomedical devices, hearing aids, pagers, sensor interfaces, motion detectors for pointing devices, and a variety of portable instruments. This tribute to Vittoz as an educator and industrial researcher is by Yannis Tsividis of Columbia University, an esteemed scientist and educator in his own right. View full abstract»

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  • 13. Revisiting "Evolution of the MOSFET Dynamic RAM – A Personal View"

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 10 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (840 KB)  

    This first-person account of the early days of semiconductor memory development is reprinted from the IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices, Vol ED-31, no 11, Nov. 1984, pp 1549-1555. In it the author explains how his invention of DRAM came about and he chronicles the evolution of DRAM technology from 1967 through 1984. In that period, he reports, there was a lot of circuit and architectural innovation in a very competitive environment, with little documentation in the public literature. View full abstract»

    Open Access
  • 14. A JSSC classic paper: Low-power CMOS digital design

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1553 KB)  

    This article is one of a series on the most frequently cited papers from the JSSC according to The Journal Citation Report-Science Edition. “Low-power CMOS digital design” by A. P. Chandrakasan, S. Sheng, and R. W. Brodersen originally appeared in April 1992. It is the second most frequently cited in the history of JSSC and is still the most recent paper of any frequently cited from JSSC. View full abstract»

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  • 15. Computer Architecture and Amdahl's Law

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 4 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (737 KB)  

    In this thumbnail autobiography, Dr. Amdahl describes his early career, beginning with a serendipitous programming assignment as a graduate student in physics at the University of Wisconsin in 1950 and culminating in the formulation of "Amdahl's Law" in 1967. View full abstract»

    Open Access
  • 16. Moore's Law – The Genius Lives On

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 18 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (443 KB)  

    Walking through the four decades since Gordon Moore made his wonderful prediction: The 1970's was the era of invention; the 1980's, the era of scaling and manufacturing science, making Moore's Law viable and affordable. The 1990's was an era of manufacturing and speed. As we enter the 21st century, the challenge is to exploit the transistor integration capacity provided by Moore's Law, deliver increasingly higher performance, and yet stay within the power limits imposed in each platform segment. View full abstract»

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  • 17. Tales of the continuum: a subsampled history of analog circuits

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 38 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1492 KB)  

    This whirlwind survey of analog computation pays tribute to the MA702, MA709, LM1 LM101A, MA741 and subsequent contributions of Robert J. Widlar,"the father" of analog integrated ciruits and explores his influence on collaborators and succesors including Paul Brokaw, Dave Fullagar, George Erdi, Hans Camenzind, Bill Hewlett, Dave Packard, and Barrie Gilbert. By Thomas H. Lee. View full abstract»

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  • 18. Design of micron MOS switching devices

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 35
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (111 KB)  

    Summary form only only given, as follows. Modern photolithographic technology offers the capability of fabricating MOSFET devices of micron dimensions and less. It is by no means obvious that such small devices can be designed with suitable electrical characteristics for LSI switching applications. In this talk we will describe short-channel devices (Leff ~ l μ) designed by scaling down larger devices with desirable electrical characteristics. Lateral and vertical dimensions, doping level, and operating voltages and currents are scaled in a self-consistent fashion. In this way small devices have been fabricated without the usual deleterious effects associated with short channels. The measured characteristics of these short-channel devices and the larger devices from which they were scaled will be compared. The scaling procedure helps to better understand the limitations of miniaturization of MOS devices. Significant problems are encountered when operating voltages become comparable to the band gap which cannot be scaled within the silicon technology. The subthreshold characteristic of the device then becomes an important consideration. [This reprint (and two more from 1973 and 1974) show the difference between conference and journal reporting in the 1970s. When the concept of scaling first saw the light of day at IEDM in 1972, only an abstract remained as an archive report. By 1973, the IEDM Digest provided a broader overview of Dennard's report. Dennard's 1974 explanation of scaling turned out to be the most cited article in the 51 year history of the JSSC, close to 700 times, according to the last count in 2005 by the independent citation report firm, Thomson ISI.] View full abstract»

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  • 19. Progress in digital integrated electronics [Technical literaiture, Copyright 1975 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission. Technical Digest. International Electron Devices Meeting, IEEE, 1975, pp. 11-13.]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 36 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (155)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (218 KB)  

    This article is reprinted from the Internaional Electron Devices Meeting (1975). It discusses the complexity of integrated circuits, identifies their manufacture, production, and deployment, and addresses trends to their future deployment. View full abstract»

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  • 20. 0-60 GHz in four years: 60 GHz RF in digital CMOS

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 5 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (482 KB)  

    In early 2001, most researchers were focusing on the spectrum from 1-5 GHz, with a few isolated research groups pushing circuits up to 24 GHz. The suggestion to exploit 60 GHz with CMOS seemed comic to some but the availability of nearly universal unlicensed spectrum was the obvious motivation. The Berkeley Wireless Research Center has succeeded in developing an extended BSIM3 model, a library of active and passive devices, and demonstrated the world fastest CMOS amplifier at 104 GHz. View full abstract»

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  • 21. A JSSC classic paper: Sigma-Delta converters

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (73 KB)  

    The 1988 classic paper by Bernhard E. Boser and Bruce A. Wooley, “The design of sigma-delta modulation analog-to-digital converters,” joins the Web list of frequently cited articles from the JSSC (sscs.org/jssc/top-cites.htm). The list contains Journal articles that have been cited more than 100 times according to the recently updated Scientific Index published by Thomson ISI. There are only 26 articles on this list out of over 7,000 JSSC published articles, making it a singular honor to be included. View full abstract»

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  • 22. The History of DRAM Circuit Designs – At the Forefront of DRAM Development –

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 27 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (708 KB)  

    Dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) has been the only high-density RAM used for over 30 years despite many attempts to replace it. Contributing to IT advances to this day, it has achieved an unprecedented six-fold increase in memory capacity in the last three decades. The author surveys the history of DRAM circuit design in this paper, based on his career at the forefront of DRAM development from its inception in 1970 through the present. View full abstract»

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  • 23. A precise four-quadrant multiplier with subnanosecond response

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 29 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1196 KB)  

    Reprinted from the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 3, No. 4 (1968), pp. 365-373. Among the most signficant presentations in the 50-year history of the ISSCC, Barrie Gilbert's classic paper has become the fifth most frequently cited JSSC article and the first to be cited over 100 times. His brilliant insight was in recognizing that the dependability of a bipolar transistor's nonlinearity can be exploited to realize exceptionally linear systems. View full abstract»

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  • 24. Recollections on MOSFET Scaling

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 19 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (617 KB)  

    In mid-1970, Bob Dennard , Fritz Gaensslen and Larry Kuhn formalized the constant-field scaling theory and its limitations. Bob Dennard went on to contribute profoundly to the demonstration of the feasibility of MOSFET scaling and led the way into implementation in real products. Scaled CMOS has become the dominant technology for digital and many analog applications and will continue to be a fundamental driving force of the industry for years to come. View full abstract»

    Open Access
  • 25. A JSSC classic paper: The Gilbert cell, the linear mixer with gain, in CMOS or bipolar

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1505 KB)  

    The Gilbert cell, initially designed with bipolar transistors to operate as a precision multiplier, is widely used in modern communication systems as a mixer and frequency translator. The Gilbert cell offers advantages such as high conversion gain and high port-to-port isolation. Its principle of operation is technology independent and can be realized in bipolar or CMOS processes. Because of their low fabrication costs, Gilbert cells are appropriate for high-level integration and realize good high-frequency performance. Manolis T. Terrovitis and Robert G. Meyer summarized these traits that make the Gilbert cell so popular in recent papers in the June 1999 and October 2000 JSSC. View full abstract»

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  • 26. Recent JSSC articles are classics

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (53 KB)  

    The list of most cited JSSC articles has been updated with a 58% increase in since the last 2003 update. The list, dubbed Classics, includes all JSSC articles cited by authors more than 100 times according to Thomson ISI, a publisher noted for presenting quantifiable statistical data that provides a systematic, objective way to evaluate the world's leading journals and their impact and influence in the global research community. Each highly cited JSSC article title in the list is linked directly to the abstract and full text in IEEE Xplore. Recently added articles are labeled in the online list. View full abstract»

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  • 27. A JSSC classic paper: The Gilbert cell (continued from January 2003 issue)

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1522 KB)  

    In the last column about the genesis of the first translinear multiplier “core,” an attempt was made to capture the series of events that led up to its discovery. Here, that account is aided by presenting the actual circuit forms, and is extended by a discussion of the reasons for its importance when it was first reported at the 1968 ISSCC and in two linked articles in the December 1968 JSSC, “A new wide-band amplifier technique,” and in the fifth most cited article in the JSSC, “A precise four-quadrant multiplier with subnano-second response.” Also, an explanation of its continued value during the intervening thirty-five years to the present is given. View full abstract»

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  • 28. So many articles, so little time: Web site feature brings rich content of JSSC to readers

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 11 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2807 KB)  

    “So Many Articles, So Little Time” affords busy engineers new ways to use the Journal of Solid State Circuits. Engineers and other researchers can now filter the Journal in four distinct ways using the site: JSSC Bests, JSSC Classics, JSSC Tutorials, and JSSC Zeitgeist. A link to IEEE Xplore® launches a new window, members authenticate, and the full text article is presented. From tutorials to cutting-edge conference papers, this gateway service saves time and provides value-added content that goes beyond the original print. View full abstract»

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  • 29. It's about Time: A Brief Chronology of Chronometry

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 42 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1780 KB)  

    The evolution of clock making, recounted in this article by Thomas H. Lee, advanced dramatically after low-power, quartz-controlled watches were first developed by Eric Vittoz and others at the Centre Electronique Horloger (CEH) over forty years ago. Due in great part to their work, even the least expensive wristwatches today are so precise that the need for better stability no longer drives their evolution. Instead, the ability to integrate more functions per unit volume explains why many watches are becoming multipurpose information appliances including PDAs, infrared remote controls, pagers, radios, TVs, walkie-talkies and MP3 players. In the future, low-power will become increasingly important as engineers struggle to address the constrained power budgets of the wristwatch form factor. View full abstract»

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  • 30. A JSSC classic paper: The lowest Vdd for CMOS was defined in 1972

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1569 KB)  

    The April 1972 article by R. M. Swanson and James Meindl from the JSSC “Ion-implanted complementary MOS transistors in low-voltage circuits” was noted as among the most cited articles according to the Journal Citation Report 2000 Science Edition. With 128 citations, the article is among the top 10 most frequently cited since the Journal's inception in 1966. View full abstract»

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  • 31. A perspective on the theory of MOSFET scaling and its impact

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 27 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (835 KB)  

    For more than two decades following the publication of the MOSFET scaling theory, CMOS engineers focused their efforts on scaling down the physical size of CMOS transistors. The opportunity for scaled CMOS to break into high-end applications came when the industry worked together to established voltage standards below 5 volt. Two of the limits of CMOS scaling were reached in the early 2000's: high tunneling current through the thin gate insulator and high device off current. Today, device engineers focus primarily on technology innovations for continued device performance improvement from one generation to the next. View full abstract»

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  • 32. Complementary-MOS Low-Power Low-Voltage Integrated Binary Counter

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 61 - 65
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    In May 1962, Dr. Eric Vittoz was the first electrical engineer hired by Centre Electronique Horloger (CEH), the research laboratory founded in Neuchatel, Switzerland by several organizations representing most of the Swiss watch industry. This paper represents Dr. Vittoz's early work there on an integrated complementary MOS-transistor binary counter stage realized in monolithic form, which allowed p-channel and n-channel MOSTs to be grouped together within two distinct surface areas, resulting in a reduction of the surface necessary for given circuit functions. The integrated frequency divider was used in the first prototypes of electronic watches. View full abstract»

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  • 33. A JSSC classic paper: Sigma-Delta converters

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 8 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (57 KB)  

    Published in the December 1988 JSSC, “The Design of Sigma-Delta Modulation Analog-to-Digital Converters,” by Bernhard E. Boser and Bruce A. Wooley, is a classic article. It has been cited more than 100 times according the Journal Citation Report, 2003 Science Edition. For more classic, often-cited articles from the Journal of SolidState Circuits see the Web site sscs.org/jssc/top-cites.htm. View full abstract»

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  • 34. Microwatt Switched Capacitor Circuit Design: Prepared for a Summer Course at K.U. Leuven, 1981

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 35 - 48
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    Summer Course on Switched Capacitor Circuits, June 9-12, 1981, K. U. Leuven Eric Vittoz prepared this seminal paper in 1981 for a summer course at K.U.Leuven. After reviewing the behavior of MOS devices at very low current, it examines the CMOS implementation of the three basic components of SC circuits (switches, matched capacitors, amplifiers), and weighs the tradeoffs between low power, settling time, and noise considerations. View full abstract»

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  • 35. Highlights of DAC at ISSCC

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 5
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    Last year, ISSCC introduced Sunday evening sessions in which experts were invited to present the state of the art in topics of special interest. This year, one of these Sunday evening sessions featured papers from the 39th Design Automation Conference (DAC) that was held in June 2002. Papers were selected based on their technical excellence as well as their relevance and interest to ISSCC attendees. The goal was to give attendees a look at some of the latest developments in design tools and methodologies. A similar special session of ISSCC papers will be held June 2003 at DAC, in which DAC attendees will have the chance to hear selected papers from this year's ISSCC. View full abstract»

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  • 36. The Wider Impact of Moore's Law

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 28 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (181 KB)  

    Three very large, independent phenomena, i.e. the enormous growth of the semiconductor industry, the commoditization of the computer industry and the emergence of a huge software industry have created the economic framework that has held Moore's Law in place for so long. Moore's Law has become an economic law expressing the rate at which each product generation lasts long enough to be (marginally) profitable for the systems vendors, and yet provides new product introductions to customers at a pace at which they will consider them seriously. View full abstract»

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  • 37. A JSSC classic paper: All-MOS charge-redistribution A/D conversion technique

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 7 - 8
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    This sixth most frequently cited JSSC article by Jim McCreary and Paul Gray at UC Berkeley, appeared in December 1975. McCreary recalls the background impact and legacy. View full abstract»

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  • 38. Razavi speaks in Taiwan about “A new receiver architecture for multi-antenna systems”

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 11
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    Dr. Behzad Razavi of the University of California, Los Angeles presented a talk on “A New Receiver Architecture for Multi-Antenna Systems” at the National Chiao-Tung University, Department of Electronics in Hsichu, Taiwan on 3 November 2005. View full abstract»

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  • 39. The silicon that moves and feels small living things

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 4 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1598 KB)  

    The silicon microelectronic chips that make today's computers possible are emerging as powerful tools for rapid and sensitive analysis of small biological objects, including cells, proteins, DNA, and viruses. Major new and exciting developments in the interface of solid-state circuits and biological entities are discussed in this article. View full abstract»

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  • 40. Advances in Ultra-Low-Voltage Design

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 20 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1770 KB)  

    The idea of exploiting weak-inversion operation for low power, pioneered by Dr. Eric Vittoz in the 1960's, has led to many recent advances in sub-threshold circuit design, described in this paper by MIT's Anantha Chandrakasan and Joyce Kwong. In the near future, exciting new applications such as medical monitoring, toxic gas sensors and next-generation portable video gadgets in a number of systems will be powered by energy scavenging technologies that will require electronic circuits to operate with the utmost energy efficiency. View full abstract»

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  • 41. ISSCC museum

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 6
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    Imagine that a group of SSCS experts have identified 70 outstanding articles in the history of Solid-State Circuits, have summarized the articles, and are showcasing them free of charge on a virtual museum. It is a museum of 70 ideas that spans over 50 years of solid-state circuits history. View full abstract»

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  • 42. Semiconductor Device-and-Lead Structure, Reprint of U.S. Patent 2,981,877 (Issued April 25, 1961. Filed July 30, 1959)

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 34 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Robert Noyce, who co-founded Fairchild Semiconductor in 1957 with seven others including Jean Hoerni and Gordon E. Moore, and went on to found Intel with Moore in 1968, received Patent No. 2,981,877 in 1961 for the first monolithic integrated circuit made of silicon. He and J.S. Kilby are recognized as co-inventors of the integrated circuit. Noyce received the President's National Merit of Science Award in 1979 for his work, as did J.S. Kilby in 1969. Read all seven pages of the original patent filing. View full abstract»

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  • 43. The beginning of translinear circuit design

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 6 - 7
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    In the autumn of 1954, I met my lifetime companion and partner, whom we'll identify just by the initials “BJT,” at a research lab in the south of England. After a decade of deepening familiarity and joyous discovery together, we moved to Oregon, to continue our adventures at Tektronix. This company, dedicated to fashioning the world's finest oscilloscopes, took the unusual step in 1965 of establishing an integrated circuit production line, to support future instrumentation. View full abstract»

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  • 44. Overview of CMOS Technology Development in the MIRAI Project

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 9 - 17
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    Funded by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, the Millennium Research for Advanced Information Technology Project (MIRAI) provided technology solutions for the half-pitch 65nm technology node in its 1st Phase (2001-2003), and half-pitch 45nm and beyond in its 2nd Phase(2004-2007). Phase 3 will provide technical solutions for ultrascaled CMOS, nano-silicon integration and EUV lithography. View full abstract»

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  • 45. Turning students on to circuits

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 6 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    When one compares today's students to those of earlier generations, the differences are striking. Yet the way most of us teach has essentially remained unchanged since the middle of the past century. No wonder, then, that our students are not attracted to electrical engineering or, among those who are, many are disappointed and just drag along, or even drop out. In this article we discuss what can be done to turn things around. Parts of this article draw on an earlier one on an introductory EE class. View full abstract»

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  • 46. Impact of scaling and the scaling development environment

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 31 - 32
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    Dr. Robert Dennard's 1974 paper looked rather simple at first and did not attract much attention at Toshiba. It wasn't until CMOS acquired dominance in the mainstream of integrated circuit (IC) design that scaling theory became the physics-based guiding principle for Moore's Law to continue. Without scaling theory, the author doubts that Moore's Law could have survived for more than three decades. It was the first attempt to couple geometry shrink with other important factors such as power-delay products, on-chip interconnect performance and integration density. View full abstract»

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  • 47. The (pre-) history of the integrated circuit: a random walk

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 16 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Return to the world of coherers, crystals, catwhiskers, point contacts, and Chilean copper rectifiers. Follow the random path of semiconductor advances made without fundamental understanding. Grow in the confidence that all the good stuff has NOT already been invented. The microprocessor consumes 100 watts, switching at pico-seconds while your brain consumes just 20 to 25 watts, and operates at microcroseconds. Nature shows us there's plenty of advances left. View full abstract»

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  • 48. Listen to Gordon Moore talk about Moore's Law

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 12
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    The 40th anniversary of Moore's Law is approaching in 2005. Penned in 1965 in Electronics magazine, Moore's initial prediction that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit would double annually has been referenced and discussed often in the industry and in the financial press. It was Carver Mead at Cal Tech who called it a law, as if it were a fundamental principal of science or economics. And the behavior of the industry has progressed accordingly. Often IC firms used it to set design goals in their general drive for process and product improvement. View full abstract»

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  • 49. Symposium on VLSI circuits meets in June

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1 - 3
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    The International Symposium on VLSI Circuits will be held on June 16–18th, 2005 at the Rihga Royal Hotel, Kyoto, Japan. The Symposium consists of three days of technical presentations and informal evening rump sessions on VLSI circuit design. Following tradition, the Symposium on VLSI Circuits will follow the Symposium on VLSI Technology at the same location. View full abstract»

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  • 50. 2003 Symposium on VLSI circuits

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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    The International Symposium on VLSI Circuits will meet 12–14 June 2003 at the Rihga Royal Hotel, Kyoto, Japan. The Symposium consists of three days of technical presentations and informal evening rump sessions. The Symposium on VLSI Technology precedes the Circuits Symposium at the same hotel, and the one-day overlap in the schedules for the Technology and Circuits meetings features a circuit Short Course on low-power RF design, as well as a joint rump session. The two Symposia cover the two major technical areas of interest in the industry and academia around the world. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 2008. The current retitled publication is IEEE Solid-State Circuits Magazine.

Full Aims & Scope