By Topic

Popular Articles (March 2015)

Includes the top 50 most frequently downloaded documents for this publication according to the most recent monthly usage statistics.
  • 1. New ways to pay [Communications Near Field]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 32 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1353 KB)  

    The way consumers pay for goods has evolved for years, and contactless payment is the just the latest in convenience, but will it ever gain full acceptance? Contactless payment, also dubbed wave and pay' or 'tap and go', offers consumers a different method of paying for lower-valued goods, at £20 and under. Ironically though, `contactless' does not always mean contactless. Transactions require close and sometimes physical contact using a contactless-enabled card or near-field communication (NFC) smartphone over a contactless reader. Credit card companies have issued their own contactless offerings, such as PayPass (Mastercard) and PayWave (Visa), while Barclaycard has taken things a step further and released PayTag - an NFC-equipped sticker that can turn any mobile phone into a contactless payment device. Mobile phone vendors such as HTC, Samsung, Google and LG have manufactured NFC-enabled handsets as an alternative method of payment. Though Apple's involvement in contactless payment has so far been non-existent, it is rumoured that the US Patent and Trademark Office has issued the company a patent for a system that uses NFC for its speculated `iWallet', a feature reportedly planned for the iPhone 5S. View full abstract»

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  • 2. Not-so-humble raspberry pi gets big ideas

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 30 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1774 KB)  

    As the Raspberry Pi celebrates its first birthday, designs intended for the hobbyist are getting mainstream attention from developers of 'grown up' applications. Few items of electronic hardware have engendered quite as much enthusiasm as the compact, single-board computer developed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation with the aim of encouraging basic computer science in schools. Had it had been for sale in shops, the queues would probably have outstripped those around Apple stores in the earlier days of the iPhone and iPad. The Pi - and other hardware like it - is reinvigorating the world of electronic design; but the project started out with fairly limited ambitions, with its founders hoping that it would simply fill a gap in education. As the Raspberry Pi celebrates its first birthday - and one million units shipped - there are several indications that its value is being readily exploited by developers of 'grown up' products who see it as a cheap (circa £25) and effective way of getting compute power into a range of commercial-class solutions requirements. View full abstract»

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  • 3. The M2M connection

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 39 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (994 KB)  

    The machine-to-machine applications market needs a way to communicate, and the communications sector is busy finding different ways to help it. Networked wireless communications: the M2M applications world is gagging for it. There are plenty of communications options in existence, of course; but are they suitable for connecting the wonderful world of cyber-physical systems? Applications and services to vitalise the machine-to-machine (M2M) market are evidenced by the emerging range of devices prefixed with the word `smart', but until comms networks that will enable them to connect to each other are up and running M2M's full potential remains unrealised. However, several initiatives are underway. View full abstract»

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  • 4. It's war - but not as we know it - [control robotics]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 40 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (890 KB)  

    Intelligent machines deployed on battlefields around the world-from mobile grenade launchers to rocket-firing drones-can already identify and lock onto targets without human help. The first three armed combat robots fitted with large-calibre machine guns deployed to Iraq last summer, manufactured by US arms maker Foster-Miller, proved so successful that 80 more are on order, says Sharkey. But, up to now, a human hand has been required to push the button or pull the trigger. "Military leaders are quite clear that they want autonomous robots as soon as possible, because they are more cost- effective and give a risk-free war. To the extent that military robots can considerably reduce unethical conduct on the battlefield- greatly reducing human and political costs - there is a compelling reason to pursue their development as well as to study their capacity to act ethically, it reads. View full abstract»

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  • 5. Beam it down

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 76 - 79
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5143 KB)  

    In this paper, John C. Mankins an expert in space solar power discusses the possibility of beaming solar power from space to earth by means of solar power satellites. The solar power satellite is a large platform positioned in space in a high earth orbit that continuously collects and converts solar energy into electricity. View full abstract»

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  • 6. Journey to the centre of big data

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 56 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3796 KB)  

    In a general context big data is an aggregation of data sets that are so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using readily available database management tools or traditional data processing applications. This challenge also contains an opportunity for commercial organisations that are equipped to find ways to use it - or elements of it - to inform and enhance revenue drivers (see 'Puzzling out big data', E&T Vol 7 Issue 12). The term 'big data' is partly a recognition of the growing relative weight and importance of unstructured data not amenable to conventional database analytics and reporting tools and techniques. Above all, though, it embodies an ambition to extract value from data, particularly for sales, marketing, and customer relations. View full abstract»

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  • 7. Easy as pi

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 34 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1965 KB)  

    Education secretary Michael Gove plans to introduce a new IT curriculum that focuses more on computer science and less on secretarial skills. The British education system is notoriously slow to embrace change, though. Whether it's today's children who will benefit or the children of future generations remains to be seen. Something that may speed things up, though, is the new computer that looks like the sort of thing the geek might keep in his den, but sounds like something served up in the school canteen. The Raspberry Pi is an uncased, credit-card sized computer that can run off the mains or from a portable battery. Developer the Raspberry Pi Foundation says that it is individual children, not their schools, who will be given the computers. At schools, or at home, the kids will be able to use the Raspberry Pi like a desktop PC for gaming, spreadsheets, word-processing and to play videos. Also like a desktop, their new machine will connect to TVs, games consoles and keyboards. View full abstract»

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  • 8. Puzzling out big data [Information Technology Analytics]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 56 - 60
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2973 KB)  

    Big data comes in many forms. It comes as customer information and transactions contained in customer-relationship management and enterprise resourceplanning systems and HTML-based web stores. It comes as information generated by machine-to-machine applications collecting data from smart meters, manufacturing sensors, equipment logs, trading systems data and call detail records compiled by fixed and mobile telecommunications companies. Big data can come with big differences. Some say that the `three Vs' of big data should more properly be tagged as the `three HVs': high-volume, high-variety, high-velocity, and high-veracity. Apply those tags to the mountains of information posted on social network and blogging sites, including Facebook, Twitter and VouTube; the deluge of text contained in email and instant messages; not to mention audio and video files. It is evident then that it's not necessarily the 'big-ness' of information that presents big-data applications and services with their greatest challenge, but the variety and the speed at which all that constantly changing information must be ingested, processed, aggregated, filtered, organised and fed back in a meaningful way for businesses to get some value out of it. View full abstract»

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  • 9. The Raspberry Pi single-board computer will revolutionise computer science teaching [For & Against]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 26
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (558 KB)  

    The Raspberry Pi's inventors and manufacturers – or at least their PR people – seem to be claiming that this new singleboard device will revolutionise the way pupils learn about computing, programming and technology at school. View full abstract»

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  • 10. Smart dust

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 74 - 77
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1898 KB)  

    How smart can a city be? Could it tell you where to park your car? Could it guide your car to a vacant space by communicating with your sat-nav system? And is it smart enough to inform you of how many eco-brownie points you have earned by following its advice? All these things are feasible in a smart city model, but for these technological metabolisms to work they need some sort of tiny endpoint monitoring device, probably MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) based, that will feed back the basic information about what is happening on the ground ?? or in the air - 'eyes', 'ears', and 'noses', in effect, that will feed back the basic information. View full abstract»

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  • 11. Google world

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 33 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4331 KB)  

    The world of Google seems such a fertile place, bursting with creativity in its ever-expanding population of Web tools and services. But this simple, colourful, unassuming hemisphere is backed with a murkier side, crawling with troubled, critical users and vexed regulators, legislators and watchdogs. On closer inspection, and for all its brand perfection, Google's corporate remit is difficult to define. Can the two sides be reconciled? Indeed, does Google??s world reveal the shape of corporate strategies to come? View full abstract»

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  • 12. Bad... in a good way [Information Technology Security]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 64 - 68
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2140 KB)  

    More and more organisations are being targeted in cyber-attacks, and they must get to know their enemy if they are to protect vital networks. Meet the professional, ethical hacker. View full abstract»

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  • 13. Driverless cars face urban challenge

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 16
    Save to Project icon | PDF file iconPDF (752 KB)  
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  • 14. Make it to fake it

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 38 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (357 KB)  

    While they may be predicted to disrupt current manufacturing models, 3D printing technologies are slowly beginning to infiltrate the consumer market. However, the term 3D printing conjures up images that the technology will be as simple to use as a normal inkjet or laser printer. This is far from the truth. Firstly, you will be dealing with the kind of issues that anyone has to deal with when creating solid objects. This will, among other things, require a significant amount of knowledge of computer-aided design (CAD) principles, which will require the user to invest time in developing their ideas into 3D objects that they intend to commercialise or use for personal consumption. Nevertheless, 3D printing has captured the imagination of many would-be designers. Inventors can now see an easy avenue into bringing their designs and inventions to life in order to demonstrate them to the world, or to simply create one-off products for themselves which would never have mass market appeal. 3D printing may seem surprisingly straightforward, but there are moral, business and technical issues that must be addressed before it becomes a part of everyday life. View full abstract»

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  • 15. The reality of cyber terrorism

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 36 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (976 KB)  

    The paper is talking about cyber attacks and its complications to industrial control systems. The Stuxnet threat poses blueprint for attacks on real-world infrastructure, providing generic methods to reprogram industrial control systems. View full abstract»

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  • 16. Internet of things brave new world [Communications Manufacturing]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 80 - 83
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1069 KB)  

    EVEN THOUGH IT'S getting very close, we're not quite there yet. According to Thomas Svensson, senior vice president, EMEA, at Thingworx ¿¿¿ a technology company that has created a software platform specifically to build and run innovative machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) applications - we are on the point of taking intelligence "to a whole new level". But it's not just the technological intelligence that needs to be taken up a level. The thinking and approach of the manufacturing sector needs to be modernised too. "Manufacturing has traditionally been very conservative. It tends to still use lots of analogue tools for tracking performance. It needs to take advantage of new solutions to connect and perform better. The new technologies will soon be more available, cheaper and commoditised," says Svensson. View full abstract»

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  • 17. Thin on the ground

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 74 - 77
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1294 KB)  

    It doesn't seem so long ago that analysts were predicting a 'thin-client revolution' where function-fatted desktop PCs would be replaced by leaner, greener terminals that almost harked back to the original tenets of centralised computing. While organisations buy fewer standard PCs and laptops for their desktops, the rise of enterprise mobility has meant that the thin-client market has not taken over the desktop computing requirement as some predicted. View full abstract»

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  • 18. The spark of invention

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 67 - 69
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (183 KB)  

    Seventy years after his death, the mystery sυrrουnding electrical engineer Nikola Tesla - particularly his claim to have invented a 'death ray' - is s arking the imagination of movie makers. There's a car company named after him. And an airport, a telecommunications group, a computer graphics processor, a social transformation conference, even a rock band. Scientist, engineer, inventor, futurist and all round genius; Tesla died 70 years ago. Born in 1856 in Smiljan, Croatia. then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, to Serb parents, he worked in the USA from 1884 onwards. All three countries claim Tesla as their own. So too do the champions of wireless communication, free energy and sustainable living. Those who dream of socialist utopias and complain about capitalist conspiracies see Tesla as one of theirs, as do capitalist entrepreneurs like Tesla Motors' founder Elon Musk and the company's financial backers, Sergey Brin and Larry Page of Google fame, and former eBay president Jeff Skoll. In Croatia, mobile communications giants Ericsson is called <; Ericsson Nikola Tesla in a nod to its former countryman. There are societies, foundations, clubs and centres all over the world dedicated to a man who filed 278 patents in 26 countries, gave the world its system for directing alternating current and inspired the development of radio. Tesla also invented an energy weapon, created lightning, claimed to be able to pluck energy from the air, and apparently had a machine that created earthquakes - making him intriguing enough for novelists, film makers, comicbook writers and TV producers to use as a fictional character. So, how can one man be so influential in so many, often diametrically opposed, fields? View full abstract»

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  • 19. Bridge of sighs [COMMS Monitoring]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 69 - 71
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1304 KB)  

    When the Minnesota Bridge over the Mississippi river collapsed during an evening rush hour in August 2007, killing 13 people and injuring 145, the parlous state of America's civil infrastructure became headline news. Far from this being a rare event, apparently more than 130 American bridges collapsed between 1989 and 2000: that's about one a month. Europe's bridges seem more robust than those of the US, thanks to a more rigorous approach to inspection. Nevertheless, in August 2009 commuters using the BelfastDublin rail line had a lucky escape when part of a viaduct fell into the sea just after a train carrying 50 passengers had crossed it. Thankfully the train driver spotted subsidence and raised the alarm to halt any other trains on the line. Such catastrophic failures are boosting interest in embedding permanent sensors and communications links into all kinds of infrastructure to monitor it for structural deterioration. While safety is the main incentive, there is growing interest in how these techniques could extend the life of structures on the basis that the 'greenest' infrastructure is likely to be the infrastructure you repair rather than replace. View full abstract»

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  • 20. Why the BYOD boom is changing how we think about business it

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 28
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (697 KB)  

    BYOD, or 'bring your own device', is the latest IT buzz acronym. Although the idea's been around for a while, there is a real shift towards allowing employees to use consumer-type devices in the workplace that marks a step change in the way people consume and think of business IT. View full abstract»

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  • 21. Interview [Design and Production 3D Printing]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 38 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1648 KB)  

    "THESE COFFEE CUPS are pretty bog-standard. A tin glaze, ??6 or ??7 to produce." Ceramicist Shane Williams is making a point: the lone potter can't compete with the mass market these days. He's been diversifying. He was up till 3am last night. Not on his wheel but trying to get parts of the 3D printer that he has built working. His is an invention that could see people printing at home cheaply and from varied materials. But more of that later. View full abstract»

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  • 22. Iridium reborn [Comms Iridium]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 64 - 65
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2022 KB)  

    The Iridium satellite communications system has had a chequered history. Conceived when it was still unclear whether cellular telephony would take off, by the time its constellation of low-earthorbiting satellites was in place, the popularity of mobile phones was growing and Iridium's potential market was shrinking. View full abstract»

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  • 23. Drone rangers [Africa Special Sustainability]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 60 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1311 KB)  

    The article presents the effort of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), through the use of its Global Impact Award from Google, to adapt and help governments implement specialised aerial surveillance systems and affordable wildlife tagging technology, coupled with cost-effective ranger patrolling guided by analytical software, to increase the detection and deterrence of poaching in four sites in Asia and Africa. View full abstract»

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  • 24. UAVs in the wild

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 33 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (197 KB)  

    As UAVs are becoming widely used by conservationists, some countries are trying to ban them on ethical grounds. Just when you thought it was safe to stop talking about UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) as something that conservationists and authorities might one day use to stop poachers killing animals and start talking about drones as something actually being used to catch poachers, African governments have started banning them. View full abstract»

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  • 25. The state vs the people

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 43 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB)  

    This summer of 2013 brought into focus a conflict that has lurked in the background for over a decade. The individual's right to privacy versus his or her security is now officially on society's agenda. The line between protection and prying has never been more blurred. This is most apparent on the the Internet - that vexed playground that offers unprecedented potential for both freedom (to the point of lawlessness) and protection (to the point of oppression). Privacy may well be a human right but recently it clashed with the requirement for liberal democracies to defend themselves. It all boils down to the fact that, in order to prevent future terrorist attacks, security agencies need to accumulate large quantities of data from cyberspace and analyse it preventively for patterns, suspects and possible connections. Infringements on privacy are justified by balancing them against the greater good of security. The Internet expansion, witnessed in the 1990s, and the culture of freedom it created were made possible by its technological underpinnings (open and standard protocols, for instance), by opening up the infrastructure to commercial activities, the governance model and the initial absence of laws and regulations aided by the free software revolution. All of this should not be taken for granted: it can be endangered, and that's exactly what is happening. View full abstract»

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  • 26. Car safety with a digital dashboard

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 60 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (428 KB)  

    In February this year GM decided to recall more than two million vehicles after finally tracing a serious problem with its cars to a weak spring in the ignition lock. If the key swung too far it could disable the engine and not just cut the power, but put out of action the electrically assisted brakes and steering. View full abstract»

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  • 27. 5G searches for formula to shake off Shannon [Communications Mobile]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 82 - 85
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1333 KB)  

    Experiments in so-called 5G mobile communications have begun. but early indications suggest that it's going to be a fundamentally different kind of cellular network that emerges. View full abstract»

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  • 28. Developing AR APPS

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 52 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1244 KB)  

    The latest technology craze on mobile devices, augmented reality (AR) has been around for many years, predating the era of the smartphone. AR aims to supplement information in layers on top of an actual image, as seen through a mobile device's camera. The resultant image can then be displayed on screen. All of this has been made possible thanks to a number of technologies that are now found on smartphones and tablet devices. These include sensors such as accelerometers and GPS, large clear displays with multitouch capabilities, faster processors and graphic processor units (GPUs), and high Internet speeds. These technologies were not specifically designed with AR in mind. Therefore, the concept will present challenges for any app developers working to create useful software that can truly be described as augmented reality. Over the past few years a number of AR apps have been made available for Android and iOS devices. Many of these are primarily marketing-related and AR is seen as an ideal platform. If you want to find the location of the nearest ATM machine, bank or restaurant, for example, then AR can offer a fun and practical way of finding them. GPS-based applications take advantage of the Global Positioning System (GPS) tools already found in your smartphone. View full abstract»

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  • 29. Digital footprints step up

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 82 - 83
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (727 KB)  

    The expression 'carbon footprint' is commonly used in the public debate on responsibility and immediate action against the threat of global climate change. however, the concept of a digital footprint, though related to carbon expenditure, is less well understood. View full abstract»

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  • 30. The rise and rise of the smart city [Smart Cities Urban Britain]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 72 - 76
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (258 KB)  

    THE UK SHOULD be seen as a world leader, the country not just with the smartest cities but also with the companies that develop the smart technology. This is according to the Smart Cities Forum (SCF), which is all about putting these ambitions front and centre in their drive to make our urban areas better places to live in. With the global market for smart city solutions expected to be worth around $400bn by 2020, the aim of the UK government's initiative is to get the private sector and local governments working together to garner 10 per cent of that value. Science Minister David Willets believes that the UK is well placed to do just that and has to act now to take advantage of the situation. View full abstract»

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  • 31. Air power the rise of electric aircraft

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 77 - 79
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (260 KB)  

    Electrically-Propelled cars are becoming more common on our streets, but what are the prospects for electric aircraft? Can you imagine boarding a Boeing 737 for your summer holiday without the smell of aviation fuel and the roar of jet engines? If the engineers of Airbus Group and its partners have their way, this is exactly what you will be able to do in another 20 years or so. View full abstract»

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  • 32. Sportstech the magic machine [Sports Technology Cricket]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 86 - 87
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1182 KB)  

    The new Merlyn cricket bowling machine from Bola has prevented England from getting in a spin during this summer's Ashes series. The Merlyn is able to deliver a spinning ball, at any pace, to any line, to any length, spinning in any direction, with variable amounts of spin upon demand, from a variety of heights. It is possible to programme Merlyn to repeat deliveries, or to deliver a pre-programmed over. View full abstract»

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  • 33. Smart materials

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 31 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2564 KB)  

    If you thought materials science was mostly about lifeless lumps of metal, think again. Thanks to the rapid development of smart materials over the past two decades, the discipline has really got moving, literally. From colour-changing materials and shape memory textiles to morphing aircraft wings and drug-delivering polymers, what sets these materials apart from your everyday metal, ceramic or polymer, is an ability to respond 'intelligently' to the environment. It all kicked off with a quite remarkable snow-ski in the 1990s. View full abstract»

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  • 34. Energy crisis postponed? [Power Shale Gas]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 88 - 90
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1493 KB)  

    Search for 'fracking' on the Internet and you'll find a host of videos from 'fracking 101' and 'No fracking way' to 'fracking hell', and yes, 'frack off'. This very public backlash against fracking - or hydraulic fracturing, the process of extracting natural gas from shale formations - follows the release of 'Gasland' in January 2010. The oscar-nominated documentary tracks the lives and chronic health problems of US families living in regions where shale gas drilling has taken place. Its claims of groundwater pollution amid images of flaming faucets not only angered US citizens but also roused concern at the White house. Today, the US environmental Protection agency (ePa) is investigating the safety and risk implications of hydraulic fracturing while the New York State Senate has imposed a moratorium halting all practices within its State. other US Senates, as well as canadian province Quebec, are poised to follow and the first legal claims for contamination caused by the drilling have been filed. View full abstract»

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  • 35. Getting a purchase on AR

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 46 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1886 KB)  

    The success of e-commerce has caused retailers to find ways of adopting the personalised interactivity of online shopping to make the offline shopping experience more compelling. To this end augmented reality (AR) could prove the most effective technology for getting potential purchasers to engage - and spend - more. The AR trend aims to build consumer relationships, boost revenue channels, and add value to the shopper experience. The Omni-channel approach relates to how retailers can attract their target consumers across multiple traditional and non-traditional interactions. These include e-tail and e-commerce, use of social media, plus in-store technology such as virtual mirrors and touchscreen digital signage - all integrated in a physical store, and often making use of shoppers' own mobile devices, ranging from tablet PCs to smartphones. View full abstract»

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  • 36. The nuclear heart of Europe

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 65 - 67
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (285 KB)  

    The European organisation for Nuclear Research ??? known by its French acronym CERN ??? was founded on 29 September 1954 with four principles at the heart of its mission: to answer questions about the nature of the universe; to train the scientists of tomorrow; to heal the scars of the Second World War through international collaboration; and, importantly, to advance the frontiers of technology. View full abstract»

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  • 37. Social networking: the business case - [IT internet]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 54 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (918 KB)  

    The tangible fruit of Web 2.0's rather nebulous branches, online social networking-epitomised by Web sites Facebook, Linkedln, MySpace and Twitter-is becoming increasingly pervasive in the enterprise workplace; this is a development that's causing repercussive reactions in the minds of many chief information officers (CIOs). Social networks do have the potential to become business enablers if you get to know them well enough. In this paper, the author explains how. View full abstract»

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  • 38. Bringing the factory home [Manufacturing Personal]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 56 - 58
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1167 KB)  

    Digital technology allows us to manufacture on an ever more local scale. A second industrial revolution could be brewing, with personal fabrication technology enabling people to invent, innovate and learn new skills. Simply teaching people what's possible with advanced digital manufacturing technologies can be a huge enabler for creativity, design and innovation. Digital fabrication is personal fabrication,says FabLab, a worldwide network of easy-access, high-tech workshops. While the technology is just a tool, you still need to be able to design for the process and figure out which process is best for you. View full abstract»

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  • 39. A conscious muddle

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 30 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (114 KB)  

    To decide whether consciousness can be uploaded into a machine, we have to understand first what consciousness is and how it emerges. This is where engineers may need help from philosophers. Professor Emeritus Lynn Trainor, a long-time member of the physics department at the University of Toronto who died earlier this year, is reported as saying: "What fascinates me is this. The egg gets fertilised. The cells start dividing. And then consciousness arises out of it. How?" In his book The Mysterious Flame', British philosopher Colin McGinn argues that the emergence of consciousness in the physical brain is a mystery that we will never unravel. Could he be mistaken? In 'Evolution and Consciousness', Canadian philosopher Leslie Dewart asserts that speech generates consciousness in the race and in every new member of the race. To examine this possibility, we need to differentiate between communication, speech and language. In her book The First Word', Christine Kenneally does a survey of the unsuccessful quests by linguists for the origin of language. But, maybe, linguists are the wrong people looking for the wrong thing? The bodily act of speech long precedes all language, reading, writing, Braille, sign language and all speech substitutes. I listened to a University of Toronto professor speaking about age-related changes in hearing. He referred to the resulting difficulties in language comprehension. But we do not hear language; we hear speech. He went on to refer to "spoken language". He was referring to the act of speech. Even worse, the BBC reported a Lancaster University study of 120 toddlers which found that the ability to perform complex mouth movements was strongly linked to language development. Aren't complex mouth movements linked to the development of speech? Even neurologists are misled when they refer to language centres in the brain. Sufferers of a debilitating stroke soon know that it is the speech centre in the brain that has been affected, regard- ess of the language previously spoken. As Thomas Hobbes writes in 'Of Man': "The most noble and most profitable invention of all other, was that of Speech." He was not confused by the red herring of language. The distinction between speech and language is beauti-fully illustrated in the biblical story of the tower of Babel. The Hebrew Scriptures tell us: "And the Lord said, "Behold they are one people and they have all one language; Come, let us go down, and there confuse theanguage, that they may not understand one another's speech [my italics]"." I am not surprised at the confusion between speech and language. Rather than search fruitlessly for the origin of the latter, we can realistically reconstruct the emergence of speech. If anyone should object that this happened in prehistoric times, let me remind them that Darwin successfully reconstructed the origin of species that took place over billions of years. The emergence of speech is recent by comparison. View full abstract»

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  • 40. How can we smooth out the power supply?

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 60 - 63
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (340 KB)  

    GROWTH OF THE UK's renewable energy generation means power distribution networks are facing unprecedented challenges in managing fluctuations in how much power is coming onto the network and when, due to the unpredictability of generating energy from weather. View full abstract»

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  • 41. Smart home tech

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 46 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1038 KB)  

    Wireless communication may seem like old news with Wi-Fi and 3G readily available, but competition is heating up between companies that want to offer you wireless streaming of audio, photos and even video directly in your home. Sonos offers its ZonePlayer, which, in league with other ZonePlayers, uses a proprietary system called SonosNet to create a wireless network. Each ZonePlayer can communicate with all the others, and share the music and audio content stored there. A controller, which is also looped into SonosNet, tells each ZonePlayer what you want it to play. View full abstract»

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  • 42. BYOD to the classroom

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 42 - 45
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    This paper discusses issues regarding BYOD or bring your own device in schools today. View full abstract»

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  • 43. Connecting the unconnected

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 64 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (240 KB)  

    BY 2020 GLOBAL IoT revenues will be 30 times those of the Internet, according to a prediction from Forrester Research, making it the next trillion-dollar communication industry, linking 25 billion smart devices and intelligent systems in operation around the world. View full abstract»

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  • 44. Shops offer the e-tail experience

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 46 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2109 KB)  

    E-commerce has transformed retail over the last 15 years, but the widely held presumption that online purchasing would spell the demise of bricks-and-mortar shopping has now been supplanted by a more nuanced vision of our shopping future. Recent developments in advanced interactive technology have enabled shrewd retailers to mine the idea that online/offline shopping is not an either/or proposition, and that there is a chance to engage customers in new ways on the physical shopfloor. View full abstract»

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  • 45. High speeds at high speed

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 69 - 71
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    E&T looks at the many ways in which the telecoms and transport industries are converging. Until a few years ago, most of the convergence between the world's transport and telecoms systems involved the use of a single communications technology per application: a radio link between aircraft and control tower; a broadcasting link between radio station and radio car; a global satellite navigation signal tracking the location of a ship; or an electric railway signal alerting train drivers about the status of the line ahead. A more recent trend has seen the design of transport applications that rely on a variety of communications techniques. The phenomenon is the result of the inevitable replication in the transport sector of the convergence that has occurred within the telecoms sector. Convergence in communications is happening on two fronts: at the network and the device levels. Those operators that used to provide phone services to residential and business customers now provide anything from Internet to fixed or mobile voice, mobile data, leased line, IT, network security, multichannel television or home networking services. And mobile phones that used one radio frequency to communicate with cellular base stations are now sophisticated handheld computers featuring several radios for multi-band cellular service, Wi-Fi connectivity, Bluetooth access and GPS tracking, as well as USB connectors for the wired transfer of content. View full abstract»

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  • 46. Smart house

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 42 - 43
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  • 47. Solar flying grows wings - [electronics aviation]

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 32 - 35
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    In this paper, the solar impulse environmentally friendly aeroplane project has entered its final test phase after the unveiling of its first prototype. View full abstract»

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  • 48. The changing face of the white continent

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 42 - 45
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (258 KB)  

    At both ends of the Earth polar ice is melting. To the north, as a reaction to the loss of ice volume, international interest in hydrocarbon exploration is on the increase. But while the race to explore the melting North gathers pace, down south in Antarctica melting land ice is gaining the attention of the extraction industries. The focus is shifting, and the last great wilderness might not be as safe from development as we once thought. View full abstract»

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  • 49. Haute-tech couture - [engineering fashion]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 20 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2602 KB)  

    Wearable technology, however, has grown ambitious. Advances in materials, wireless, computing, sensors and electronics mean engineers are now able to integrate electronics directly into clothing. Systems can now interact with each other, enabling the most innovative applications for sport, fashion, medical and work wear. This requires engineers more at home solving technical issues in industrial design to apply their intellect to the less logic-driven world of fashion. A select group of engineering companies and fashion houses are starting to collaborate to produce wearable electronic garments that are as revolutionary as the first fob watch was 400 years ago. View full abstract»

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  • 50. How to ...... land a human on Mars

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 40 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1233 KB)  

    With Curiosity last year becoming the fourth rover to land on Mars, how long will it be before a human walks on the Red Planet? View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Engineering & Technology is the IET's flagship magazine featuring analysis, news, innovation announcements, job advertisements and careers advice.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dickon Ross
IET