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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Nov 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • Node and mesh analysis by inspection

    Page(s): 312 - 316
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    This paper shows how to write node or mesh analysis linear circuit equations by inspection of the circuit schematic diagram and obtains two different matrix solutions of these equations. The linear circuit can have resistances or impedances, controlled sources, ideal operational amplifiers, or mutually coupled coils. The first matrix solution finds the node-voltage or mesh-current vector in terms of matrix operations with the inspection matrices. Also, this method gives a matrix solution for any arbitrary output vector in terms of the node-voltage or mesh-current solution vector, the independent-source vector, and the inspection matrices. The second matrix solution method finds the solution for a vector consisting of all node voltages or mesh currents, dependent sources, controlling variables, and any output variable(s) using a single matrix equation. Matrix methods of circuit analysis are now appropriate for student use because of the existence of calculators capable of solving large matrices and the availability of inexpensive math programs for personal computers View full abstract»

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  • Laboratories for an undergraduate course in power electronics

    Page(s): 365 - 369
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    Laboratory exercises to accompany an undergraduate power electronics course are discussed. Topics include inductors, periodic steady state, drive circuits, PWM control, average switch models, and startup. These laboratories present an evolutionary sequence of increasingly difficult, design-oriented power electronics laboratories View full abstract»

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  • Time domain analysis of linear systems using spreadsheets

    Page(s): 317 - 320
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    In this paper, a method for the analysis of linear systems using spreadsheets is presented. This method is based on a spreadsheet pictorial simulation of the mathematical performance of an integrator. At first, a connecting method, using integrators, is used to symbolize different blocks of the system each representing a given transfer function. These blocks are then connected according to the signal flow and the interrelationship existing between them. As a result, the output of the system in response to any given input and any given configuration is evaluated. This method is characterized by its low cost, flexibility, and simplicity View full abstract»

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  • A new course on supercomputers and parallel architectures

    Page(s): 340 - 345
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (660 KB)  

    Parallel processing and distributed computing are two areas attracting a great deal of attention. Several universities and institutions are involved in the teaching of courses on parallel programming, distributed operating systems and parallel algorithms, but very few of them offer a course from the hardware point of view. The course structure presented in this paper gives a considerable emphasis on the hardware for parallel processing. Various topics such as the design of high speed computing devices, hardware design of multiple pipelines, design of a variety of memory configurations, design of an NXN interconnection network and the hardware for systolic architectures and neural network architectures are presented in this course. Students have the opportunity to actually design a distributed shared memory system using IBM PC machines and write software for them. The assignments for the course are in the form of both individual and group projects on the implementation of various schemes for parallel processing such as synchronization mechanisms (e.g., locks and barrier) in hardware. In addition, a group project deals with the design of a pipelined floating point unit. Further, a complementary course on VLSI provides the necessary skills for the students to implement the devices as a VLSI chip. Students also have the opportunity to do hands on work with transputers and develop hardware and software based around them. This course has received good feedback both from academia and industries within Australia View full abstract»

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  • An interdisciplinary senior design course utilizing electronically guided model rockets

    Page(s): 321 - 327
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    Electrical engineering graduates are faced with a wide variety of technological and managerial decisions. The ability of the engineer to interact with the entire spectrum of individuals involved in marketing a product is a critical component of the overall success of a project. A senior level design course is presented that integrates the numerous phases of project development in order to prepare the student for the industrial environment. The course consisted of designing and flight testing an electronically guided model rocket. An analysis of the rockets anticipated flight path was performed using a FORTRAN program which took into account such factors as stability, center of gravity, center of pressure, and engine thrust. The rocket was flight tested for three successful controlled flights and recoveries. Test flight results proved the design of the rocket to be very stable and respond quickly in flight View full abstract»

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  • On the effective use of a cache memory simulator in a computer architecture course

    Page(s): 357 - 360
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    In this paper, we describe how a cache memory simulator can be effectively used to enhance the understanding of cache memories in a computer architecture course. Various types of course assignments that are described in this paper require the use of the simulator to understand effects of varying different cache parameters on the system performance, to analyze cache memory designs, to synthesize cache designs, and to incorporate advanced caching concepts like victim caching, stall caching, and multilevel caching by modifying the simulator. Dinero, a cache simulator available in the public domain, has been enhanced and used in the course. Our experience of using the simulator is described View full abstract»

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  • Application of the integral definition of the curl operator to numerical solutions in electromagnetics

    Page(s): 346 - 349
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    The definition of the curl operator in terms of an integral is shown to lead to a method for numerical solutions that facilitates the use of mixtures of cells having different shapes and different dielectric properties. The derivation is followed by examples for, waveguides, mixtures of different cells, and a method for increasing the accuracy when an equation is known for the field on the outer boundary. Thus, these results suggest that the formal definition of the curl operator has more than pedagogical value. This definition is taught in an undergraduate class at Florida International University View full abstract»

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  • Including the effects of component tolerances in the teaching of courses in introductory circuit design

    Page(s): 361 - 364
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    With the emphasis upon design in electrical and electronics curriculums, the need for coverage in circuit design courses on how manufacturer's tolerances on resistors and capacitors will affect the circuit's response is obvious. This paper develops an analytical procedure useful for the determination of these tolerances that is suitable for use in introductory classes in active and passive circuit analysis and design. The procedure allows the determination of the proper manufacturer's tolerances on the passive components such that a given tolerance on a design parameter will not be exceeded View full abstract»

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  • Charge conservation and the transcapacitance element: an exposition

    Page(s): 376 - 379
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    A simple gedanken experiment is presented to demonstrate the violation of charge (and energy) conservation, as predicted by D.E. Ward (1981), J.J. Paulos and D.A. Antoniadis (1983), and D. Root and B. Hughes (1988), in the two-parameter nonlinear modeling of capacitance. The paradoxes are resolved through examination of a complete physical model of the capacitor. The role of the transcapacitive element in reestablishing charge conservation is explored in this context. Discussion of the software implementation of transcapacitance and its dual, transinductance, is also included View full abstract»

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  • An undergraduate parallel processing laboratory

    Page(s): 306 - 311
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    A modest transputer laboratory was established at the Electrical Engineering Department, Louisiana Tech. University. This laboratory is used to introduce undergraduate electrical engineering students to parallel processing. The author discusses course development and then describes five laboratory experiments: introduction to Express, node analysis, event driven profiling, performance analysis, and matrix multiplication View full abstract»

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  • Factors contributing to difference in performance between small and large sections

    Page(s): 335 - 339
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    Using large sections is a common option for extending scarce faculty resources. However, the students in small sections of an introductory course in computer information systems scored higher on average than students in large sections. This study seeks to identify what factors contribute to the difference in student performance of small and large sections. The analysis uses common exam scores for ten small sections (about 50 students each) and nine large sections (more than 100 students each) to measure the performance difference. The analysis started with sixteen factors. Eight factors were found to contribute significantly to explaining the variation in performance. The significant factors are: individual ability, number of years work experience, previous experience with databases, class category, repeat status, level of math completed, and the instructor. Section size was not a significant factor View full abstract»

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  • Simplifying and extending a useful class of signals and impulse responses

    Page(s): 301 - 305
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB)  

    Mathematics is an essential tool for studying science and engineering, and calculus is one of the most important branches of mathematics for engineering. In this paper a new formula for evaluating ∫xneaxdx and a more generally applicable extension to polynomials are developed. This new approach illustrates the intimate relationship between differentiation and integration, and is simple enough for a freshman taking the first course in calculus to derive it. Although a closed-form expression for this integral exists, it is cumbersome and relatively more difficult to remember than the forms proposed in the paper. Also, the proposed formula readily generalizes to a larger class of polynomials, thus becoming much more useful. We show that these formulae are particularly important for the analysis and use of a broad class of signals commonly encountered in the classroom and in practical situations. The proposed formulae are applied to Fourier Series, Fourier Transforms, Laplace Transforms, and time domain convolution View full abstract»

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  • A protocol test system for the study of sliding window protocols on networked UNIX computers

    Page(s): 328 - 334
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (576 KB)  

    A software-based system for modeling transport layer protocols and observing their behavior and performance in an actual local area network setting is introduced. The simple interface definition provides for rapid prototyping of the flow control, error recovery and connection management features of transport layer protocols. The ability to introduce errors into the communications stream allows for testing in a variety of situations which are troublesome for communications protocols, such as long delays in delivery and acknowledgment, packet loss, and high noise rates. This protocol test system (PTS) is intended as a tool which can provide a practical environment in which students and engineers can develop and study communications protocols, View full abstract»

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  • A novel single-capacitor single-operational-amplifier sinusoidal oscillator

    Page(s): 391 - 393
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    The well known operational amplifier based Schmitt-trigger square wave generator is shown to behave as a sinusoidal oscillator at relatively high frequencies. This is attributed to the widely ignored frequency-dependence characteristic of the differential gain of the operational amplifier. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions View full abstract»

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  • The comparative evaluation of excellence for student awards

    Page(s): 350 - 356
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (660 KB)  

    A recurring problem in the award of academic honors is the comparison of the highest grade achieved by students from different groups with different traditions, practices, and evaluation scales. Group averages are not useful because it is the position of the top student that is of interest, not the average; also, the normal distribution cannot be assumed for the upper tail of the distribution, which must be obtained from the data. We find that the upper grades of each group can be modeled very well, permitting the statistical theory of extremes to be used. From the model which we fit to each group separately, we obtain the probability for a top grade at least as high as the one observed, and from this, we obtain the return period which is the expected interval before the return of a similarly high grade. This return period is a common measure which enables top grades from several disparate groups to be compared on the basis of how rare or exceptional they are as members of their own group. The precision of the return period is estimated from the correlation coefficient of the regression model and used to indicate the effectiveness of the decision in a particular case. The method is applied to data from different disciplines at the University of Waterloo, including comparisons among Engineering Departments View full abstract»

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  • Multilevel logic minimization using K-map XOR patterns

    Page(s): 370 - 375
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    Entered variable XOR patterns are used in compressed Karnaugh maps to achieve gate-level minimum functions not possible with standard SOP and POS forms. Procedures are given for minimum cover extraction and verification. The design of a simple ALU illustrates multilevel-multiple output optimization View full abstract»

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  • Introducing undergraduates to the moment method

    Page(s): 385 - 389
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    Four application problems are presented which have been found to facilitate introductory instruction on numerical methods for undergraduate electrical engineering students. The method of moments (MOM) is introduced at the level of first principles, preparing students for subsequent advanced topics in matrix methods and developments through linear vector space theory. The problems are such that the associated computer programming assignments are straightforward, minimizing distraction from the mathematical concepts. Numerical solutions may be obtained, or verified, with a pocket calculator in some cases. Computer programs to obtain more sophisticated graphics output and to expedite solution of equations with large matrices can be progressively added as supplementary student exercises View full abstract»

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  • The numerical solution of Poisson's equation in a pn diode using a spreadsheet

    Page(s): 380 - 384
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    The numerical calculation of the potential distribution in a pn diode is presented using a spreadsheet. It can be included in an introductory course in semiconductor device physics as a demonstration of the numerical analysis of devices. It is also a demonstration of the numerical solution of Poisson's equation when the charge density is a function of the potential, and is appropriate for a section on numerical methods in an introductory course in electromagnetics View full abstract»

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Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University