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Personal Communications, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Aug 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Techniques for privacy and authentication in personal communication systems

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 6 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (29)  |  Patents (24)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (484 KB)  

    Describes progress in the development of authentication and key agreement (AKA) processes for personal communication systems (PCS). A conceptual framework is first established; this is a three-part general model that characterizes all AKA techniques. Then three proposed AKA methods are compared using this model. These methods are the so-called secret key method of GSM, the secret key method of United States Digital Cellular (IS-54, IS-95), and a public key/secret key method. Finally, a summary is presented that indicates the AKA method of preference for some proposed PCS air interfaces that are under development by standards bodies View full abstract»

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  • Security issues in a CDPD wireless network

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 16 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (15)  |  Patents (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1284 KB)  

    The authors first discuss the basic cellular digital packet data (CDPD) architecture and its authentication protocols. They then present threats to the network. Next, they investigate the basic requirements of the security architecture and goals in light of attacks. Then they present the improved authentication protocol in operation, and how it deals with faults. Next, they add authenticated key exchange for confidentiality, followed by anonymity provisions. Then, they summarize the design and present the complete protocol, and identify which protocol transmissions goes on which CDPD message. Finally, they present further issues and concerns that are beyond the scope of this protocol View full abstract»

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  • NetBill: an Internet commerce system optimized for network-delivered services

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 34 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (166)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (700 KB)  

    NetBill is a business model set of protocols, and software implementation for commerce in information goods and other network-delivered services. It has very low transaction costs for micropayments (around 1 cent for a 10 cent item), protects the privacy of the transaction, and is highly scalable. Of special interest is the authors new certified delivery mechanism which delivers information goods if and only if the consumer has paid for them. The article discusses the design of the NetBill protocol and the authors' World Wide Web (WWW) prototype implementation. As the explosive growth of the Internet continues, more people rely on networks for timely information. However, since most information on the Internet today is free, intellectual property owners have little incentive to make valuable information accessible through the network. There are many potential providers who could sell information on the Internet and many potential consumers for that information. What is missing is an electronic commerce mechanism that links the merchants and the consumers. NetBill is a business model, set of protocols, and software implementation allowing consumers to pay owners and retailers of information. While NetBill will enable a market economy in information, it is still expected that there will be an active exchange of free information View full abstract»

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  • Privacy and authentication needs of PCS

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 11 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (464 KB)  

    To provide the proper privacy and authentication for a PCS phone, some cryptographic system will be necessary. The article defines requirements that a cryptographic system used for PCS would need to meet. It does not attempt to define the cryptographic system. It does provide a template for examining cryptographic systems to choose between cryptographic alternatives. Some of the cryptographic requirements are in the air interface between the PCS phone and the radio port. Other requirements are on databases stored in the network and on information shared between systems in the process of handovers or giving service for roaming units. The paper first discusses four levels of privacy (including defining two new levels). Then, requirements are identified and discussed in the areas of privacy, theft resistance, radio system performance, system lifetime, physical requirements as implemented in portable/mobile PCS phones, and law enforcement needs View full abstract»

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  • Trials of wireless, secure electronic mail

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 28 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (660 KB)  

    The US Department of Defense (DOD) is a large user of both e-mail and security services. The introduction of commercial wireless communications and networks, and the recognition by industry of the need for security has provided the opportunity for development and trials of a wireless, secure e-mail service. The Center for Systems Engineering at the Defense Information Systems Agency has developed this capability and conducted trials with a small community of DOD users who have requirements for mobility in the workplace. These trials have introduced DOD approved security into commercial wireless data networks, and have inserted advanced technology into the hands of DOD users. The objective of these trials was to validate the system design, evaluate performance and utilization, and obtain user feedback. To realize a broad-based trial, the authors selected multiple wireless services, e-mail packages, security packages, and mobile computers, which were integrated in various combinations to meet user needs and allow a thorough trial. Both packet radio (RAM and ARDIS) and cellular digital packet data (CDPD) services were employed for the wireless connection of the mobile unit to a mail server on the user's local area network (LAN). Two commercial e-mail packages (LOTUS CC:Mail and Microsoft Mail) were integrated with the wireless service and with the security packages. Two security packages were used, one based on commercial software (SecretAgent) and the other based on a PCMCIA card (FORTEZZA) developed by the National Security Agency View full abstract»

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This Magazine ceased publication in 2001. The current retitled publication is IEEE Wireless Communications.

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