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IEEE Expert

Issue 1 • Date Spring 1989

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Explaining control strategies in problem solving

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 9 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1285 KB)  

    Explaining how knowledge-based systems reason involves presentation user modeling, dialogue structure, and the way systems understand their own problem-solving knowledge and strategies. The authors concentrate on the last of these, noting that such understanding provides any explanations's content. The authors also note that most current approaches to knowledge-based system construction require expressing knowledge and control at such low levels that it's hard to give high-level explanations. Providing an explanation example from a prototypical system (MYCIN) built using generic-task methods, they propose generic-task methodology as one way to build knowledge-based systems that contain basic explanation constructs at appropriate abstraction levels. The central concept of generic tasks is what input-output behavior (i.e. that task function), knowledge needed to perform the task, and inferences appropriate for the task are all specified together.<> View full abstract»

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  • An explanation facility for today's expert systems

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 26 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1282 KB)  

    The authors discuss explanation facility types found in most expert systems and shells used today, referring to these as practice systems, since they represent current practice in expert system work. Practice systems include nonresearch expert systems (being developed every day in industry) as well as nonresearch expert system shells. They maintain that an extensive explanation facility meeting the obligations of a practice system's role can be implemented using only practice technology. They discuss the relationship of journalism to explanation, showing that explanation facility tasks (roles) on current practice expert systems and shells resemble a newswriter's tasks, as both involve presenting users or readers with accurate, objective, noninteractive accounts of events. In news reporting, events are pieces of news. In expert-system explanation, events are actions taken by expert systems. The authors present a journalistic explanation facility, Joe, which is part of AGNESS (a generalized network-based expert system shell), under development at the University of Minnesota.<> View full abstract»

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  • Expert system benchmarks

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 37 - 44
    Cited by:  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2049 KB)  

    Benchmarks for use with expert system shells are considered. Two approaches are pursued: running a shell with a real knowledge base on different machines, and running an artificial, stylized benchmark knowledge base with different shells on the same machine. The realistic benchmark uses PC Plus, a Lisp-based shell and development environment with an inference engine that uses backward chaining (forward chaining is also possible). Stylized knowledge bases have been used with different shells to compare loading and execution time, file size, and memory requirements. Some stylized-benchmark results are given.<> View full abstract»

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  • Learning in an introductory expert systems course

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 45 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (433 KB)  

    The first author, a graduate student in computer science, had just completed an introductory knowledge-based systems course taught by the other, a professor of computer science, when they read a recent IEEE Expert article title, 'Teaching an Introductory Course in Expert Systems' (p.59-63, Winter 1986). Because their respective experiences differed substantially from those of the authors of the above article, they describe such a course here as seen primarily through the eyes of the learner. The present authors provide two distinct perspectives. The first shares the student's background, motivations, and expectations, leading to a discussion of what he learned and did not learn during the course. The second (the professor's) comments on overall project and course results, including lessons learned by the professor.<> View full abstract»

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  • Conceptual data modeling of expert systems

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 50 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1145 KB)  

    Database management system (DBMS) support for expert system knowledge bases requires data-modeling tools matching system needs. To assess its power and fit for this application, the authors applied their logical data structures data-modeling tool, LDS, to an existing rule-based expert system, Galen, and produced a clear logical schema, comprehensible by its producers and other audiences. They believe that this technique could help the design of novel systems and that its use on existing systems will facilitate DBMS support.<> View full abstract»

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  • Using expert systems to construct formal specifications

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 62 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1400 KB)  

    A project is described that is intended to formalize the software requirement specification process by defining a specification model that characterizes the generic properties of a specification. An approach is presented in which the expert system that assists in specifying requirements is integrated with a transformational system that can synthesize programs from such specifications. The specification model provides the basis for such an expert system. An example illustrates the system's functionally.<> View full abstract»

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  • Expert Focus-expert system tools: the next generation

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 75 - 76
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (315 KB)  

    The authors describe what is wrong with conventional expert system development and consider whether these gaps can be filled by second-generation expert system development tools. They examine decision-tree approaches and knowledge shaping, which utilizes decision-tree power while eliminating problems commonly associated with their use. They conclude that knowledge shaping solves the problems encountered with present tools.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1997. The current retitled publication is IEEE Intelligent Systems.

Full Aims & Scope