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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 6 • Date Jun 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Loop monotonic statements

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):497 - 505
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (820 KB)

    A statement is considered to be monotonic with respect to a loop if its execution, during the successive iterations of a given execution of the loop, assigns a monotonically increasing or decreasing sequence of values to a variable. We present static analysis techniques to identify loop monotonic statements. The knowledge of loop monotonicity characteristics of statements which compute array subsc... View full abstract»

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  • Using automatic process clustering for design recovery and distributed debugging

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):515 - 527
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1336 KB)

    Distributed applications written in Hermes typically consist of a large number of sequential processes. The use of a hierarchy of process clusters can facilitate the debugging of such applications. Ideally, such a hierarchy should be derived automatically. This paper discusses two approaches to automatic process clustering, one analyzing runtime information with a statistical approach and one util... View full abstract»

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  • Comparing detection methods for software requirements inspections: a replicated experiment

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):563 - 575
    Cited by:  Papers (158)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1228 KB)

    Software requirements specifications (SRS) are often validated manually. One such process is inspection, in which several reviewers independently analyze all or part of the specification and search for faults. These faults are then collected at a meeting of the reviewers and author(s). Usually, reviewers use Ad Hoc or Checklist methods to uncover faults. These methods force all reviewers to rely o... View full abstract»

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  • Call path refinement profiles

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):481 - 496
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1576 KB)

    In order to effectively optimize complex programs built in a layered or recursive fashion (possibly from reused general components), the programmer has a critical need for performance information connected directly to the design decisions and other optimization opportunities present in the code. Call path refinement profiles are novel tools for guiding the optimization of such programs, that: (1) ... View full abstract»

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  • Verifying definite iteration over data structures

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):506 - 514
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (784 KB)

    Methods are presented for verifying loops which iterate over elements of data structures. This verification is done in the functional style developed by Mills and others, in which code is verified against the function that the code is intended to compute. The methods allow the verifier to concentrate on the essential computation performed on each element of the structure, and separate out such con... View full abstract»

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  • Reusing software: issues and research directions

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):528 - 562
    Cited by:  Papers (192)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3788 KB)

    Software productivity has been steadily increasing over the past 30 years, but not enough to close the gap between the demands placed on the software industry and what the state of the practice can deliver; nothing short of an order of magnitude increase in productivity will extricate the software industry from its perennial crisis. Several decades of intensive research in software engineering and... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org