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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • A laboratory for teaching computer networks

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 145 - 149
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB)  

    A laboratory for teaching computer networking techniques is described. Each workstation consists of a 68008 μP operating under the OS-9 operating system. The workstations are networked via an ARCNET local area network to a common file server. The workstations were initially constructed to teach microprocessors and have been designed so that external components can be interfaced to them via a proprietary bus design using prototyping boards with plug-in wires and components. The computer networking experiments use groups of four workstations connected via their serial interfaces to a simple circuit that simulates a bus. This circuit also detects a collision on the bus caused by more than one station transmitting simultaneously and signals the four workstations via their DCD lines. Two semesters of laboratory experiments have been developed. The first builds MAC layer protocols and the second builds higher layer protocols View full abstract»

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  • Use of symbolic computation in engineering education

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 177 - 184
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (484 KB)  

    The growing use of “computer algebra” (or “symbolic computation”) makes it very attractive for employment in engineering education. Also the compromise between the analytic and numerical methods may be very useful. The objective of this paper is to draw the attention of broad engineering and educational circles to the enormous capabilities of symbolic computation and, via a few examples, show their application to the teaching of engineering View full abstract»

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  • Measurement setup for a power laboratory motor generator station

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 150 - 157
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (788 KB)  

    A measurement set up developed for autonomous motor generator stations for an undergraduate power laboratory is described in this paper. Methods used to measure and display the various electrical and mechanical quantities for easy observation by the students during the experiment are described. A microcontroller-based instrument to measure speed, frequency, load-angle and slip has been developed. The setup minimizes the tangle of wires on the work table. It also allows the students to devote their time more usefully to the experiment and observation of the characteristics itself. The setup has proven to be safe, functional durable and instructive View full abstract»

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  • A computer construction project that is both educationally sound and can be completed in one semester

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 185 - 194
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1004 KB)  

    A student-built, expandable computer project for the Electrical Engineering Microprocessor laboratory is described. The design goals include low-cost, modern instruction set, availability of inexpensive hardware and software tools, and a level of fabrication complexity within reach of the student. Hardware and software tools are introduced and various methods to obtain them are discussed. The project demonstrates a sequential method that assists the beginning student in building and “turning-on” the computer. The method is applicable to more complex digital machines. Logic diagrams for the basic system are included. Fabrication details including power bus management and by passing are discussed. Suggestions are given to extend the computer to accommodate other microprocessors, memory and I/O devices View full abstract»

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  • Experimental demonstration of the "apparent wavelength"

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 104 - 106
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB)  

    In this paper, an experimental demonstration of the "apparent wavelength" using microwaves incident on a plane conductive surface obliquely, with the electric field polarization parallel to a reflecting plane, is presented. Standing wave measurements were obtained by utilizing the interaction between the transmitting and the receiving rectangular horn antennas using the receiving horn antenna as a probe. This technique demonstrates to the students that the wavelength along the normal, the "apparent wavelength" is longer than the wavelength of the free-space incident or reflected waves and is in agreement with the theory. Finally, the proposed technique demonstrates high sensitivity and accuracy for tutorial demonstrations of standing wave pattern measurements despite the large cross-section of the receiving antenna. View full abstract»

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  • Integration of Micromouse project with undergraduate curriculum: a large-scale student participation approach

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 136 - 144
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (732 KB)  

    This paper describes a successful integration of the Micromouse project with regular undergraduate courses at California State University, Fullerton. A micromouse is a computer controlled autonomous mobile robot which can find a predetermined destination when placed in an unknown maze. The goals of this paper are to report a complete design example suitable for large-scale student participation and to discuss the benefits of the program from an educator's view point. The Intel 8088 microprocessor was chosen to make the mouse compatible with the PC systems which are universally available. Two stepping motors and eight optical sensors are used to complete the system. Software is written in C and Assembly language with over 2000 lines. Seven micromice have been built since 1990 and several of these mice have won several awards in the IEEE Region Six Southern California competition. Integration of the project with the conventional curriculum has been very successful in motivating students and keeping their interest high. Students show greater enthusiasm for classroom activities and many continue to participate in the project after the semester is over View full abstract»

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  • Piecewise-linear modeling of I-V characteristics with SPICE

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 107 - 117
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (572 KB)  

    This paper presents a technique for piecewise-linear modeling of arbitrary nonlinear I-V characteristics with SPICE. In particular, I-V characteristics (including those exhibiting negative resistance) that lend themselves to piecewise-linear approximation are easily modeled using six elemental building blocks; three for voltage-controlled I-V characteristics and three for current-controlled I-V characteristics. The elemental building blocks are implemented with resistor, diode, independent voltage source, and independent current source SPICE primitives. Two of the elemental building blocks use the ability of SPICE to accept negative values for the resistance and diode saturation current parameters. The technique is applied to model a unijunction transistor and a tunnel diode. Two negative resistance oscillator examples which use these models are included; a current-controlled negative resistance sinusoidal oscillator (unijunction transistor) and a voltage-controlled negative resistance relaxation oscillator (tunnel diode). These examples have been used to teach the fundamentals of negative resistance oscillators and nonlinear effects to sophomores and juniors View full abstract»

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  • Fuzzy Grading System

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 158 - 165
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (676 KB)  

    The difficulties associated with translating a set of scores into letter-grades are discussed. A novel method for automating this process, the Fuzzy Grading System, is developed and compared to traditional practices. Letter-grades are recognized to be fuzzy descriptors of students' performance. Thus, operations aimed at defining letter-grade boundaries are naturally carried out in the context of fuzzy set theory and logic. The Fuzzy Grading System utilizes students' and instructor's performance measures in order to modify a set of collectively approved, a priori fuzzy grades, so as to produce a “fair” mark distribution. The validity of grades is increased by compensating for factors that are not directly accessible to simpler, traditional grading methods View full abstract»

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  • A computer architecture laboratory course using programmable logic

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 118 - 125
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (644 KB)  

    This paper describes the software and hardware developed for the laboratory component of a junior/senior level computer architecture course. The principal feature of this course is that students are required to design and build their own computers using programmable logic devices (PLDs). The students use a simple register transfer language (CURTL) with a simulator and commercial PLD tools for their design activity. A graphical PC based debugging tool provides the I/O and main memory for the student built computers View full abstract»

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  • Duality transformation for two-dimensional static problems

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 195 - 197
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB)  

    A form of duality transformation, applicable to two-dimensional static problems, is formulated. It transforms electrostatic problems into magnetostatic problems by applying, instead of the common duality between the E and H vectors, one between the vectors E and B. The transformation can be easily applied to straight TEM transmission-line geometries. Its use in teaching basic electromagnetics to electrical engineering students is suggested View full abstract»

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  • A learning aid for power electronics with knowledge based components

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 171 - 176
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (668 KB)  

    In this paper we have presented a self-study expert system based power electronics instruction aid for selection and analysis of suitable power electronic converter configurations. Converter input output specifications, analysis, and converter design methodologies are interactively pursued with extensive graphical aid to guide the user (student, engineers, etc.) in the study process. Furthermore, transient, steady-state, and harmonic analysis are possible with an integrated simulator within the instruction module. A fault diagnosis expert system based module for converter-fed motor-drives, which can be chained with the expert learning aid, has also been developed. This is in the process of development to diagnose faults on all converters available in the package View full abstract»

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  • Computer modeling for enhancing instruction of electric machinery

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 166 - 170
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (424 KB)  

    This paper discusses the use of computers for modeling of electric machinery at the undergraduate level to enhance the lecture as well as the laboratory part of a course on electric machinery with introduction to power systems. It explains how computer simulation helps students not only get a better understanding of the advantages and limitations of computer simulation, but also get a better feel for the physical concepts they study in the lecture and laboratory part of the course. Sample computational projects assigned to the students are described and simulation results obtained from the computer models are presented View full abstract»

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  • An automatic characterization of a Gaussian noise source for undergraduate electronics laboratory

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 126 - 130
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (256 KB)  

    This paper describes a technique which allows the probability density and the probability distribution functions of a Gaussian noise source to be obtained in a very simple, low cost way. First a high-level noise source is described and the characterization of this source is done using only standard parts available at low cost and an easy-to-make test set. Probability density and distribution functions are measured using a synchronous modulation-demodulation technique and recorded by means of a digital storage oscilloscope connected to a compatible PC. This laboratory experiment is used by undergraduate students (of French IUT) with limited knowledge in electronics and mathematics to compare theoretical properties on noise probability with practical measurements. In this laboratory they have to analyze the technique used to measure probability density and distribution functions and to identify the Gaussian noise source in terms of mean value and variance. Finally they have to compare these quantities to those obtained by direct measurements with a “true RMS” voltmeter View full abstract»

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  • Pontrjagin duality and digital signal processing

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 131 - 135
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (364 KB)  

    All of the Fourier transforms encountered in signal processing can be regarded as instances of a single universal object-the Fourier transform associated with an abstract abelian group. We show how this way of looking at things leads to a natural and simple account of the similarities between the properties of the Fourier transforms associated with different types of signal and how it sheds a new light on the duality between sampling and aliasing View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University