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Personal Communications, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Apr 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 4 of 4
  • Wireless personal communications: what is it?

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 20 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (97)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1568 KB)  

    This article attempts to identify different issues and to put many of the activities in wireless into a framework that can provide perspective on what is driving them, and perhaps even yield some indication of where they appear to be going in the future. The technologies and systems that are currently providing, or are proposed to provide, wireless communications services can be grouped into about seven relatively distinct groups. All of the technologies and systems are evolving as technology advances and perceived needs change. Some trends are becoming evident in the evolutions. The different groups and evolutionary trends are explored along with factors that influence the characteristics of members of the groups. The grouping is generally with respect to scale of mobility and communications applications or modes. Different design compromises are evident in the different technologies and systems. The evidence suggests that the evolutionary trajectories are aimed toward at least three large groups of applications or services, namely, high-tier PCS (current cellular radio), high-speed wireless local-area networks (WLANS), and low-tier PCS (an evolution from several of the current groups). It is not clear to what extent several groups, e.g., cordless telephones, paging, and wide area data, will remain after some merging with the three large groups View full abstract»

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  • Multiuser detection for CDMA systems

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 46 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (276)  |  Patents (29)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1208 KB)  

    Spread spectrum-based code division multiple access (CDMA), has taken on a significant role in cellular and personal communications. We concentrate on direct sequence CDMA (DS/CDMA). We show that there is a natural modification of the present systems that is potentially capable of significant capacity increases. By “natural modification” we mean a modification that can be made conceptually clear, not that it is easy to implement. Indeed, the optimal multiuser detector is much too complex and most of the present research addresses the problem of simplifying multiuser detection for implementation. The objective of the article is to make the basic idea intuitive and then show how investigators are trying to reduce the idea to practice. We also indicate multiuser receiver structures with potentially acceptable levels of complexity and address potential obstacles for achieving theoretically predicted performance in practice. As a result of these investigations, an answer to the following question is expected. Is there a suboptimal multiuser detector that is cost effective to build with significant enough performance advantage over present day systems? A definitive answer is not yet available View full abstract»

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  • Testbeds for assessing the performance of a TDMA-based radio access design for UMTS

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 36 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (784 KB)  

    With the successful introduction of GSM (Global System for Mobile communications) networks in many countries, attention is now turning to the development of the next, or third, generation of mobile cellular systems. The requirements for these systems are expressed in the ITU concept of FPLMTS (Future Public Land Mobile Telecommunication Systems), and the parallel ETSI concept of UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System). Key elements in the definition of third generation systems are the radio access system and the subtending radio transmission technology. A procedure for evaluating the relative merit of radio transmission technologies is being developed as one of the instruments for identifying the radio access system(s) to be standardised. The evaluation phase will typically be performed by exercising testbeds related to the radio access proposals. A TDMA-based radio access design for UMTS has been introduced. This design bases on a new functional model for relating transport and control functions and has been developed in the framework of the European RACE Advanced TDMA Mobile Access (ATDMA) project. The performance of the ATDMA design is being assessed through a complex testbed activity aimed at: (1) proving the viability and the effective interworking of a range of radio techniques; and (2) estimating the traffic capacity of the design View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Workshop on mobile computing systems and applications

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 11 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (916 KB)  

    The goal of this two-day meeting was to foster interaction between active workers in mobile computing, with a view toward cross-fertilization of ideas. A summary is given of the discussions that took place during the workshop. The focus is on those interactions that seemed most insightful, or controversial, or evoked the most response from the audience. The discussions included novel methods of mobile computing and the development of system structures, file systems, wiring the campus, application frameworks, exploiting mobility commercially, networks and protocols, accessing the World-Wide Web, and privacy and anonymity View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 2001. The current retitled publication is IEEE Wireless Communications.

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