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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 11 • Date Nov 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • On a unified framework for the evaluation of distributed quorum attainment protocols

    Page(s): 868 - 884
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1320 KB)  

    Quorum attainment protocols are an important part of many mutual exclusion algorithms. Assessing the performance of such protocols in terms of number of messages, as is usually done, may be less significant than being able to compute the delay in attaining the quorum. Some protocols achieve higher reliability at the expense of increased message cost or delay. A unified analytical model which takes into account the network delay and its effect on the time needed to obtain a quorum is presented. A combined performability metric, which takes into account both availability and delay, is defined, and expressions to calculate its value are derived for two different reliable quorum attainment protocols: D. Agrawal and A. El Abbadi's (1991) and Majority Consensus algorithms (R.H. Thomas, 1979). Expressions for the primary site approach are also given as upper bound on performability and lower bound on delay. A parallel version of the Agrawal and El Abbadi protocol is introduced and evaluated. This new algorithm is shown to exhibit lower delay at the expense of a negligible increase in the number of messages exchanged. Numerical results derived from the model are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Prototyping in industrial software projects-bridging the gap between theory and practice

    Page(s): 825 - 832
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    Prototyping, a method and technique frequently used in many engineering disciplines, has been adopted as a technique in software engineering to improve the calculation of new projects involving risks. However, there has so far been a lack of documented experience with the use of prototyping in industrial software production. The paper tries to close this gap. First, we introduce central prototyping concepts and terminology. We also present five industrial software projects in which explicit use was made of prototyping. Based on our analysis of these projects we present the resulting conclusions: prototyping means more than rapidly developing user interfaces; prototyping is a central part of a development strategy; prototyping means end user involvement; finding the right mixture of prototypes improves the development process View full abstract»

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  • An application of artificial intelligence to object-oriented performance design for real-time systems

    Page(s): 849 - 867
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    The paper describes an application of artificial intelligence technology to the implementation of a rapid prototyping method in object-oriented performance design (OOPD) for real-time systems. OOPD consists of two prototyping phases for real-time systems. Each of these phases consists of three steps: prototype construction, prototype execution, and prototype evaluation. We present artificial intelligence based methods and tools to be applied to the individual steps. In the prototype construction step, a rapid construction mechanism using reusable software components is implemented based on planning. In the prototype execution step, a hybrid inference mechanism is used to execute the constructed prototype described in declarative knowledge representation. MENDEL, which is a Prolog based concurrent object-oriented language, can be used as a prototype construction tool and a prototype execution tool. In the prototype evaluation step, an expert system which is based on qualitative reasoning is implemented to detect and diagnose bottlenecks and generate an improvement plan for them View full abstract»

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  • Introducing object orientation into large and complex systems

    Page(s): 840 - 848
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    The paper investigates the applicability of the object-oriented technique to large and complex systems as exemplified by the operating system BS2000 which has been under constant development for a number of years. The proposed system architecture ensures the harmonious coexistence of procedural and object-oriented parts of the system. New domains, which are implemented using the object-oriented paradigm, can be smoothly embedded in the existing system. The parallel usage of different implementation languages is rendered economically viable. In our framework some representative parts of the system were redesigned and implemented in a prototype. The extensibility of the design was checked by including further parts into this scheme. The results are encouraging, so that the object-oriented technique will be used in the further development process. The proposed technique can also be applied to systems with a different structure, even a monolithic one View full abstract»

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  • Schlumberger's software improvement program

    Page(s): 833 - 839
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    A corporate-wide software process improvement effort has been ongoing at Schlumberger for several years. Through the motivation efforts of a small group, productive changes have occurred across the company. We see improvements in many development areas, including project planning and requirements management. The catalysts behind these advances include capability assessments, training, and collaboration View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org