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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date Mar 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Overview of IN and TMN harmonization

    Page(s): 62 - 66
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    Introduces the work being performed in ETSI and ITU-T on the management of IN and on IN and TMN harmonization. After a short history of, and rationale for the work in this area, a brief overview of the results achieved in ETSI's joint experts group on IN/TMN is provided. This includes the proposed mapping of the IN functional entities onto TMN function blocks and the proposal for integration of IN and TMN modeling techniques. This work has resulted in the “Baseline Document on the Integration of IN and TMN”. Both ETSI and ITU-T have accepted this document as a starting point for further addressing the special requirements of IN with respect to management (i.e., rapid deployment and provisioning of new services and corresponding management functionality). The work on further alignment of IN and TMN terminology and concepts is an ongoing activity, as both IN and TMN concepts are expected to evolve toward the definition of open and distributed platform-oriented environments. The article also addresses this work program, the intermediate results, and the expected outcome of this continued effort on the standardization of IN management View full abstract»

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  • TMN-based broadband ATM network management

    Page(s): 74 - 79
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    ATM has rapidly transitioned from a standards and prototyping concept to become the next-generation switching technology used in products available on the market. With the rapid introduction of ATM switches into networks, there is an urgent need to manage them. The article discusses the telecommunication management network (TMN) interfaces being defined for management systems to communicate with ATM network elements (NEs) and other management systems. ATM management systems will have to communicate with ATM NEs in their jurisdiction using TMN interfaces. Networks will usually contain equipment from different suppliers. Thus, it is vital that there be standard management interfaces so that these different NEs can be managed. Some standard interfaces for ATM networks are defined, while others are being defined. The status of these interfaces is reviewed in the article. Communication between different networks is also needed, both between public networks and between public and private networks. Management personnel of one network need to exchange information with other networks for certain functions (e.g., initial service provisioning), and so management systems of different networks will exchange information through a combination of mechanized and manual interfaces. The status of these interfaces is also reviewed in the article View full abstract»

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  • Trends in local wireless networks

    Page(s): 88 - 95
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    Pahlavan (1985) published an article entitled "Wireless office information networks". That article examined spread spectrum, standard radio and infrared (IR) technologies for intra-office wireless networking. In May of that year the FCC released the ISM (industrial, scientific, and medical) bands for spread spectrum local communications. Although ISM bands are not restricted to any specific application, wireless local area networks (LANs) were one of the most prominent applications that were envisioned by the rule makers in the FCC. Since 1985, many small start-up companies, as well as small groups in larger companies, have started to develop wireless LANs. The present paper provides a sequel to Pahlavan by providing an overview of the past and present of the wireless LAN industry, as well as a perspective of the future directions that encompass a vision for a ubiquitous local wireless computing environment that leads to a fusion of communications and computation View full abstract»

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  • TMN as applied to the GSM network

    Page(s): 68 - 73
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    Reviews some of the guiding principles of TMN that were applied, or consciously not applied, to the development of GSM network management. The organization of the work within the sub-technical committee and the resultant organization of the specifications are described. The article also introduces the model for the management of a GSM network, as well as some of the philosophy behind this model. Certain aspects of this model are described in greater detail to illustrate its use View full abstract»

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  • An implementation of a TMN-based SDH management system in Japan

    Page(s): 80 - 85
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    Synchronous digital hierarchy (SDH) equipment based on fiber optics, SDH interfaces, and supporting operation systems (OSs) was introduced into Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT)'s transmission-line networks beginning in 1989. One of the major problems in the first phase was less intelligent proprietary interfaces between network elements (NEs) and OSs, which caused limited connectivity among different types of NEs and OSs. A second problem was the lack of reusability of software modules for a specific type of equipment for other types of equipment. At the beginning of the second phase, the principles of the telecommunications management network (TMN) were adopted to provide good tools for defining standard interfaces and object oriented modeling. The article describes problems encountered in the first phase SDH network management system and summarizes advantages expected from making use of TMN-related standards available at the design stage of the second phase SDH network management system. It outlines the new SDH network management system, followed by results from the application of the TMN-related standards to real networks View full abstract»

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  • Managing telecommunications networks using TMN interface standards

    Page(s): 54 - 60
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    The article presents the scope of TMN standards, identifies the role and importance of interface standards, and describes the key elements of a TMN interface. TMN activities within the ITU-T, from an organizational perspective, are summarized and a more detailed description of the ITU-T specifications, organized primarily by interface element categories is given. The author examines the availability of TMN standards in support of synchronous digital hierarchy (SDH) management. (In North America, SDH is known as the synchronous optical network, or SONET.) The role of regional and national standards bodies in TMN is covered. Efforts to speed the availability of TMN implementations are briefly noted and the author describes major TMN challenges and new directions driving its evolution View full abstract»

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  • MOBITEX and mobile data systems

    Page(s): 96 - 101
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    Standards play a vital role in bringing an industry to widespread commercial use. Without standardization, interoperability of comparable systems and services is impossible, and economies of scale are never reached for manufacturing and investment. Historically, the standards are established either by a dominant player in a particular industry, e.g., IBM/Microsoft's development of DOS, or by coordination among multiple, non-dominant vendors, as was the case with GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) or UNIX. The present article delves into the existing and emerging standards in the mobile data industry, with Ericsson's MOBITEX system used as an example. It shows how wireline standards are being adapted to wireless, how this strategy compares to the development of new protocols and standards, and how the computer industry and its associated standards bodies are working to effectively hide the underlying wireless protocols View full abstract»

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  • Telecommunications management network: vision vs. reality

    Page(s): 47 - 52
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    Since the early 1980s, the standards bodies have been specifying the telecommunications management network (TMN) principles. Millions of dollars have been spent. The TMN principles aim at being applicable across telecommunications technologies. They recommend the use of independent management networks to manage telecommunications networks, elements in the telecommunications networks (managed networks), and managing systems (in managing networks), communicating via well defined, standardized interfaces. The standards bodies envisioned TMN as a possible solution to the complex problem of telecommunications networks and services operation, administration, maintenance and provisioning (OAM and P) in the open, multivendor environment. However, the vision stumbles against the reality. Various factors still hinder the implementation of TMN-based OAM and P systems. The present article provides a tutorial on TMN by contrasting the vision and the reality View full abstract»

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  • Teletraffic performance of GSM900/DCS1800 in street microcells

    Page(s): 102 - 108
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    Studies the teletraffic issues of the Global System of Mobile Communications at 900 MHz (GSM900), and its sister, the Digital Communication System at 1800 MHz (DCS1800). The teletraffic simulations have the essential elements of GSM900 and DCS1800, but they are not be exact simulations of these two systems. The approach is to site microcellular base stations, using the microcellular prediction tool MIDAS, into a fictitious city and into parts of two real cities. The radio coverage plots are then imported into a teletraffic simulator TELSIM. The simulator is loaded with the basic GSM900 and DCS1800 parameters to give an indication of the teletraffic performance of these systems in the three environments View full abstract»

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IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

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Centripetal Networks