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By Topic

Computer

Issue 2 • Date Feb 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Synthesis steps and design models for codesign

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 44 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (28)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (868 KB)  

    Codesign is a joint development of hardware and software components to obtain a complete system design. The fields of specification, design, and synthesis of mixed hardware/software systems are becoming increasingly more popular. The paper provides a taxonomy of codesign and discusses some design environments and models View full abstract»

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  • A formal approach to managing design processes

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 54 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1556 KB)  

    To capture market opportunities, competition within the microelectronics industry demands ever-faster product development, which means ever-shorter design cycles. Shorter design cycles can be achieved by carefully managing the design process during rapid prototyping. Careful management is important because the design process must be (1) adjusted to accommodate constraints such as product performance and design time, and (2) frequently updated to take advantage of new design tools and methodologies. Traditionally, designers have used whatever tools seemed convenient to them at the time, which has made it virtually impossible to determine what methodology was used to produce a given design. These problems can be avoided through design methodology management, which ensures that appropriate tools are selected and executed in the appropriate sequence. Effective design management requires an environment equipped with a formal representation of supported design processes and tools, and an execution environment that helps designers select and execute an appropriate design process. We propose a methodology management system that provides this functionality View full abstract»

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  • Determining software schedules

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 73 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (364 KB)  

    Improving software productivity, shortening schedules or time to market, and improving quality are prominent topics in software journals in both contributed articles and advertising copy. Unfortunately, most of these articles and advertisements have dealt with software schedules, productivity, or quality factors in abstract terms. Now we can measure these factors with reasonable accuracy and collect empirical data on both average and best-in-class results. We are particularly interested in the wide performance gaps between laggards, average enterprises, and industry leaders, as well as differences among the various software domains. The function-point metric lets us establish a meaningful database of software performance levels. A simple algorithm raises function points to a total to obtain a useful first-order schedule estimate View full abstract»

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  • Simulation libraries for system-level design

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 76 - 77
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB)  

    Raising the level of design abstraction to achieve a system synthesis capability requires electronic design automation (EDA) tools for design capture, analysis and verification at the new level of abstraction, as well as tools for synthesis at the next lower level of abstraction. It is essential that simulation libraries exist that support the new toolset. In system synthesis, elements of the desired product functionality will be specified as combinations of functional primitives in a high-order language or as flowgraph representations. Implementation trade offs will require the designer to simulate the performance of these functions when implemented in ASICs, FPGAs, or software. Simulation will require extensive libraries of primitives and their performance characteristics on a wide variety of hardware and software implementations. The paper considers system synthesis and some problems in system-level simulation View full abstract»

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  • Cost-effective parallel computing

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 69 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (21)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (316 KB)  

    We consider how large memories can make parallel computing cost-effective even with modest speedups. As a concrete example, we use 1994 Silicon Graphics (SGI) prices to show that actual costups can be far less than linear for systems with hundreds of Mbytes of main memory. We consider hardware costs but not software costs, since we do not know how to noncontroversially measure the latter View full abstract»

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  • A plea for lean software

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 64 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (512 KB)  

    Software's girth has surpassed its functionality, largely because hardware advances make this possible. The way to streamline software lies in disciplined methodologies and a return to the essentials. The paper discusses some causes of “fat software” and considers the Oberon system whose primary goal was to show that software can be developed with a fraction of the memory capacity and processor power usually required, without sacrificing flexibility, functionality, or user convenience View full abstract»

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  • RPM: a rapid prototyping engine for multiprocessor systems

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 26 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (55)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (888 KB)  

    RPM enables rapid prototyping of different multiprocessor architectures. It uses hardware emulation for reliable design verification and performance evaluation. The major objective of the RPM project is to develop a common, configurable hardware platform to accurately emulate different MIMD systems with up to eight execution processors. Because emulation is orders of magnitude faster than simulation, an emulator can run problems with large data sets more representative of the workloads for which the target machine is designed. Because an emulation is closer to the target implementation than an abstracted simulation, it can accomplish more reliable performance evaluation and design verification. Finally, an emulator is a real computer with its own I/O; the code running on the emulator is not instrumented. As a result, the emulator looks exactly like the target machine (to the programmer) and can run several different workloads, including code from production compilers, operating systems, databases, and software utilities View full abstract»

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  • Real-time image processing on a custom computing platform

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 16 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (38)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (776 KB)  

    The authors explore the utility of custom computing machinery for accelerating the development, testing, and prototyping of a diverse set of image processing applications. We chose an experimental custom computing platform called Splash-2 to investigate this approach to prototyping real time image processing designs. Custom computing platforms are emerging as a class of computers that can provide near application specific computational performance. We developed a real time image processing system called VTSplash, based on the Splash-2 general-purpose platform. Splash-2 is an attached processor featuring programmable processing elements (PEs) and communication paths. The Splash-2 system uses arrays of RAM based field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), crossbar networks, and distributed memory to accomplish the needed flexibility and performance tasks. Such platforms let designers customize specific operations for function and size, and data paths for individual applications View full abstract»

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  • Grape-II: a system-level prototyping environment for DSP applications

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 35 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (46)  |  Patents (26)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (924 KB)  

    We propose a rapid-prototyping setup to minimize development cost and a structured-prototyping methodology to reduce programming effort. The general-purpose hardware consists of commercial DSP processors, bond-out versions of core processors, and field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) linked to form a powerful, heterogeneous multiprocessor, such as the Paradigm RP developed within the Retides (Real-Time DSP Emulation System) Esprit project. Our Graphical Rapid Prototyping Environment (Grape-II) automates the prototyping methodology for these hardware systems by offering tools for resource estimation, partitioning, assignment, routing, scheduling, code generation, and parameter modification. Grape-II has been used successfully in three real-world DSP applications View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sumi Helal
University of Florida
sumi.helal@gmail.com