By Topic

Rehabilitation Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sep 1994

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Improving reaching in preschool children with cerebral palsy through regulated feedback

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 147 - 157
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1128 KB)  

    The education of multi-handicapped preschool children with cerebral palsy is a challenging task. Some preschool children with multiple disabilities can become productive with the aid of devices that improve mobility, communication, and activities of daily living, thus promoting educational opportunities that would otherwise be severely constrained. Reaching is critical for children with cerebral palsy who may be reliant on technology to interface with their world. This research describes the use of biomechanical principles to facilitate reaching in preschool children with cerebral palsy by modifying the trajectory of the arm. A computerized system was developed that allowed a child with cerebral palsy to practice reaching for targets placed in the workspace of the arm, and receive regulated and specific sensory feedback concerning the performance of each reach. The system calculates quantitative trajectory parameter values for each reach and converts them into a feedback reward. In this way principles of contingent learning are utilized to enable preschool children with cerebral palsy to modify their reaches to approximate normative values. A validation study of the system with normal children and children with cerebral palsy showed that the system discriminated reaching in the two groups, and improved certain reach parameters in the preschool children with cerebral palsy who underwent a trajectory training as an experimental intervention View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Modeling the speed of text entry with a word prediction interface

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 177 - 187
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1116 KB)  

    This study analyzes user performance of text entry tasks with word prediction by applying modeling techniques developed in the field of human-computer interaction. Fourteen subjects transcribed text with and without a word prediction feature for seven test sessions. Eight subjects were able-bodied and used mouthstick typing, while six subjects bad high-level spinal cord injuries and used their usual method of keyboard access. Use of word prediction decreased text generation rate for the spinal cord injured subjects and only modestly enhanced it for the able-bodied subjects. This suggests that the cognitive cost of using word prediction had a major impact on the performance of these subjects. Performance was analyzed in more detail by deriving subjects' times for keypress and list search actions during word prediction use. All subjects had slower keypress times during word prediction use as compared to letters-only typing, and spinal cord injured subjects had much slower list search times than able-bodied subjects. These parameter values were used in a two-parameter model to simulate subjects' word entry times during word prediction use, with an average model error of 16%. These simulation results are an encouraging first step toward demonstrating the ability of analytical models to represent user performance with word prediction View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Application of quality function deployment in rehabilitation engineering

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 158 - 164
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (724 KB)  

    Rehabilitation engineers are highly dependent upon input from consumers, service clinicians and other technical professionals to guide them in the product development process. Designers of assistive devices are consistently striving to improve their products to remain competitive. New designs or modifications to current products that are cost effective yet truly reflective of the priorities of consumers and clinicians are often difficult to identify. A design strategy called Quality Function Deployment provides a method of organizing and structuring these priorities to focus the energies of the design team. A case study is presented that describes the application of Quality Function Deployment to the modification of the design of myoelectric prosthetic hands View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A functional task analysis and motion simulation for the development of a powered upper-limb orthosis

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 119 - 129
    Cited by:  Papers (23)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (980 KB)  

    Describes research work directed towards the development and application of a design methodology to determine the optimal configuration of a powered upper-limb orthosis. The design objective was to minimize the orthosis complexity, defined as the number of degrees of freedom, while maintaining the ability to perform specific tasks. This objective was achieved in three stages. First, potential users of a powered orthosis were interviewed to determine their priority tasks. Secondly, the natural arm motions of able-bodied individuals performing the priority tasks were profiled using a video tracking system. Finally, a kinematic simulation algorithm was developed and employed in order to evaluate whether a proposed orthosis configuration could perform the priority tasks. The research results indicate that task functionality is overly compromised for orthosis configurations with less than five degrees of freedom, plus prehension. Acceptable task performance, based on the specific priority tasks considered, was achieved in the simulations of two different orthosis configurations with five degrees of freedom. In the first design option, elevation (rotation about a horizontal axis through the shoulder) and radial/ulnar deviation are fixed, while in the second option wrist flexion and radial/ulnar deviation are fixed. A prototype orthosis is currently being developed using the first design option View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The effect of task asymmetry, age and gender on dynamic trunk motion characteristics during repetitive trunk flexion and extension in a large normal population

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 137 - 146
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1028 KB)  

    Management of low back pain (LBP) has remained a major challenge to both clinical and engineering communities. With present technology, the lack of anatomical finding in a majority of LBD patients has increased the interest in objective quantification of trunk performance from all areas of rehabilitation: diagnosis, treatment, disability evaluation, return to work determination, ergonomic intervention and prevention. Different dimensions of trunk performance have been quantified with a diverse set of technologies. It is essential that a normative database be established to facilitate the use of these quantitative measures in both the ergonomics and rehabilitation fields. The present study provides a new technique to measure dynamic trunk performance characteristics during repetitive flexion and extension of the trunk at the preferred speed in a large, healthy population (N=351). The effects of task asymmetry, gender and age on these dynamic parameters were investigated. Significant results were found due to task asymmetry, age and gender on dynamic parameters of trunk performance. The higher derivative motion parameters such as velocity and acceleration were more sensitive to the main effects than the range of motion. In general, increased asymmetry and age caused diminished dynamic trunk capability. These results were compared to an industrial surveillance study that identified the injurious levels of high trunk velocity and acceleration. Clinically, these results have provided the basis for quantifying the extent of trunk dysfunction of patients with different low back disorder diagnoses View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A predictive selection technique for single-digit typing with a visual keyboard

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 130 - 136
    Cited by:  Patents (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (644 KB)  

    A modification to the “dwell” selection technique for visual keyboards is presented. The change incorporates a prediction algorithm which eliminates the dwell-times from appropriate keys. Simulation suggests that this technique can eliminate between 20% and 65% of dwell-times with an increase in error rate of less than 3% View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Improved access to computers for the visually handicapped: new prospects and principles

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 111 - 118
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (24)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (756 KB)  

    Discusses the future of computer access products for people with a visual handicap. The existing special computer access solutions are briefly reviewed. Their limitations are examined in terms of a human-computer interaction, and the technical origins of these limitations are analyzed. New technologies are explored and their potential for significantly improving the human-computer interface are reviewed. Finally, principles for the future development of nonvisual human-computer interfaces are proposed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Instrumented assessment of FNS hand control during specific manipulation tasks

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 165 - 176
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1104 KB)  

    Describes tests that quantitatively assess the operation of FNS hand grasp neuroprostheses and the ability of spinal cord injury patients to use these systems to perform specific tasks simulating activities of daily living. An integrated measurement system monitors internal variables within the neuroprosthesis, the kinematics of the patient's arm and the grasped object, and interactions of the subject's hand with the object and the environment. Two tasks, drinking and eating, are broken down into sequential elemental states based on the measurements. The durations of each state, determined from the data, show that 1) patients using the neuroprosthesis take more time than normals to perform nearly all states of the two tasks, 2) the command control scheme has a large effect on the time a patient takes to pick up an object, 3) patients compensate for paralyzed forearm pronators by increasing shoulder abduction, and 4) patients use forces in the same range as normals during grasp View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased publication in 2000. The current retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabiliation Engineering.

Full Aims & Scope