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Annals of the History of Computing, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Winter 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • The origins of computer programming

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 6 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1410 KB)  

    This article describes some of the early developments that can now be viewed as steps toward the development of program control and the modern concept of a stored program. In particular, it discusses early automatic devices, Babbage's contributions set against a background of the technology of his day, the contributions of some of his direct successors, and the genesis of the stored-program idea.<> View full abstract»

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  • The early history of REXX

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 15 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    REXX is a procedural language with many novel features. Its goal was to make programming easier in the belief that getting the design right for people to use is more important than providing for easy implementation. REXX development depended on the use of electronic mail. As a result, and perhaps uniquely for a programming language, there is an essentially complete historical record of the design process and discussions. This article describes the early history of REXX, illustrated by quotations from the electronic mail record and from other contemporary documents.<> View full abstract»

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  • Compiling SIMULA: a historical study of technological genesis

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 25 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    This article traces the history of the programming language SIMULA from the 1950s into the 1970s, focusing in particular on the formative years between 1962 and 1967. It offers no technical appraisal of the language per se. Rather, it is a sociotechnical analysis aimed at exploring the broader history of the SIMULA project. The article asserts that technological change should be studied in a contextual perspective. Thus the politics surrounding the project and the prehistory of SIMULA are given ample attention.<> View full abstract»

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  • A history of data-flow languages

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 38 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (42)
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    Data-flow refers both to a language-level paradigm of computation and to a family of processor architectures based on this paradigm. This article elaborates data-flow language issues and the evolution of data-flow languages. In considering limits to the expressive power of these languages, underlying architectural issues are discussed. Although the article attempts to present a complete history of data-flow languages, it concentrates on those languages that specifically belong to this class and have been implemented for a data-flow machine. In many cases, the distinctions between issues of language semantics and machine architecture are unclear. Usually we have found that this reflects the evolution of data-flow, and the close association between language and architecture development. In some sections of the article, it may appear that there is an imbalance in the amount of detail presented when compared with other sections. This imbalance is proportional to the publications and the amount of information readily available for the topics.<> View full abstract»

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  • Arming American scientists: NSF and the provision of scientific computing facilities for universities, 1950-1973

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 60 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1670 KB)  

    This article discusses the role of the US National Science Foundation in the provision of scientific computing facilities for colleges and universities in the period 1950 to 1973. In this period, the NSF played a major role in establishing computing facilities on American campuses for the purposes of scientific research and science education. By the end of this period, most of these programs at NSF had been disbanded, and the foundation was concentrating its support for computing not on the service of other scientific disciplines, but instead on the establishment of a theoretically oriented discipline of computer science. The primary focus here is on NSF institutional history with only a few examples of the impact of NSF programs. But if is an important part of a larger story of the role of the federal government in establishing American hegemony in computing in this era.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

From the analytical engine to the supercomputer, from Pascal to von Neumann, from punched cards to CD-ROMs -- theIEEE Annals of the History of Computing covers the breadth of computer history.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Lars Heide
Copenhagen Business School
Centre for Business History