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Computing & Control Engineering Journal

Issue 5 • Date Oct. 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • M3S-a standard communication architecture for rehabilitation applications

    Page(s): 213 - 218
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (646 KB)  

    The M3S (Multiple-Master, Multiple-Slave) bus is a proposed standard digital communication bus designed to improve access to technical aids by disabled people. It provides a standard interface between input devices and end-effectors, allowing devices from different manufacturers to be linked in the same system. The bus is primarily intended for use on wheelchairs. It is based on an industry-standard protocol-the controller area network (CAN)-and includes additional signal lines to increase safety and integrity.<> View full abstract»

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  • Wireless LANs: developments in technology and standards

    Page(s): 219 - 224
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (544 KB)  

    The article examines the major developments in wireless LAN standards and technology. It describes the fundamentals of radio and infra-red, and reviews the main considerations facing the systems designer. The article also charts the objectives, plans and progress of industry standards, and reviews the status of European spectrum assignment and licensing relating to spread spectrum LANs, HIPERLAN and DECT.<> View full abstract»

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  • The Horizon Project

    Page(s): 225 - 228
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (471 KB)  

    Multimedia is sometimes described as a solution looking for a problem. Hampshire Schools, with the help of Acorn Computers, have recently been examining the possibility that school classrooms may be one of multimedia's natural homes. The Horizon Project looks at the potential of multimedia authoring to support and enhance pupils' learning.<> View full abstract»

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  • Technological hubris

    Page(s): 229 - 234
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (663 KB)  

    A surgeon, astronomer and programmer sat down for tea and a fierce argument arose over whose was the oldest profession. The programmer claimed that Ada Lovelace was the first programmer. Then the astronomer traced astronomical observation right back to the ancient Babylonians. The surgeon claimed his was clearly the oldest profession since removing Adam's rib to make Eve was surgery. Challenged like this, the astronomer claimed that her profession was oldest, since before that, God had made the universe out of chaos. The programmer said: 'and who do you think created the chaos?'. The purpose of the article is to justify a critical view of current practice. It is argued that there is something deeply wrong with our approach to complex systems. Moreover, what is wrong is not amenable to a technological fix. Waiting for virtual reality, say, to work is a diversion and just more of the same.<> View full abstract»

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  • The Cyprus Institute of Technology-a pioneer organisation for technological upgrading and business restructuring

    Page(s): 237 - 238
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB)  

    The Cyprus Institute of Technology is a recently established foundation whose mission is to promote technological upgrading and business restructuring as a means of strengthening the competitiveness of Cyprus industry. It has, so far been active in promoting reliable professional consultancy services to industrialists facing problems of reduced competitiveness and loss of traditional markets. In the process, efforts have been made to introduce listing criteria for consultants and appropriate consultants' training courses.<> View full abstract»

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  • Tools and techniques for the testing of safety-critical software

    Page(s): 239 - 244
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (587 KB)  

    As a result of the DTI/SERC research initiative on safety-critical systems a major study has been conducted into the benefits and shortcomings of the available tools and techniques for computer-aided testing of high-integrity software. The work described forms part of the CONTESSE project, which is concerned with various aspects of software testing. Working from experience and knowledge accumulated by a number of leading UK companies it has been possible to assemble data that should prove valuable to all organisations engaged in the development or licensing of safety-critical computer-based systems. Both strengths and weaknesses of current methods are discussed. The article is an integral part of the DTI/SERC initiative to disseminate such knowledge to a wider audience.<> View full abstract»

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  • Problems and prospects for higher education in India

    Page(s): 245 - 247
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (341 KB)  

    The Indian higher education system has undergone tremendous qualitative and quantitative changes during the past few decades. This article looks at its historical development, depth, spatial spread, diversity and dimensions, and then considers its future growth.<> View full abstract»

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  • Rule induction-machine learning techniques

    Page(s): 249 - 255
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (682 KB)  

    With artificial neural networks (ANN) now approaching the exploitable stage and their use being promoted under the DTI's "Neural Computing: Learning Solutions Campaign", it is an appropriate time to consider an alternative set of machine learning techniques in which production rules are generated from sets of data. The techniques used in rule induction offer a powerful alternative approach to ANN but, since both deal in essence with the production of a classifier from a set of example data, it is not surprising that both are being successfully applied to the same types of problems. In turn, the drawbacks of each of the methods are similar, although practitioners of each approach argue that their method has advantages over the other. Much is currently being heard about the benefits of ANN, and this article is intended to redress the balance in a small way by describing rule induction techniques and how they can be applied. Inevitably some advantages over ANN are identified, but it is expected that the ANN community will have adequate answers to any criticism.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Published from 2003-2007, Computing and Control Engineering was concerned with computing, communications, control and instrumentation.

Full Aims & Scope