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Software, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov. 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Software beyond 2001: a global vision

    Page(s): 8 - 12
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    The worldwide software industry is poised for change well into the next century. How well each developer; researcher, or country fares may depend on how clear its visions of the future are. In this collection of essays, some original thinkers peer into the next century.<> View full abstract»

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  • How to solve the management crisis?

    Page(s): 14 - 15
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    Discusses how the software crisis can be addressed with a new reuse-intensive process. The disciplined use of fundamental techniques is a steadier, surer way to improvement. The authors discuss how we need a revolution in software management, but that it must be done with vision.<> View full abstract»

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  • Globalization of software supply and demand

    Page(s): 17 - 24
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    PCs and industrial microcomputers are changing the software industry dramatically. Many developing countries are now entering the commercial software domain, and this trend should accelerate in the twenty-first century. Software use is also expanding rapidly on a global basis. The author considers how these trends are sure to have a major effect on the US software industry.<> View full abstract»

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  • Management-aided software engineering

    Page(s): 25 - 32
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    Two veteran software managers examine some of today's management best practices for signs of what might become generally accepted practice in the near future. They present these practices from a small sample of healthy organizations. In addition, they envision how software management might mature over the next few decades to produce a new generation of best practices.<> View full abstract»

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  • Coming of age in an object-oriented world

    Page(s): 33 - 41
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    The author predicts that increasing connectivity and consumer demands will power an unprecedented growth in software's volume and complexity, then explains why the flexibility and robustness of an object-oriented approach can best meet these future challenges.<> View full abstract»

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  • The software-research crisis

    Page(s): 42 - 47
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    With the advantage of more than 25 years' hindsight, this twenty-first century author looks askance at the "crisis" in software practice and expresses deep concern for a crisis in software research.<> View full abstract»

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  • Soft computing and fuzzy logic

    Page(s): 48 - 56
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    Discusses soft computing, a collection of methodologies that aim to exploit the tolerance for imprecision and uncertainty to achieve tractability, robustness, and low solution cost. Its principal constituents are fuzzy logic, neurocomputing, and probabilistic reasoning. Soft computing is likely to play an increasingly important role in many application areas, including software engineering. The role model for soft computing is the human mind.<> View full abstract»

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  • Problems, methods and specialization

    Page(s): 57 - 62
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    The large aspiration to place the whole of software development alongside the established branches as one more branch of engineering is misconceived. The author discusses how our aspiration should be to develop specialized branches of software engineering, each meriting its own place alongside the specialized established branches.<> View full abstract»

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  • Software engineering in Asia

    Page(s): 63 - 68
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    Asia boasts a growing software industry spread across several countries. However, software technology in Asia still lags behind the US. To become competitive in the global marketplace, many Asian countries have started to improve their university systems and software-development industries. If successful, by 2001 their efforts will create an Asian software industry quite different from today's. The authors survey these efforts and sketch briefly the history of software development in each country. They survey recent trends in Asian software engineering from the industrial, educational, and organizational viewpoints, and offer an optimistic assessment of efforts toward modernization and regional cooperation.<> View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic queries for visual information seeking

    Page(s): 70 - 77
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    Considers how dynamic queries allow users to "fly through" databases by adjusting widgets and viewing the animated results. In studies, users reacted to this approach with an enthusiasm more commonly associated with video games. Adoption requires research into retrieval and display algorithms and user-interface design. The author discusses how experts may benefit from visual interfaces because they will be able to formulate more complex queries and interpret intricate results.<> View full abstract»

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  • Knowledge acquisition and interface design

    Page(s): 90 - 92
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    Describes tools, techniques, and concepts to optimize user interfaces. The best way to ensure that a software system is friendly and works is to base it on the intended users' mental models (how they view the world), knowledge structures (what they know and how they have organized it), and work processes. The author uses a team of engineers to systematically acquire and analyze user and domain knowledge and to translate that knowledge into user-interface design decisions. This front-end analysis method, combined with knowledge-acquisition techniques, lets one build user-centered systems.<> View full abstract»

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  • Fifteen principles of software engineering

    Page(s): 94 - 96
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    Because the product of software engineering is not physical, physical laws do not form a suitable foundation. Instead, software engineering has had to evolve its principles based solely on observations of thousands of projects. The following are probably the 15 most important principles: (1) make quality number one priority; (2) high-quality software is possible; (3) give products to customers early; (4) determine the problem before writing requirements; (5) evaluate design alternatives; (6) use an appropriate process model; (7) use different languages for different phases; (8) minimize intellectual distance; (9) put technique before tools; (10) get it right before you make it faster; (11) inspect code; (12) good management is more important than good technology; (13) people are the key to success; (14) follow hype with care; and (15) take responsibility. An additional 15 software engineering principles are also listed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Software law: retrospect and prospect

    Page(s): 97 - 98
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    Discusses the legal and policy aspects of information technology use and development, reviewing what issues have gained attention since 1991, and what issues are likely to be important in the near future.<> View full abstract»

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  • Process-oriented software education

    Page(s): 99 - 101
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    In the last few years, development organizations have come to recognize that software development has moved beyond the capabilities of individual programmers and is now an engineering activity performed by teams, and the quality of a software product is highly dependent on the quality of the process used to develop it. The process movement has had a visible effect on the software industry, but how should it influence educators? In this article, the author describes his institution's response. He presents some new views of mature ideas on software quality and productivity.<> View full abstract»

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  • Adventures in embedded development

    Page(s): 116 - 118
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    Embedded applications are not easy or unsophisticated: unique problems create situations that cannot always be predicted, and native tools and environments do not transfer well to embedded designs. Embedded-systems developers must remember that the task is the embedded system. Building things like tools, operating systems and protocol stacks almost always costs more than buying commercial products and usually creates unplanned critical paths and development delays. Don't invent what you can buy. An off-the-shelf real-time operating system (RTOS) is one of the best buys you can make. Diligence in project planning and development always pays dividends, especially in embedded systems. Understand how difficult a project is relative to timing demands, and plan accordingly.<> View full abstract»

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Editor-in-Chief
Forrest Shull
Fraunhofer Center for Experimental Software Engineering