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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 10 • Date Oct 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • A Markov chain model for statistical software testing

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):812 - 824
    Cited by:  Papers (109)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (976 KB)

    Statistical testing of software establishes a basis for statistical inference about a software system's expected field quality. This paper describes a method for statistical testing based on a Markov chain model of software usage. The significance of the Markov chain is twofold. First, it allows test input sequences to be generated from multiple probability distributions, making it more general th... View full abstract»

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  • Prototyping a process monitoring experiment

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):774 - 784
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (928 KB)

    Features are often the basic unit of development for a very large software system and represent long-term efforts, spanning up to several years from inception to actual use. Developing an experiment to monitor (by means of sampling) such lengthy processes requires a great deal of care in order to minimize casts and to maximize benefits. Just as prototyping is often a necessary auxiliary step in a ... View full abstract»

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  • SWSL: a synthetic workload specification language for real-time systems

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):798 - 811
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1256 KB)

    We discuss the issues that must be addressed in the specification and generation of synthetic workloads for distributed real-time systems. We describe a synthetic workload specification language (SWSL) that defines a workload in a form that can be compiled by a synthetic workload generator (SWG) to produce an executable synthetic workload. The synthetic workload is then downloaded to the target ma... View full abstract»

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  • A framework for expressing the relationships between multiple views in requirements specification

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):760 - 773
    Cited by:  Papers (166)  |  Patents (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1660 KB)

    Composite systems are generally comprised of heterogeneous components whose specifications are developed by many development participants. The requirements of such systems are invariably elicited from multiple perspectives that overlap, complement, and contradict each other. Furthermore, these requirements are generally developed and specified using multiple methods and notations, respectively. It... View full abstract»

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  • How accurate is scientific software?

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):785 - 797
    Cited by:  Papers (43)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1160 KB)

    This paper describes some results of what, to the authors' knowledge, is the largest N-version programming experiment ever performed. The object of this ongoing four-year study is to attempt to determine just how consistent the results of scientific computation really are, and, from this, to estimate accuracy. The experiment is being carried out in a branch of the earth sciences known as seismic d... View full abstract»

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  • Simulating the behavior of software modules by trace rewriting

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):750 - 759
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (844 KB)

    The trace assertion method is a module interface specification method based on the finite state machine model. To support this method, we plan to develop a specification simulation tool, a trace simulator, that symbolically interprets trace assertions of trace specifications and simulates the externally observable behavior of the modules specified. We first present the trace assertion method. Then... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org