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Computer

Issue 10 • Date Oct. 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Displaying 3D images: algorithms for single-image random-dot stereograms

    Page(s): 38 - 48
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1283 KB)  

    A new, simple, and symmetric algorithm can be implemented that results in higher levels of detail in solid objects than previously possible with autostereograms. In a stereoscope, an optical instrument similar to binoculars, each eye views a different picture and thereby receives the specific image that would have arisen naturally. An early suggestion for a color stereo computer display involved a rotating filter wheel held in front of the eyes. In contrast, this article describes a method for viewing on paper or on an ordinary computer screen without special equipment, although it is limited to the display of 3D monochromatic objects. (The image can be colored, say, for artistic reasons, but the method we describe does not allow colors to be allocated in a way that corresponds to an arbitrary coloring of the solid object depicted.) The image can easily be constructed by computer from any 3D scene or solid object description.<> View full abstract»

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  • Cache profiling and the SPEC benchmarks: a case study

    Page(s): 15 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1204 KB)  

    A vital tool-box component, the CProf cache profiling system lets programmers identify hot spots by providing cache performance information at the source-line and data-structure level. Our purpose is to introduce a broad audience to cache performance profiling and tuning techniques. Although used sporadically in the supercomputer and multiprocessor communities, these techniques also have broad applicability to programs running on fast uniprocessor workstations. We show that cache profiling, using our CProf cache profiling system, improves program performance by focusing a programmer's attention on problematic code sections and providing insight into appropriate program transformations.<> View full abstract»

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  • 3D optical interconnects for high-speed interchip and interboard communications

    Page(s): 27 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1329 KB)  

    Metal-based communications between subsystems and chips has become the limiting factor in high-speed computing. Maturing optics-based technologies offer advantages that may unplug this bottleneck. Optical interconnects offer high-speed computers key advantages over metal interconnects. These include (1) high spatial and temporal bandwidths, (2) high-speed transmission, (3) low crosstalk independent of data rates, and (4) high interconnect densities. Although faster device switching speeds will eventually be necessary for future massively parallel computing systems, the deciding factor in determining system performance and cost will be subsystem communications rather than device speed. Free-space optical interconnects, by virtue of their inherent parallelism, high data bandwidth, small size and power requirement, and relative freedom from mutual interference of signals, already show great promise in replacing metal interconnects to solve communication problems.<> View full abstract»

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  • Mosaic and the World Wide Web

    Page(s): 49 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2181 KB)  

    The World-Wide Web, an information service on the Internet, uses hypertext links to other textual documents or files. Users can click on a highlighted word or words in the text to provide additional information about the selected word(s). Users can also access graphic pictures, images, audio clips, or even full-motion video through hypermedia, an extension of hypertext. One of the most popular graphics-oriented browsers is Mosaic, which was developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) as a way to graphically-navigate the WWW. Mosaic browsers are currently available for Unix workstations running X Windows, PCs running Microsoft Windows, and Macintosh computers. Mosaic can access data in WWW servers, Wide Area Information Servers (WAIS), Gopher servers, Archie servers, and several others. The World-Wide Web is still evolving at a rapid pace. Distributed hypermedia systems on the Internet will continue to be an active area of development in the future. The flexibility of the WWW design, its use of hyperlinks, and the integration of existing WAIS and Gopher information resources, make the WWW ideal for future research and study. Highly interactive multimedia applications will require more sophisticated tools than currently exist. The most significant issue that needs to be resolved is the mismatch between WWW system capabilities and user requirements in the areas of presentation and quality of service.<> View full abstract»

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  • Porting Ada: a report from the field

    Page(s): 58 - 64
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    With the constant barrage of new systems, porting software applications is inevitable. This article takes a look at the problems involved in porting an Ada/C application. The porting effort begins when the software architecture is defined and the code implemented. The task is completed with the successful execution of the software on all target platforms. The AFATDS porting effort to the HP RISC platform was completed successfully. The effort to port AFATDS to an InteVSCO Unix platform is still incomplete and is awaiting an Ada compiler upgrade that can pass the AFATDS messaging schema's large arrays to generic procedures. With the numerous operating systems available, the constant barrage of new operating system releases, and the continual hardware advancements, the need to port software applications is evident. The success of any porting effort depends on the maturation and reliability of the tools being used. If the Department of Defense's dual-use strategy is to succeed, DoD must also foster the development of reliable and affordable Ada tools.<> View full abstract»

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  • High-pressure steam engines and computer software

    Page(s): 65 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1365 KB)  

    The introduction of computers into the control of potentially dangerous devices has led to a growing awareness of the possible contribution of software to serious accidents. The number of computer-related accidents so far has been small due to the restraint shown in introducing computers into safety-critical control loops. However, as the economic and technological benefits of using computers become more widely accepted, their use is increasing dramatically. We need to ensure that computers are introduced into safety-critical systems in the most responsible way possible and at a speed that does not expose people to undue risk. Risk induced by technological innovation existed long before computers; this is not the first time that humans have come up with an extremely useful new technology that is potentially dangerous. Studying parallels in the early development of high-pressure steam engines and of software engineering can help.<> View full abstract»

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  • Intellectual property protection: everything you've always wanted to know

    Page(s): 74 - 75
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (445 KB)  

    This article examines the legal issues affecting people who spend a lot of time in the computer hardware/software arena. It discusses some of the basic patent-application disclosure requirements which inventors must satisfy. These requirements enumerate what inventors must include in the patent application to meet the US Patent Office's definition of a "fully described" invention. To more clearly demonstrate some of the prominent issues I discuss examples from a patent attorney with both a professional and personal interest in the acquisition of intellectual property rights for computer-related inventions.<> View full abstract»

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  • Customizing information. 2. How successful are we so far?

    Page(s): 76 - 78
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (346 KB)  

    For pt.1 see ibid., p.96-8, September 1994. Although advanced information customization-transforming information so that it is appropriate to a particular consumer at a particular time-shares some characteristics of other information science disciplines, it is set apart by a need for such capabilities as transformation of individual documents, interactivity, and nonprescriptive structuring. Information retrieval and filtering, hypertext and hypermedia, information extraction and knowledge discovery in databases, information analysis, and data interchange all embody some of the characteristics that will be needed to make the totality of human knowledge more accessible and useful. Additional tools and methods are being developed to help implement advanced information customization. Interactive, nonlinear, nonprescriptive document customization for browsing is but one component among many approaches that will be needed to effectively use information in tomorrow's world. Information is becoming increasingly available online, and digital libraries will eventually become so thoroughly interconnected as to make all such libraries elements in a single, distributed, worldwide digital library. Together with information-customizing interfaces, this will fulfil H.G. Wells' promise of making the whole human memory accessible to everyone.<> View full abstract»

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Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

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Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
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