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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Aug 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Control teaching via low cost setups

    Page(s): 269 - 270
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (136 KB)  

    In the framework of engineering laboratory education, this correspondence introduces low-cost experiments that are very convenient to illustrate the application of control techniques on true hardware setups. The paper provides the basic schemes of two automatic bridges that can be built from usual laboratory components View full abstract»

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  • Computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Page(s): 322 - 327
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (576 KB)  

    At the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the computer engineering curriculum is offered by the large, research-oriented Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The curriculum features a strong foundation in electrical engineering, an appropriate balance of computer hardware and software topics, a sequence of increasingly sophisticated design experiences, and a wide variety of electives. During the 20 years of its existence, the curriculum has undergone numerous minor changes, and further continual improvements are expected View full abstract»

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  • Four-state model for the Schottky transistor

    Page(s): 303 - 305
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB)  

    Static operation of the Schottky-clamped transistor is described in terms of four simple models, cutoff, active, clamp, and reverse clamp; where the clamp model closely resembles the saturation model for an unclamped transistor. With these models one can describe details of circuits containing Schottky transistors using simple equivalent circuits View full abstract»

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  • A digital signal processing laboratory for undergraduates

    Page(s): 243 - 246
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB)  

    An undergraduate level laboratory on digital signal processing (DSP) is described. The equipment used and samples of student experiments are described in detail. The lab is based on the TMS320 digital signal processor and is equipped with spectral analysis and audio signal processing capabilities. The primary purpose of the lab is to supplement a course on digital filter design and implementation. However, it can also be used for senior design projects involving DSP applications View full abstract»

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  • A simplified method for the bilinear s-z transformation

    Page(s): 289 - 292
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB)  

    A new technique for performing the bilinear transformation of polynomials is presented. The technique is both simple to understand as well as efficient in its computer implementation. The key to the method is the may in which the successive derivatives of a particular polynomial are computed. A simple recursion formula is used which can be done either by hand, if desired, or by computer. The order of complexity of the algorithm is found to be O(n2), while storage requirements are O(n), where n is the degree of the polynomial. The new method will handle completely general bilinear transformations. A computer implementation is presented which was found to be satisfactory for both precision and speed View full abstract»

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  • A useful and challenging take-home examination: characterization of an imaginary semiconductor sample

    Page(s): 319 - 321
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    A take-home examination required students in a semiconductor device physics course to clarify their understanding of the properties of semiconductors. Students were given numerical values of measurements “made” on an imaginary semiconductor and then asked to determine the semiconductor's physical characteristics View full abstract»

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  • Laboratory-based coursework in parallel processing using the transputer

    Page(s): 299 - 302
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    The design of a low cost, target transputer system is described, along with code development facilities, that allows the concepts of parallel processing to be taught in a practical manner. Outlines of eight graded exercises are also included as an indication of how the system might be used in an undergraduate laboratory View full abstract»

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  • The look-up table for deriving the Fourier transforms of cosine-pulses

    Page(s): 306 - 311
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (396 KB)  

    This paper presents a new and easy method of obtaining the Fourier transforms of the nth order cosine-pulses which have uniform amplitudes. This new method focuses on deriving formulas which are recursively related to their orders, and thus making it also applicable to numerical solutions. Concerning the procedures needed to obtain the analytical solutions, this new method proves to be simpler than conventional methods, because the results consist of a sum of two functions which can be easily calculated recursively. It must be noted that the formula can be represented as a complete recursion by separating the coefficients in the manner originated by the authors. The resulting equation is the sum of the original “sinc” functions shifted by some symmetrical factors and then multiplied by several constants. The constants are easily determined by the binomial coefficients and the shifting factors from the corresponding exponential differences in the expansion of (a+b) n. Furthermore, a lookup table is obtained, making it possible to get all the coefficients and factors needed for the Fourier transform of the cosine-pulses of any order View full abstract»

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  • Designing a bi-directional logic translator

    Page(s): 293 - 298
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (444 KB)  

    The design of a bi-directional logic translator requires a clear understanding of the parameters of logic design: Boolean algebra, voltage transfer, fanout, time delay, and power dissipation. Also, it requires the use of tri-state logic and latches in control lines, and it introduces several of the many logic families used in an actual digital system. This design project is suitable for a course in digital electronics, and it can lead to further developments in a senior thesis or in a graduate-level project. The simplest translator design (CMOS to TTL) can be a homework project. The most complex (a silicon to gallium-arsenide translator) is a research grade project for a graduate student. Exact specifications are determined by the instructor View full abstract»

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  • Some comments on steady-state and asymptotic responses

    Page(s): 264 - 268
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (412 KB)  

    This paper explores the concepts of steady-state, asymptotic and transient response for linear time-invariant systems. While these concepts appear in many texts in circuits and systems, very often precise definitions are not given. In the paper the linear system is assumed to be a continuous-time single-input-single-output (SISO) system, characterized by its transfer function W(s) or impulse response w(t). The forced response of the system is decomposed into three components, the “input” component, the “system” component, and the “interaction” component. For rational transfer functions and transformed inputs, the above concepts are developed in terms of these three components. The concepts are extended to the case where either the system transfer function W(s) or the transformed input U(s) may be nonrational View full abstract»

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  • A technique for the design of microprocessor memory systems

    Page(s): 237 - 242
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB)  

    A systematic technique for the design of the chip select logic for microprocessor memory systems is given. In this technique, a memory table must be completed that shows the logic levels on each address line required to place every device (RAM, ROM, and I/O ports) at their desired locations in memory space. The memory table helps a designer visualize the system requirements and properly design the address decoding logic. The possibilities of bus contention can easily he recognized and avoided either by hardware or use of proper device locations in software. The technique is also a useful analysis tool View full abstract»

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  • An industry-sponsored professional development course: design for automotive ASICs

    Page(s): 312 - 318
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (844 KB)  

    Delco Electronics Corporation developed and offered a two week professional development course on integrated circuit (IC) design entitled “Design for Automotive ASICs” during the summer of 1991. It was cosponsored with the American Society for Engineering Education, with additional training and support provided by Mentor Graphics, Cascade Design Automation and Hewlett Packard Corporations. During the first week, engineers and managers from Delco Electronics described products and technologies through several presentations and tours. Also, the participants learned about IC design tools and methodology through lectures and labs using engineering workstations. During the second week the participants designed one of four ICs based on circuit specifications for automotive applications. Our experiences in the planning and execution of this course can provide guidance for others considering the development of an industry-sponsored course View full abstract»

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  • Control systems curriculum national survey

    Page(s): 257 - 263
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    The IEEE Control Systems Society Education Committee conducted a curriculum survey on control education in 1990-1991. Out of 224 schools contacted, 143 schools responded. The results of the survey are reported in this paper View full abstract»

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  • An improved method of scaling for real-time signal processing applications

    Page(s): 281 - 288
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (684 KB)  

    Implementing digital signal processing algorithms using fixed-point arithmetic is a difficult task, involving trade-offs to balance the efficiency and noise performance of a given realization. One of the most important components of such design is to minimize the noise generated by quantization and over flow effects. This is generally accomplished by the scaling of signals and coefficients in the fixed-point realization based upon knowledge of signal features and statistics. This paper presents a new method for structuring this design task. It uses a model based on scaled-fractional numbers to simplify both the concepts required to realize fixed-point arithmetic versions of algorithms, as well as the real effort required for such implementations. This model has been implemented as a data type in a high level computer language to allow direct implementation of fixed-point arithmetic versions of algorithms View full abstract»

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  • Animated models for teaching aspects of computer systems organization

    Page(s): 247 - 256
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (776 KB)  

    A computer simulator of a simple processor has been developed to help teach aspects of computer systems organization to first-year BSc undergraduates. The software provides an animated environment which allows the learner to explore the execution of macro- and microcode and electronic activity in computers within the framework of a pedagogical microprocessor. As programs are executed, the flows of data, addresses, and instructions are animated on functional diagrams. The learner is able to write machine-code programs using an existing basic instruction set and observe these being `executed' as a series of animated operations. In addition, the learner may specify microprograms to augment the basic instruction set. The behavior of CPU functional units (ALU, control unit, registers, etc.) may be examined by selecting more detailed models of these subsystems. Students use the software individually and in small groups by working through a series of exercises from a manual. In addition to describing the software, this paper comments on its use on the undergraduate course and concludes by outlining plans for its future development View full abstract»

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  • A new graduate course on neural networks

    Page(s): 277 - 280
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (412 KB)  

    A new neural network course at the graduate level is described. The course is offered at the computer engineering department but is intended for a wider audience. It is currently taken as a technical elective by master's students at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). The course's main topics are: foundations of neural computation; architectures of neural networks; learning; dynamics; feedback models; VLSI implementations; parallel processing; and fault-tolerance. The course is not a survey of neural network models, learning algorithms, etc. It is instead an in-depth presentation of neural computing principles with illustrations from few but diverse models View full abstract»

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  • Digital control of a tank system

    Page(s): 271 - 276
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB)  

    This paper describes the laboratory environment for experiments in digital control of a coupled tank system. The control process consists of upper and lower containers with draining orifices. As the cross section of the lower container varies with the level, the dynamic of the process changes extensively with the selected steady-state operating level. Measurements of the tank levels are available, while the flow rate into the upper tank is forced by a pump driven by an electric motor. A nonlinear model is employed to study various features of the process. The control strategy is to stabilize the level in the lower tank by adjustment of the flow rate into the upper tank. An IBM AT, equipped with a universal analog input/output board is used to control the process. The interactive real-time software frame, available under MS-DOS, uses selectable operating modes to analyze the performance of different control algorithms. A digital state-feedback algorithm is presented as an illustration View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University