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IEEE Software

Issue 4 • July 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • Measurement based process improvement

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):8 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (769 KB)

    Used together, the two relatively young concepts of measurement and process improvement are more than the sum of their parts. Careful measurement helps you draw an objective process model. Thoughtful application of improvement techniques improves your ability to measure quality. Leveraging one with the other can take your organization to new heights. The article shows how software process modeling... View full abstract»

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  • Achieving higher SEI levels

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):17 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (27)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (834 KB)

    Two years or more can pass between formal SEI (Software Engineering Institute) assessments using the Capability Maturity Model (CMM). An organization seeking to monitor its progress to a higher SEI level needs a method for internally conducting incremental assessments. The author provides one that has proven successful at Motorola. A method was developed for assessing progress to higher SEI levels... View full abstract»

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  • Bootstrap: fine-tuning process assessment

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):25 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (34)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2254 KB)

    Bootstrap was a project done as part of the European Strategic Program for Research in Information Technology. Its goal was to develop a method for software-process assessment, quantitative measurement, and improvement. In executing that goal, Bootstrap enhanced and refined the Software Engineering Institute's process-assessment method and adapted it to the needs of the European software industry-... View full abstract»

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  • People, organizations, and process improvement

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):36 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (152)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1253 KB)

    In their efforts to determine how technology affects the software development process, researchers often overlook organizational and social issues. The authors report on two experiments to discover how developers spend their time. They describe how noncoding activities can use up development time and how even a reluctance to use e-mail can influence the development process. The first experiment wa... View full abstract»

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  • Key lessons in achieving widespread inspection use

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):46 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (31)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1253 KB)

    Hewlett-Packard has distilled its experience in promoting software inspections into a model of how technology adoption occurs and a metric of where it stands. Its managers know when and how to accelerate efforts to adopt inspections and other best practices. Experience has shown that the return on investment in technology adoption efforts can be huge. At HP, inspection technology was adopted acros... View full abstract»

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  • Software process evolution at the SEL

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):58 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (46)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1226 KB)

    The Software Engineering Laboratory of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center has been adapting, analyzing, and evolving software processes for the last 18 years (1976-94). Their approach is based on the Quality Improvement Paradigm, which is used to evaluate process effects on both product and people. The authors explain this approach as it was applied to ... View full abstract»

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  • Improving software maintenance at Martin Marietta

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):67 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1410 KB)

    Using data collected throughout a major project, the authors apply common statistical methods to quantitatively assess and evaluate improvements in a large contractor's software-maintenance process. Results show where improvements are needed; examining the change in statistical results lets you quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of the improvements. We selected a process-assessment methodol... View full abstract»

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  • Process improvement through data reuse

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):76 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1377 KB)

    An approach that provides a process model, repository, and structured planning to transform data into meaningful management tasks helps organizations achieve the elusive goal of continuous process improvement. The approach was used in enhancing maintenance processes in a software house that develops banking systems.<> View full abstract»

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  • Science and substance: a challenge to software engineers

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):86 - 95
    Cited by:  Papers (95)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1249 KB)

    For 25 years, software researchers have proposed improving software development and maintenance with new practices whose effectiveness is rarely, if ever, backed up by hard evidence. We suggest several ways to address the problem, and we challenge the community to invest in being more scientific.<> View full abstract»

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  • Interfaces for intermediates

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):96 - 99
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (901 KB)

    Intermediates (those who are neither beginners nor old hands, and who make up most of the user population) are perhaps the most neglected user segment in terms of interface design, yet there are possibly more intermediate users than beginners or experts. The author urges interface designers to take note of this segment and details a transitional interface well-suited for bridging the gap between n... View full abstract»

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  • Rewards of taking the path less traveled

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):100 - 101
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (426 KB)

    In the software-engineering industry, it seems that hordes of professionals all follow one of a half-dozen or so well-trod "lemming paths". Each path corresponds to a "technology" whose proponents have made outrageous claims that its use will result in great increases in quality or productivity or whatever. Although the paths may lead to great results, nobody on the path really knows. In fact, not... View full abstract»

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  • Why and how of requirements tracing

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):104 - 106
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (322 KB)

    While requirements traceability is explicitly required in US Department of Defense software contracts, it is often hard to sell in other situations. This article explains how Abbott Laboratories Diagnostics Division approaches traceability. To illustrate our program, we describe how we applied it to an R&D project to develop an embedded, real-time in vitro diagnostic instrument. The software is pa... View full abstract»

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  • Top-down vs. bottom-up process improvement

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):12 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (252 KB)

    There are two approaches to process improvement. The top-down approach compares an organization's process with some generally accepted standard process. Process improvement is then the elimination of differences between an existing process and a standard one. The assumption is that, once the process is changed the generated products will be improved-or at least the risk of generating new software ... View full abstract»

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Diomidis Spinellis
Athens University of Economics and Business
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