Computer

Issue 7 • July 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • 32-bit computing: road to confusion?

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):13 - 14
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (256 KB)

    Software engineers may easily feel perplexed over the multitude of operating systems that are now emerging for the 32-bit desktop environment. OS/2, NextStep, the Mac's operating system, and Unix have been around for years; NT is still fresh and needs to prove itself: and technology such as Taligent and Chicago (Windows 4.0) have yet to emerge. Each 32-bit operating system seems to be taking such ... View full abstract»

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  • Visualizing features and tracking their evolution

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):20 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (73)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1054 KB)

    We describe basic algorithms to extract coherent amorphous regions (features or objects) from 2 and 3D scalar and vector fields and then track them in a series of consecutive time steps. We use a combination of techniques from computer vision, image processing, computer graphics, and computational geometry and apply them to data sets from computational fluid dynamics. We demonstrate how these tech... View full abstract»

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  • Volume models for volumetric data

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):28 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (911 KB)

    Given a set of points on the boundary of an object derived from volumetric data, how can one represent the object and, in particular visualize it from these points? This problem is addressed by our research on the representation of points at the boundary of an object as a union of simple boundary primitives. We use volumetric data in the customary sense, but an additional feature for our purpose i... View full abstract»

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  • Distributed and collaborative visualization

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):37 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (20)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (697 KB)

    Visualization typically involves large computational tasks, often performed on supercomputers. The results of these tasks are usually analyzed by a design team consisting of several members. Our goal is to depart from traditional single-user systems and build a low-cost scientific visualization environment that enables computer-supported cooperative work in the distributed setting. A synchronously... View full abstract»

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  • Parallel visualization algorithms: performance and architectural implications

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):45 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (48)  |  Patents (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1254 KB)

    Recently, a new class of scalable, shared-address-space multiprocessors has emerged. Like message-passing machines, these multiprocessors have a distributed interconnection network and physically distributed main memory. However, they provide hardware support for efficient implicit communication through a shared address space, and they automatically exploit temporal locality by caching both local ... View full abstract»

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  • Glyphmaker: creating customized visualizations of complex data

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):57 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (54)  |  Patents (10)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (858 KB)

    Glyphmaker allows nonexpert users to customize their own graphical representations using a simple glyph editor and a point-and-click binding mechanism. In particular, users can create and then alter bindings to visual representations, bring in new data or glyphs with associated bindings, change ranges for bound data, and do these operations interactively. They can also focus on data down to any le... View full abstract»

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  • Interactive visualization of Earth and space science computations

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):65 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (29)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (839 KB)

    Scientists often view computer algorithms as risk-filled black boxes. The barrier between scientists and their computations can be bridged by techniques that make the internal workings of algorithms visible and that allow scientists to experiment with their computations. We describe two interactive systems developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC)... View full abstract»

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  • Interactive methods for visualizable geometry

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):73 - 83
    Cited by:  Papers (15)  |  Patents (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1179 KB)

    Interactive computer graphics can provide new insights into the objects of pure geometry, providing intuitively useful images, and, in some cases, unexpected results. Interactive computer graphics systems have opened a new era in the visualization of pure geometry. We demonstrate the fruitful relationship between mathematics and the discipline of computer graphics, emphasizing those areas of low-d... View full abstract»

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  • Fourteen ways to say nothing with scientific visualization

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):86 - 88
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (282 KB)

    In "Twelve Ways to Fool the Masses When Giving Performance Results on Parallel Computers," (see Supercomputer Rev., vol.4, no.8, p.54-5, 1991) David Bailey ends with the admonition, "Conclude your technical presentation and roll the videotape. Audiences love razzle-dazzle color graphics, and this material often helps deflect attention from the substantive technical issues." Unfortunately, Bailey g... View full abstract»

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  • Collaborative modeling and visualization: an EPA HPCC initiative

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):92 - 93
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (245 KB)

    The transfer of high-performance computing and visualization technologies to state environmental protection agencies is an integral part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's High-Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. One aspect of this process involves collaborative modeling for air quality efforts associated with the 1990 Clean Air Act. Another is the use of visualizatio... View full abstract»

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  • How to stop worrying and start loving C++. II

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):104 - 106
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (328 KB)

    The previous session for C++ gurus dealt with the general subject of indirection in C++, specifically the use of "smart pointers" that take the place of *-style variables while improving the reliability and flexibility of your code, see ibid vol. 9 (June 1994). In the present paper we examine the idea of representing collections by overloading operator and then move on to iterators and cursors.< View full abstract»

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  • Economics of software reuse

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):106 - 107
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (268 KB)

    The author discusses the type of software that can and should be reused. At least 10 different software artifacts lend themselves to reusability. Breaking down the cost of manually producing these 10 artifacts lets us create a preliminary analysis of the return on investment (ROI) of reusing them, with an admittedly large margin of error. He discusses the barriers to full software reusability.< View full abstract»

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Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed articles written for and by computer researchers and practitioners representing the full spectrum of computing and information technology, from hardware to software and from emerging research to new applications. 

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Editor-in-Chief
Sumi Helal
Lancaster University
sumi.helal@computer.org