IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine

Issue 3 • June-July 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • Medical technology: a solution to the health care cost problem

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):313 - 315
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (432 KB)

    Examination of U.S. health care problems reveals that the root cause of today's concerns is cost. Unfortunately, technology has been identified by some to be the principal cost escalator. The authors not only believe that this criticism is unjustified, but that medical technology can provide immediate advances in the productivity of health care services, thereby reducing health care costs while in... View full abstract»

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  • Continuous analyte monitoring to aid clinical practice

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):319 - 325
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (424)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1008 KB)

    Considerable progress has been made in the development of practical glucose sensors for in vivo use. In some designs, the sensor can be replaced by the patient, who "injects" a new sensor into a fresh site using a hypodermic needle. An open-loop hypoglycaemia sensor providing an alarm signal could be available soon, and it would be very useful in the management of diabetes. The sensor for this app... View full abstract»

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  • Design of intravascular fiber optic blood gas sensors

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):327 - 335
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1082 KB)

    Arterial blood gas analysis is one of the most frequently requested tests performed on critically ill patients in both the operating room and intensive care unit. Fiber optic sensors are advantageous in that they require no electrical connection to the patient (except to measure temperature) and are low cost and disposable. The author details the design requirements of fiber optic sensors for cont... View full abstract»

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  • Intra-vascular oxygen sensors for neonatal monitoring

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):336 - 346
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1494 KB)

    The following topics are discussed: clinical background; catheter-tip sensors; transport of O/sub 2/ in blood; principles and construction of O/sub 2/ sensors; electrochemical O/sub 2/ measurement; mass spectrometer probes; optical O/sub 2/ sensors; in vivo use; clinical experience; problems of sensors in clinical use; hemocompatibility (blood-polymer interactions); future prospects.<> View full abstract»

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  • Optical oximetry sensors for whole blood and tissue

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):347 - 357
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (7)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1108 KB)

    This article reviews the optical techniques applied to the determination of intravascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation as well as the noninvasive estimation of arterial and tissue saturation. Although in skeletal muscles and brain tissues myoglobin and cytochrome analyses have been demonstrated (F.F. Jobis et al., 1977; K. Kariman et al., 1983), their effects upon absorption and reflection spectra... View full abstract»

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  • Development of an evanescent wave fiber optic biosensor

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):358 - 363
    Cited by:  Papers (32)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (695 KB)

    Biosensors are uniquely qualified to meet the need for rapid, inexpensive analytical procedures. The authors' intent was to develop a simple, real-time immunoassay that could process multiple samples in a semi-automated manner, while maintaining maximum versatility to permit its application under various conditions. To achieve this goal, the authors have developed a biosensor which detects antibod... View full abstract»

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  • Microbial biosensors for process and environmental control

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):364 - 374
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1256 KB)

    For rapid and precise monitoring of the various factors involved in fermentation reactions and environment, it seems entirely sensible to employ the microorganisms themselves, which are highly sensitive to change in their environment. This review has touched upon some of the ways in which microbial sensors might be employed to monitor levels of fermentation substrates, reaction products, nutrients... View full abstract»

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  • Solid-state microsensors for cortical nerve recordings

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):375 - 387
    Cited by:  Papers (40)  |  Patents (13)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1852 KB)

    The author discusses the application of solid-state microsensors and recording microprobes in acquiring neural signals. The combination of precision photolithographic techniques afforded by integrated circuit techniques, and the exacting micromachining capabilities available in silicon enable one to implement biomedical sensors that are smaller, more reproducible, and much more capable in terms of... View full abstract»

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  • Biosensor development at the University of Utah

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):388 - 395
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1079 KB)

    Describes three biosensors: a silicon retina chip, CHEMFET sensors and an optical immunoassay chip utilizing a planar waveguide. These three examples of sensors give a small flavor of the biosensor work ongoing at the University of Utah. Although there are obvious differences between each of these three sensors in terms of their application areas, the parameters measured, and the technologies used... View full abstract»

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  • Applying silicon micromachining to cellular metabolism: measuring the rate of acidification induced in the extracellular environment

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):396 - 401
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (586 KB)

    Describes how a microphysiometer works and shows how silicon micromachining can be used to provide a multichannel capability. The authors consider extracellular acidification, metabolic rate detection, LAPS pH sensors, wells for the capture of nonadherent cells, and a multichannel flow-through microphysiometer chip.<> View full abstract»

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  • A biosensor that monitors cell morphology with electrical fields

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):402 - 408
    Cited by:  Papers (83)  |  Patents (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (702 KB)

    Describes a "whole cell" biosensor that is very useful in the field of animal cell tissue culture and in many ways is akin to the canary in a coal mine. The heart of this method, called ECIS for electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, is a small gold electrode immersed in tissue culture medium. When cells attach and spread on this electrode, the measured electrical impedance changes because the... View full abstract»

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  • Fabricating biomedical sensors with thin-film technology

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):409 - 419
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1254 KB)

    Reviews some of the different chemical and physical sensor structures that have been fabricated using thin- and thick-film technology. Individual reports referenced in this article describe the details of the sensor designs and give calibration characteristics and applications. This article illustrates the wide variety of sensors that are possible using thin- and thick-film microelectronic technol... View full abstract»

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  • Prepper, PhD: DNA purification robotics system

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):424 - 425
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (371 KB)

    This article describes the motivation and engineering trade-offs in the development process of a robot to greatly speed the handling of biological samples. The robot is called Prepper, PhD, (see H.R. Gamer et al., Scientific Computing and Automation, vol.9, no.4, p.61-8, 1993) named after the biological slang term-pop the process to extract and purify DNA from cells. The development of the Prepper... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine contains articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering.

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 2010. The current retitled publication is IEEE Pulse.

Full Aims & Scope