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Proceedings of the IEEE

Issue 7 • Date Jul 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Active and nonlinear wave propagation devices in ultrafast electronics and optoelectronics [and prolog]

    Page(s): 1037 - 1059
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1956 KB)  

    We describe active and nonlinear wave propagation devices for generation and detection of (sub)millimeter wave and (sub)picosecond signals. Shock-wave nonlinear transmission lines (NLTL's) generate ~4-V step functions with less than 0.7-ps fall times. NLTL-gated sampling circuits for signal measurement have attained over 700-GHz bandwidth. Soliton propagation on NLTL's is used for picosecond impulse generation and broadband millimeter-wave frequency multiplication. Picosecond pulses can also be generated on traveling-wave structures loaded by resonant tunneling diodes. Applications include integration of photodetectors with sampling circuits for picosecond optical waveform measurements and instrumentation for millimeter-wave waveform and network (circuit) measurements both on-wafer and in free space. General properties of linear and nonlinear distributed devices and circuits are reviewed, including gain-bandwidth limits, dispersive and nondispersive propagation, shock-wave formation, and soliton propagation View full abstract»

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  • Hardware-software co-design of embedded systems [and prolog]

    Page(s): 967 - 989
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    This paper surveys the design of embedded computer systems, which use software running on programmable computers to implement system functions. Creating an embedded computer system which meets its performance, cost, and design time goals is a hardware-software co-design problem-the design of the hardware and software components influence each other. This paper emphasizes a historical approach to show the relationships between well-understood design problems and the as-yet unsolved problems in co-design. We describe the relationship between hardware and software architecture in the early stages of embedded system design. We describe analysis techniques for hardware and software relevant to the architectural choices required for hardware-software co-design. We also describe design and synthesis techniques for co-design and related problems View full abstract»

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  • Vacuum microelectronic devices [and prolog]

    Page(s): 1006 - 1034
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    In this review/tutorial paper, we cover the history, physics, and current status of vacuum microelectronic devices. First we overview the performance requirements of vacuum microelectronic devices necessary for them to replace, or fill voids left by, solid state devices. Next we discuss the physical characteristics of micro-field-emission sources important to device applications. These characteristics include fundamental features, such as current-voltage data and noise, in addition to engineering considerations, such as life expectancy and procedures for tube assembly. We conclude with a review of a wide variety of demonstrated and proposed devices based on vacuum microelectronic principles, including electron guns, microwave tubes, and flat-panel displays View full abstract»

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  • Detection of non-Gaussian signals: a paradigm for modern statistical signal processing [and prolog]

    Page(s): 1061 - 1095
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    Non-Gaussian signals arise in a wide variety of applications, including sonar, digital communications, seismology, and radio astronomy. In this tutorial overview, a hierarchical approach to signal modeling and detector design for non-Gaussian signals is described. In addition to being of interest in applications, this problem serves as a paradigm within which most of the areas of active research in statistical signal processing arise. In particular, the methodologies of nonlinear signal processing, higher order statistical analysis, signal representations, and learning algorithms, all can be juxtaposed quite naturally in this framework View full abstract»

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  • Predicting the reliability of electronic equipment [and prolog]

    Page(s): 992 - 1004
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    The use of reliability predictions in the design and operation of electronic equipment has been an evolutionary and very controversial process, and over the past decade, reliability prediction methods have been a focal point for a flurry of books, papers, editorials, opinions, special sessions, and workshops. While it is generally believed that reliability assessment methods should be used to aid in product design and development, the integrity and auditability of the reliability prediction methods have been found to be questionable; in that, the models do not predict field failures, cannot be used for comparative purposes, and present misleading trends and relations. This paper discusses the role of reliability prediction and assessment in design, development, and deployment of electronic equipment; overviews the history of reliability predictions for electronics; discusses the advantages and disadvantages of some current methods; and presents some of the key research questions which need to be addressed View full abstract»

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North Carolina State University