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Professional Communication, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date Jun 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Introduction to the special section: professional communication in Russia

    Page(s): 58 - 59
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    There is a rising interest within the world community in what is occurring in professional communication in Russia, and in the social and market opportunities that will appear there in the future. We live in a world in which the pace of change is more rapid than at any time in our history. The most important aspect of this change is the fact that we are making a transition to a democratic society at the same time as we are in the process of establishing the principles of a market economy. Russia is a country with enormous reserves of raw materials, vast territories, and rich intellectual resources. And now, as Russia is experiencing a painful transition to a market economy, the nation's economic potential becomes more and more dependent on the sophistication of its infrastructure. That is the reason why the information technologies and professional communication have become key factors of social progress. The Russian centers of research and industry are widely dispersed geographically, in such cities as Vladivostok, Irkutsk, Novosibirsk, Tomsk, Ekaterinburg, Saint Petersburg and Moscow. The last three or four years have seen a sharp increase in the demands for business information, electronic mail and communications for far-flung business and financial operations View full abstract»

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  • Research and development of hypertext and multimedia systems in Russia

    Page(s): 73 - 74
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    At the end of 1990, a research company (NTC-HINTECH) was formed to develop new information technologies. This article describes a project to define formal algorithms for the creation of a sequence of nodes with certain semantic properties. It also describes a project for developing a generalized hypertext network, in which the relationship between the user and the system is dynamic and flexible View full abstract»

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  • Industrial information in Russia

    Page(s): 66 - 67
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    Describes industrial information, which is information about industrial and consumer products, new technologies, and the engineering decision-making process. Today, in addition to the two information centers from the Soviet era, there are about 70 local information centers and more than 10,000 databases in Russia. The main potential information customer is the Russian government. The August 1991 coup, which led to wide-scale privatization, sharply reduced government subsidies to information centers. The production of information in a computer-readable form is now a large business, but creating this information remains a long and difficult process View full abstract»

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  • The special section on professional communication in Russia: an American perspective

    Page(s): 60 - 61
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    Enormous changes that have taken place in the last few years in Russia have revealed a need for Russian technical communicators to refocus their expertise and skills in order to enter the global marketplace successfully and competitively. Rather than dwell on the familiar differences between Americans and Russians, Cold War adversaries, a common ground exists and is growing. We share a mutual interest in the successful entry of Russian technical communicators in the global marketplace. We also share an understanding that technology is central to civilization as we know it, and that the masters of technology have a substantial influence on all activities that they touch; a belief that technology has had a major beneficial effect on the peoples of the world, but that with such power comes the potential for large, serious, and potentially devastating influences; the idea that the embrace of technology is a good cultural fit with cultures formed from revolutions, for technology in the later part of this century has come to be synonymous with rapid change, and cultures with revolutionary heritage welcome change; the notion that technological breakthroughs have profound influences on the nature of work, liberating the traditional intensive physical nature of labor to the emergence of a knowledge worker; and the belief that the global marketplace forces the need for clear and rapid communication across borders, as well as among cultures. If we can agree on these technical communications issues, then we have a firm foundation for building a gateway to communication in the global market View full abstract»

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  • Non-commercial computer networking in Russia

    Page(s): 70 - 72
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    This paper discusses the needs of the Russian academic and research community in non-commercial networking, as well as the technical base for it. It also describes developments in SUEARN (Soviet Union/European Academic and Research Network) and FREEnet (Network For Research, Education and Engineering) View full abstract»

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  • The Scientific and Technical Information Center of Russia

    Page(s): 62 - 65
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    Describes Russia's specialized agencies, which are now actively engaged in their own research and development activities, surveys the influence of the 1989 political and economic changes on the structure and ideology of information networks, and describes VNTIC's current information activities View full abstract»

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  • User manuals as project management tools. I. Theoretical background

    Page(s): 75 - 80
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    The failure of a delivered information system (IS) to match users' expectations of it is a frequent cause of project failure. This paper examines some of the causes of expectation failure, in particular the development of inappropriate mental models of a new IS by users. The documents traditionally used to express the requirements for a new IS are seldom fully understood by users, and often prove hard to verify. Documents written for, with, and sometimes by the users-the user manuals-have proved more successful in these respects View full abstract»

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  • Mark Twain-technical writer

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    Those who have read “Roughing It” or “Life on the Mississippi” or “Pudd'nhead Wilson” will have seen Mark Twain's flair for technical descriptions and definitions. You know that he liked nothing better than turning a challenging process or device or term into a clear picture for the reader. His descriptions of a quartz mill, of assaying, and of pocket mining in “Roughing It” are models of fine technical style, as are his descriptions of sounding in “Life on the Mississippi” and fingerprinting in “Pudd'nhead Wilson”. His definition of “lagniappe” is a classic. But Mark Twain was more than a practitioner of technical writing: he was also a theorist about the qualities of the writing craft. His novels, letters, essays, and miscellaneous prose are sprinkled with comments on writing, comments that can be made to read like a set of rules. And that is what the author does in this article: he turns these scattered comments into a list View full abstract»

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  • SOVAM TELEPORT: telecommunications in Russia and abroad

    Page(s): 68 - 69
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    Describes the background of the creation of SOVAM TELEPORT, the first Soviet-American venture to offer international telecommunication services using computer networks, analyzes the problems it has faced and how it has attempted to solve them, describes the organization's customers and services, and speculates on the synergistic relationship between Russian society and its telecommunications industry View full abstract»

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  • Technical communication practices of Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists: international perspectives on aerospace

    Page(s): 97 - 107
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    As part of Phase 4 of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, studies were conducted that investigated the technical communications practices of Dutch and U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. The studies had the following objectives: (1) to solicit the opinions of aerospace engineers and scientists regarding the importance of technical communication to their professions, (2) to determine the use and production of technical communication by aerospace engineers and scientists, (3) to investigate their use of libraries and technical information centers, (4) to investigate their use of and the importance to them of computer and information technology, (5) to examine their use of electronic networks, and (6) to determine their use of foreign and domestically produced technical reports. Self-administered (mail) questionnaires were distributed to Dutch aerospace engineers and scientists at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR) in the Netherlands, the NASA Ames Research Center in the USA, and the NASA Langley Research Center in the USA. Responses of the Dutch and US participants to selected questions are presented in this paper View full abstract»

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  • Issue trees: a tool to aid the engineering writer

    Page(s): 88 - 96
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    The paper surveys studies of the process model for understanding writing, focusing in particular on problem-solving strategies in the writing process. It then presents a case study of the use of issue trees-a hierarchal network of goals not unlike the decision trees used in management science and artificial intelligence-to guide the writing process of the second author as he wrote a technical report. A good issue tree shows the relationships between various pieces of information: which information is central and which is supportive or incidental. Issue trees offer engineers a visual view of their writing plan. By building a hierarchal issue tree to illustrate the logical links of the proposed writing task, the engineer can put an overlay of “technology” on the task of writing-an overlay that may “trick” the unwilling writer into writing, and writing well View full abstract»

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  • Single-source manuals

    Page(s): 81 - 87
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    Because corporations today face fierce international competition, they must produce and maintain high-quality documentation-but at minimal cost. Optimizing a writer's time and effort will no doubt become a key study area as we try to do more with less, without sacrificing quality. One way to increase a technical writer's productivity is to design documentation so that it covers a broader product area. This approach gets more use (or reuse) of the text. The paper describes the productivity and cost benefits of creating single-source manuals, that is, two or more manuals output from the same set of source files created and updated by one writer. It also describes how to create single-source manuals based on an actual case View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to applied research on professional communication--including but not limited to technical and business communication. It has been published since 1957 by the Professional Communication Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Saul Carliner
Concordia University