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IEEE Technology and Society Magazine

Issue 2 • Date Summer 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 4 of 4
  • Environmental panic

    Publication Year: 1994
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (303 KB)

    Provides a letter and a response concerning the environmental panic of lead as a poisonous substance. It considers the role engineers should play, which is one which provides the best risk assessments, and which can help prioritize costs and benefit so that our efforts are aimed at the most important problems and not the ones with the most hysteria.<> View full abstract»

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  • Consulting end-users on infrastructure worth

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):10 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1365 KB)

    Considers how a methodological approach is evolving in the electric utility industry to determine users' evaluation of the worth of electric service and as a means to conduct realistic cost/benefit analysis at the planning stage. The essence of the argument is that, only if the worth of our infrastructure is known can defensible decisions be taken with respect to the expenditures to maintain or re... View full abstract»

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  • World War II: a watershed in electrical engineering education

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):17 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (998 KB)

    There is little doubt that World War II was a watershed in the history of electrical engineering (EE) education in the United States. Having watched physicists outperform electrical engineers in wartime laboratories, prominent educators like Frederick Terman at Stanford returned to their universities and overhauled EE programs by introducing more mathematics, science and electronics into the curri... View full abstract»

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  • Hidden costs and benefits of government card technologies

    Publication Year: 1994, Page(s):24 - 32
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1236 KB)

    The current health-care debate and the ongoing budget debates highlight the widely varying cost estimates for government programs, many of which use information technology. Information technology alone does not necessarily improve productivity or reduce costs, however, and it is often oversold as a panacea for solving all of what ails an organization or a society. The infusion of information techn... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The following topics describe the scope of IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology (IEEE SSIT) and of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine : Health and safety implications of technology, Engineering ethics and professional responsibility, Engineering education in social implications of technology, History of electrotechnology, Technical expertise and public policy, Social issues related to energy, Social issues related to information technology, Social issues related to telecommunications, Systems analysis in public policy decisions, Economic issues related to technology, Peace technology, and Environmental implications of technology. Beyond these specific topics, IEEE Technology and Society Magazine  is concerned with the broad area of the social implications of technology, especially electrotechnology.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Katina Michael
School of Information Systems and Technology
University of Wollongong