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Military Electronics, IRE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date Dec. 1957

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Front inside cover]

    Page(s): c2
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  • Announcement of M. Barry Carlton Award

    Page(s): 33
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  • Editorial

    Page(s): 34
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  • A message from the national chairman

    Page(s): 35
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  • Instrument landing at sea

    Page(s): 36 - 43
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    The paper is a narrative account of two years of intensive effort by the Navy and civilian engineers which, after many trying periods, achieved success on July 30, 1935, when a completely hooded instrument landing was made aboard the aircraft carrier, USS Langley, 100 miles at sea off San Diego, Calif. In the summer of 1933, when the aircraft carrier emerged as the future striking power of our Navy, Rear Admiral Ernest King, Chief of the Bureau of Aeronautics (later Fleet Admiral King), was hunting for every means to improve the capability of our carriers. One of the most important was their ability to operate in all types of weather. As a result of his examination of the Bureau of Standards' development work on an instrument landing system, he negotiated a contract with the Washington Institute of Technology to apply the basic principles and modify this system for aircraft carrier operations. The Washington Institute of Technology was formed specifically for the purpose of developing this system under the presidency of Sidney Mashbir. The development engineers were Gomer Davies and Dr. Frank G. Kear. Lieutenant Frank Akers, U. S. Navy (now Rear Admiral), was designated the project officer and flight test pilot for this effort. The small field at College Park, Md., was chosen as the location for the tests. Throughout the fall and winter of 1933 and 1934, the equipment was built and many test flights made. A satisfactory installation was completed so that by May, 1934, completely hooded instrument landings were being made regularly at the College Park Airport. Satisfied with the success of the ground installation, Admiral King decided to have the equipment installed aboard our first aircraft carrier, the USS Langley. The structural work was done at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard at Portsmouth, Va. The Langley sailed back with the fleet to the Pacific Ocean. The equipment installation was completed by the fall of 1934 and flight tests began. Many unexpected problems wer- encountered particularly in regard to the glide path and localizer. These resulted in some rather major modifications, but eventually they were solved and an entirely satisfactory system was completed which resulted in the successful landing at sea by Lt. Akers on July 30, 1935. View full abstract»

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  • Space exploration — The new challenge to the electronics industry

    Page(s): 43 - 48
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    The electronics industry today faces its greatest challenge, the development of a system to control remotely a space-research vehicle. It must prepare man's path into space. A two-way radio data link will be one specific goal. This link should transfer data between Earth and vehicle to provide guidance and observation data, and to permit control of vehicle trajectory and instrumentation through an Earth-to-vehicle control loop. The system should operate out to Mars, a distance of 50 million miles, under extremes of temperature and radiation far above present standards, and with self-contained power sources. A radar-beacon data link providing guidance through a simple inertial autopilot would appear to be a reasonable approach, based upon extensions to presently-developed techniques. Operating with Earth-based, 500-mc radars resembling present trans-horizon communications equipment, a vehicle beacon of 2-kw output power would permit vehicle orbiting of the Moon; 6 megw would be required to reach Mars. The respective Earth transmitters would require 200-kw and 600-megw power output. Present remote-control equipment will not meet all the above needs; significant advances must be made before man can venture with confidence into space. View full abstract»

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  • New look at submarines

    Page(s): 49 - 52
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    THE submarine of the future promises to be the most versatile and most powerful warship ever conceived by man. The appearance of this new submarine will pose tasks for all engineers in finding counter-measures and I think that it is timely to begin thinking about that now. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 52
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1962. The new retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.

Full Aims & Scope