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Military Electronics, IRE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Dec. 1958

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • [Front inside cover]

    Page(s): c2
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  • Harry Davis

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest editorial

    Page(s): 2
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  • Our interest in space and its technology

    Page(s): 3 - 7
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    The urge to learn more about the space surrounding the earth has been strong throughout mankind's recorded history, the incentive coming sometimes from primitive religion, sometimes from scientific curiosity, and ofttimes from a love of natural beauty. Today we can add to these the incentive of our newly acquired capability of penetrating into this space with instrumented and manned vehicles. We already know much about the solar system and a little about the universe beyond. We have some knowledge of the physical existence and the motion of the planets and their satellites, the asteroids, the comets and the meteors; the composition of these bodies is also somewhat known. The nature of the electromagnetic and particle radiations from the sun and extra solar system sources are less completely known and will be the continuing objective of some of our early scientific explorations of solar space. View full abstract»

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  • Some aspects of astronautics

    Page(s): 8 - 19
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    This paper is mainly concerned with four general topics of importance in astronautics: 1) Basic laws of celestial mechanics. The subjects covered are: Kepler's laws and their Newtonian redevelopment, the orbital elements, and perturbations. 2) Lunar and interplanetary flights. A typical earth-moon transit trajectory, computed by automatic machine, is discussed. Guidance accuracies required for lunar impact are illustrated. Circumlunar flights, lunar satellites, and interplanetary flights are also briefly discussed. 3) The space environment. Among the subjects covered are: the distribution and characteristics of dust and meteoric material in the solar system; asteroids; comets; molecular, atomic, and subatomic particles in space; the possible lunar atmosphere and ionosphere; extraterrestrial radio noise; and the magnetic fields of the earth and sun. 4) Scientific experimentation in space. Useful subjects for experimentation are: refinement of our knowledge of basic constants such as the value of the astronomical unit; observation of the atmospheric and surface conditions of the moon and of our neighbor planets; increased observation of matter and radiation in space. View full abstract»

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  • Space communications

    Page(s): 20 - 24
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    Preliminary design parameters for space communications can be estimated by standard application of the radiation range equation and of communication-theoretic equations relating channel capacity to bandwidth and signal-to-noise ratio. An example is given for a hypothetical situation involving communication between a space vehicle and a receiver located on the earth's surface, for various communication ranges. Preliminary estimates of this type also serve to indicate areas of research and development which will be of importance in space communications. Some of the areas briefly mentioned are: components (vehicle and surface antennas, sensitive receivers, highly reliable circuit components, and electrical power sources); signal storage, encoding, and processing techniques; tracking and acquisition techniques; and studies of the physical environment (extraterrestrial noise, component environment, and electromagnetic propagation environment in space). View full abstract»

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  • Self-contained guidance systems

    Page(s): 25 - 35
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    Inertial guidance is based on the use of reference coordinates established by applications of Newton's Laws of Motion to self-contained systems. Gyro units carried by servo-powered gimbals give accurate information on preset angular positions that may be used to supply the function of the celestial sphere in conventional navigation. Changes in position are indicated by integration of acceleration components along axes fixed to the gyro-stabilized member. When vehicles moving over or near the earth's surface are involved, the use of Schuler tuning to give vertical indications unaffected by linear acceleration makes accurate long-range inertial guidance possible. Because in all cases only the laws of gravity and classical mechanics are involved, inertial guidance systems are generally free from interference, short of actual physical damage. Systems based on gyro units and accelerometers are made possible only by modern developments in mechanical design, materials, electronics, and servomechanism techniques. Illustrative examples are given and discussed to bring out the nature of the problems involved. Beyond question, the future holds many applications of inertial principles to a wide range of guidance problems. View full abstract»

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  • Baseline guidance systems

    Page(s): 36 - 44
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    This paper surveys the principles underlying the radio guidance and tracking of space vehicles. The various techniques which can be used for obtaining position and/or velocity information are described and their relative merits are assessed. The limitations imposed by tropospheric and ionospheric noise on radio systems are also discussed. Finally, two specific examples are worked out, illustrating the translation of radar guidance errors into flight uncertainties in the trajectories of ICBM's and satellites. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 45 - 46
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  • Call for papers

    Page(s): 46
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1962. The new retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.

Full Aims & Scope