By Topic

Military Electronics, IRE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date March 1957

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (482 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Front inside cover]

    Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (961 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editorial

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2002 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • PGMIL's “Place in the Sun”

    Page(s): 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1881 KB)  

    It is indeed an honor to be invited to submit an article to the very first issue of the PGMIL Transactions. I have had a sort of “preview” of the list of articles to be included in this first issue and the editors are to be congratulated on their selections. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A message from your national chairman, PGMIL

    Page(s): 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2070 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Electronics and National Defense

    Page(s): 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2070 KB)  

    Electronics has found application in almost every phase of warfare. One can go further and state that modern weapons systems would not be possible without reliable electronic equipment. Since technology is always changing rapidly, the military functions of logistics, weapon control, intelligence, and command call for an ever-improving pattern of electronic aids in order to keep pace with the supersonic missiles and the destructiveness of atomic weapons. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Operations research

    Page(s): 4 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3478 KB)  

    IN THE physical sciences — physics, chemistry, and many branches of engineering — one starts studying a phenomenon by picking some phase or aspect of it, by observing some part of its manifold behavior. According to folklore, Newton started his study of gravitation by watching the fall of an apple, not the breaking of the apple stem, not the apple's bounce as it hit, but its falling to the ground. Next, after observation, in the physical sciences one tries to form a quantitative hypothesis, a mathematical model of the aspect observed, which will duplicate quantitatively some of its behavior. If one has been clever, or lucky, in his choice of model, its mathematical framework will go beyond the observations, will predict what might happen in other circumstances. Newton's gravitational hypothesis, for example, his mathematical model of action at a distance, predicted the possible motions of a baseball, of a bullet, and of the moon. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The great discovery of modern mathematics

    Page(s): 10 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3772 KB)  

    This is not intended to be free verse. Writing each phrase on a separate line facilitates rapid reading, and everyone is in a hurry nowadays. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Battle Scars of Military Electronics — The Scharnhorst break-through

    Page(s): 19 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3567 KB)  

    This paper opens our Famous Battle Series with an account — from an electronic point of view — of the daring escape up the English Channel of the German ships Scharnhorst, Gneisenau, and Prinz Eugen during World War II. We hope to follow this in a later issue with an analysis from the German side. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Will science come to an end?

    Page(s): 26 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3681 KB)  

    WE LIVE in an era of tremendous advances of science and technology, and almost every month brings some exciting new development. The progress of scientific research is accelerating from year to year, and the number of persons involved in scientific inquiry increases correspondingly. Our big telescopes search into the far corners of the stellar universe, bringing us invaluable information about its present and its past. Our giant multibillion-volt atom smashers help us solve the secrets of the elementary particles from which all material bodies are made, and advanced methods of modern biological studies bring us to the verge of solving the mystery of all mysteries: the nature of life. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Contributors

    Page(s): 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2017 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1962. The new retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.

Full Aims & Scope