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Pervasive Computing, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Apr.-June. 2014

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  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c2 - 1
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  • Pervasive Change Challenges Elders

    Page(s): 2 - 4
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  • A Note on Smart Textiles

    Page(s): 5 - 6
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  • Wearable Computing

    Page(s): 7 - 9
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  • Digital Health Devices for Everyone!

    Page(s): 10 - 13
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  • Leveraging Wi-Fi Signals to Monitor Human Queues

    Page(s): 14 - 17
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    A new approach exploits existing Wi-Fi infrastructure to extract unique Wi-Fi signal patterns from the smartphones of people in lines to estimate wait times. The approach can work under real-world queue scenarios in various environments without requiring a specialized infrastructure or incurring manpower overhead. Furthermore, it only requires that a small fraction of people waiting in line use Wi-Fi on their smartphones. View full abstract»

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  • Pervasive Analytics and Citizen Science [Guest editors' introduction]

    Page(s): 18 - 19
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  • Taking Participatory Citizen Science to Extremes

    Page(s): 20 - 29
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    University College London's Extreme Citizen Science research group (UCL ExCiteS) is experimenting with ways to incorporate the most marginalized communities into participatory citizen science activities through which they can share their indigenous knowledge. The group works with communities at the extremes of the globalized world--both because of nonliteracy and the remote or forbidding environments they inhabit. These groups are the gatekeepers of some key environments on which the future health of the planet depend--from tropical forests to Arctic sea-ice. This article presents the methodologies and tools the group is developing to give these people a voice. This article is part of a special issue on pervasive analytics and citizen science. View full abstract»

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  • Mining Urban Deprivation from Foursquare: Implicit Crowdsourcing of City Land Use

    Page(s): 30 - 36
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    Research has shown a relationship between the physical characteristics of a city neighborhood (such as the presence of playgrounds and fast-food outlets) and neighborhood deprivation as defined in socioeconomic indices. Official land-use data has often been the source for such research. This article examines the viability of using social-networking data as an alternative source. The authors study all venues on the Foursquare location-mapping application across a variety of London census areas. They study the relationship between the presence of different venues in an area and its score on the socioeconomic Index of Multiple Deprivation. They conclude that knowing which venues are hosted by which community offers not only insights into neighborhood deprivation but also a reasonable way of predicting community deprivation scores at fine-grained temporal resolutions. This article is part of a special issue on pervasive analytics and citizen science. View full abstract»

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  • Mining Private Information from Public Data: The Transantiago Case

    Page(s): 37 - 43
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    Transantiago, the smartcard-based public transportation system in Santiago, Chile, includes both a subway system and buses. An online information system lets card holders find detailed trip information, including start time and location, as well as frequency and type of transportation used, by simply providing its card ID. This article studies the privacy implications of the availability of the Transantiago online information system. The authors explore how much of a card holder's information and behavior could be extracted from something as simple as their card ID. They concluded that, given that the corresponding card IDs are known, they can use simple statistical techniques to correctly predict the nearest public transport station to the homes of more than half of the users. This article is part of a special issue on pervasive analytics and citizen science. View full abstract»

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  • Public Goods: Using Pervasive Computing to Inspire Grassroots Activism

    Page(s): 44 - 51
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    Pervasive computing technology enables social mapping and sharing of local knowledge to create relationships beyond established social and cultural boundaries; it also enables the development of new practices around place, identity, and community. For more than a decade, the authors have explored the potential costs and benefits of using pervasive computing to facilitate codiscovery with communities across London, with the aim of supporting grassroots activities that help urban communities take action toward environmental sustainability. A core ingredient of these explorations is the making of artifacts to provide both the focus for communal experiences and a way to create public goods--that is, tangible representations of the intangible things we value most about our communities. Specific projects explore alternative material representations of stories, skills, games, songs, techniques, memories, hyper-local lore, and experiential knowledge of the environment. In this article, the authors present work that investigates how public goods can provide the focus for the development of grassroots community groups focused on hyper-local concerns. They also show how creating objects constructed to communicate the activist message of these communities in a tangible manner provides more affective and illustrative ways to facilitate the codiscovery of uncommon insights. This article is part of a special issue on pervasive analytics and citizen science. View full abstract»

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  • A Secure Supply-Chain RFID System that Respects Your Privacy

    Page(s): 52 - 60
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    Supply-chain RFID systems introduce significant privacy issues to consumers, making it necessary to encrypt communications. Because the resources available on tags are very small, it is generally assumed that only symmetric-key cryptography can be used in such systems. Unfortunately, symmetric-key cryptography imposes negative trust issues between the various stake-holders, and risks compromising the security of the whole system if even a single tag is reverse engineered. This work presents a working prototype implementation of a secure RFID system which uses public-key cryptography to simplify deployment, reduce trust issues between the supply-chain owner and tag manufacturer, and protect user privacy. The authors' prototype system consists of a UHF tag running custom firmware, a standard off-the-shelf reader and custom point-of-sale terminal software. No modifications were made to the reader or the air interface, proving that high-security EPC tags and standard EPC tags can coexist and share the same infrastructure. View full abstract»

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  • Push Notification Mechanisms for Pervasive Smartphone Applications

    Page(s): 61 - 71
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    Smartphones have emerged as ubiquitous devices that are being used to host a rich array of pervasive apps in diverse areas, including healthcare, gaming, and social networking. A key requirement of many of these apps is that they keep their mobile users up-to-date as changes occur in some subject of interest. One way of providing timely updates to smartphone apps is to use push notification technology. In this article, the authors identify design issues for push notification systems and reveal underlying concepts for the notification channels that bind mobile devices to push services. They describe five service offerings and report on the performance of their channels based on an empirical study. View full abstract»

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  • Building a Practical Wi-Fi-Based Indoor Navigation System

    Page(s): 72 - 79
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    This article presents the seven-step process involved in building a practical Wi-Fi-based indoor navigation system, which was implemented at the COEX complex in Seoul, Korea, in October 2010. The article describes the primary activities in each step using the COEX example. More than 200,000 users have downloaded the system since its first release. The successful launch of the COEX indoor navigation system suggests that indoor navigation is becoming a reality. View full abstract»

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  • Two-Way Communication between Working Dogs and Their Handlers

    Page(s): 80 - 83
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    The Facilitating Interactions for Dogs with Occupations (FIDO) project in the Animal Interaction Lab at Georgia Tech aims to facilitate communication between working dogs and their handlers. Here, the authors discuss their research on testing a working dog's ability to perform distinct tasks in response to vibrations at different points on their body. View full abstract»

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  • Behavioral Imaging and Autism

    Page(s): 84 - 87
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    Behavioral imaging encompasses the use of computational sensing and modeling techniques to measure and analyze human behavior. This article discusses a research program focused on the study of dyadic social interactions between children and their caregivers and peers. The study has resulted in a dataset containing semi-structured play interactions between children and adults. Behavioral imaging could broadly affect the quality of care for individuals with a developmental or behavioral disorder. View full abstract»

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  • Membership Matters [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 88
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  • IEEE CG&A calls for papers

    Page(s): c3
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  • Software Experts Summit [Advertisement]

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Aims & Scope

All aspects of current mobile computing research and applications development, including architectures, support services, algorithms and protocols, mobile environments, mobile communication systems, applications, emerging technologies, and societal impacts.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dr. Roy Want
Intel Research