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Computer

Issue 4 • Date Apr. 2014

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 32
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Fuel Your Imagination [advertisement]

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Masthead]

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • Computer Highlights Society Magazines

    Page(s): 4 - 5
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Service Selection and Recommendation through Collective Intelligence

    Page(s): 6
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Doug Van Houweling: Building the NSFNet

    Page(s): 7 - 9
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Readers' Choice [Intellectual Property laws]

    Page(s): 10 - 12
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 32 & 16 Years Ago

    Page(s): 13 - 14
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  • News Briefs

    Page(s): 15 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2425 KB)  

    Topics include the biggest distributed denial-of-service ever measured, the IPv4 address shortage, the cooling of supercomputers by immersing them in liquid, a report naming Java as the leading malware target, a new headset that beams video directly into users' eyes, an ear-based computer controlled by facial movements, software that makes cloud operations more efficient, new technology that lets Wi-Fi users borrow others' bandwidth when needed, and a sensor that helps people grow plants better. View full abstract»

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  • Aware Computing [Guest editors' introduction]

    Page(s): 20 - 21
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Rethinking Context: Leveraging Human and Machine Computation in Disaster Response

    Page(s): 22 - 27
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    Human-computer systems that treat context simply as enumerated facts, rules, or axioms about the surrounding physical and social environment will always have trouble handling information requiring human pragmatic interpretation. One way to overcome such limitations is to draw upon human pragmatic awareness to create hybrid systems capable of both extracting large quantities of data and processing that data in a way that is meaningful to users. The Web extra at http://youtu.be/pqI2qcigiCw is a video demonstrating Artificial Intelligence for Disaster Response (AIDR), a free, open source, and easy-to-use platform to filter and classify relevant microblog messages during humanitarian crises. View full abstract»

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  • Rich Nonverbal Sensing Technology for Automated Social Skills Training

    Page(s): 28 - 35
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    Automated nonverbal sensing and feedback technologies, such as My Automated Conversation coacH (MACH), can provide a personalized means to better understand, evaluate, and improve human social interaction--for both practical and therapeutic purposes, and to advance future communications research. The first Web extra at http://youtu.be/l3ztu9shfMg discusses My Automated Conversation coacH (MACH), a system for people to practice social interactions in face-to-face scenarios. MACH consists of a 3D character that can see, hear, and make its own decisions in real time. The second Web extra at http://youtu.be/krdwB8bfXLQ discusses software developed at MIT that can be used to help people practice their interpersonal skills until they feel more comfortable with situations such as a job interview or a first date. The software, called MACH (short for My Automated Conversation coacH), uses a computer-generated onscreen face, along with facial, speech, and behavior analysis and synthesis software to simulate face-to-face conversations. It then provides users with feedback on their interactions. View full abstract»

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  • Tracking Mental Well-Being: Balancing Rich Sensing and Patient Needs

    Page(s): 36 - 43
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    Serious mental illnesses are among the most pressing public healthcare concerns. Continuous and unobtrusive sensing of social and physical functioning has tremendous potential to support lifelong health management by acting as an early warning system to detect changes in mental well-being, delivering context-aware micro-interventions to patients when and where they need them and significantly accelerating patients' understanding of their illness. We have presented a range of techniques from our previous and ongoing work to suggest how technologists can make significant advances in this area. While we are still shaping and evaluating these solutions, there is an opportunity for other researchers in our field to help ease the burden of SMIs by striking a balance between cutting-edge sensing and patient needs. This could empower patients by giving them a hand in their own treatment and ultimately lead to more effective, lower-cost treatment. View full abstract»

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  • Internet Voting: An Empirical Evaluation

    Page(s): 44 - 50
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    The results of testing an Internet voting system, introduced as a pilot program in the Canton of Zurich in 2004, provide hard evidence of attitudes toward electronic voting and underline the need to rely on more advanced technology and centralized infrastructure. View full abstract»

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  • Software Experts Summit

    Page(s): 51
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  • New Opportunities for Computer Vision-Based Assistive Technology Systems for the Visually Impaired

    Page(s): 52 - 58
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    Computing advances and increased smartphone use gives technology system designers greater flexibility in exploiting computer vision to support visually impaired users. Understanding these users' needs will certainly provide insight for the development of improved usability of computing devices. View full abstract»

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  • Active versus Passive Malware Collection

    Page(s): 59 - 65
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    An exploration of active and passive malware honeypots reveals that the two systems yield vastly different malware collections and that peer-to-peer file sharing is an important, but often overlooked, malware source. View full abstract»

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  • Mr. Snowden's Legacy

    Page(s): 66 - 70
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    Edward Snowden's ongoing NSA disclosures seem to have the same effect on neoconservative and big-government politicians that a full moon has on werewolves--it just drives them crazy! What did he do to incur all of this acrimony? View full abstract»

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  • Beauty Technology: Body Surface Computing

    Page(s): 71 - 75
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    As wearable technology assumes an increasingly important function in daily life, sensors and other electronic devices applied directly to the skin, in forms like artificial nails and makeup, might further revolutionize human experience. View full abstract»

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  • Standardizing 3D Medical Imaging

    Page(s): 76 - 79
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    Great progress has been made in standardizing 2D medical images, but the standardization of 3D medical models is still lacking. The first Web extra at http://youtu.be/J_h3Pcono7A is a video in which a shoulder muscle is rendered based on a fresh cadaver and then laid out on a computer. The pattern is then applied to a 3D model of a shoulder, with corresponding muscle layers and connections to the bones. The second Web extra at http://youtu.be/u5eVGIuhPUA is a video in which flexion and extension range of motion and movement of the upper arm are applied to a 3D model. The third Web extra http://youtu.be/wS4NPn08NKI is a video rendering showing liquid simulation for realistic virtual surgery and medical communication. The fourth Web extra at http://youtu.be/YZ5PWZyS4E0 is a video rendering showing a colon cancer surgery simulation for realistic virtual surgery and medical communication. The fifth Web extra at http://youtu.be/QN5iJhX8PQ4 is a video rendering showing an arthroscopic surgery simulation for realistic virtual surgery and medical communication. View full abstract»

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  • Making Software Engineering Research Relevant

    Page(s): 80 - 83
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    Practitioners perceive research on global software engineering as useful, yet they rarely read academic articles on the topic. Instead, they look to books, blogs, colleagues, forums, and their own experiences for solutions. Making research more relevant to practice requires a new mindset. View full abstract»

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  • Big Data, Networked Worlds

    Page(s): 84 - 87
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    Big data analytics poses significant challenges for privacy protection. Meeting these challenges requires thinking hard about the increasingly critical role autonomous embedded networks play in all aspects of life. View full abstract»

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  • Learning while Building Games for Teaching

    Page(s): 88 - 91
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    An innovative learning project brings students together with faculty and digital design studio staff to create videogames that help teach basic programming concepts. View full abstract»

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  • The Future of Online Instruction, Part 1

    Page(s): 92 - 93
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    Part one of a two-part series explores the failure of e-learning to meet the expectations of its 20th century proponents. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
Wilmington