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Computing in Science & Engineering

Issue 2 • Date Mar.-Apr. 2014

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Membership Matters [advertisement]

    Page(s): c2
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  • [Masthead]

    Page(s): 1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • What We Publish in CiSE

    Page(s): 4 - 6
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  • Focus on Your Job Search [advertisement]

    Page(s): 7
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  • Numerical Literacy for Physics Undergraduates [Book review]

    Page(s): 8 - 9
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  • Numerical Simulation of Thermomechanical Processes Coupled with Microstructure Evolution

    Page(s): 10 - 15
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    The finite element method is a consolidated tool used in the metal-forming field at an industrial scale. However, further progress is needed regarding the microstructure optimization of components produced by metal-forming processes such as hot forging or rolling. This article presents mathematical models to predict microstructure evolution during hot working, showing an application of mathematical models coupled to a thermomechanical processes' simulation software. View full abstract»

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  • 20-Bit RISC and DSP System Design in an FPGA

    Page(s): 16 - 20
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    These days, most microprocessor and microcontroller designs are based on a Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) core, and many operations - such as discrete cosine transform (DCT), inverse DCT, discrete Fourier transform (DFT), and fast Fourier transform (FFT)--are performed by a digital signal processor (DSP) system. Here, the authors present the design of a RISC and DSP system that uses very high-density logic (VHDL) and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). This RISC is a 20-bit processor. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Computer Society Information House Advertisement

    Page(s): 21
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  • User-Steered Energy Generation and Consumption Multimodel Simulation for Pricing and Policy Development

    Page(s): 22 - 33
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    Understanding energy use is critical. Although simulation is valuable, such models are simplified abstractions of actual energy systems. The authors present an energy system multimodel implemented with the Language and Platform Independent Steering (LAPIS) computational steering API. They present an adaptable framework for the integration and development of multimodel simulations. This framework enables independent development of component simulations, limits coordination overhead between developers, and allows modularity and flexibility in the overall multimodel simulation. Use case studies demonstrate the capabilities of the multimodel energy system simulation and LAPIS. View full abstract»

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  • Survey of Multiscale and Multiphysics Applications and Communities

    Page(s): 34 - 43
    Multimedia
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    Multiscale and multiphysics applications are now commonplace, and many researchers focus on combining existing models to construct new multiscale models. This concise review of multiscale applications and their source communities in the EU and US outlines differences and commonalities among approaches and identifies areas in which collaboration between disciplines could be particularly beneficial. Because different communities adopt very different approaches to constructing multiscale simulations, and simulations on a length scale of a few meters and a time scale of a few hours can be found in many multiscale research domains, communities might receive additional benefit from sharing methods that are geared towards these scales. The Web extra is the full literature list mentioned in the article. View full abstract»

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  • Reveal: An Extensible Reduced-Order Model Builder for Simulation and Modeling

    Page(s): 44 - 53
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    Many science domains need to build computationally efficient and accurate representations of high fidelity, computationally expensive simulations known as reduced-order models (ROMs). This article presents the design and implementation of the Reveal toolset, a ROM builder that generates ROMs based on science- and engineering-domain-specific simulations executed on high-performance computing (HPC) platforms. The toolset encompasses a range of sampling and regression methods for ROM generation, automatically quantifies ROM accuracy, and supports an iterative approach to improve ROM accuracy. Reveal is designed to be extensible for any simulator that has published input and output formats. It also defines programmatic interfaces to include new sampling and regression techniques so users can mix and match mathematical techniques best suited to their model characteristics. The article describes the architecture of Reveal and demonstrates its use with a computational fluid dynamics model used in carbon capture. View full abstract»

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  • A Multiscale Code for Flexible Hybrid Simulations Using ASE Framework

    Page(s): 54 - 62
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    Multiscale computer simulations combine the computationally efficient classical algorithms with more expensive--and more accurate--ab initio quantum mechanical algorithms. Here, the authors describe one implementation of multiscale computations using the Atomistic Simulation Environment (ASE). This implementation can mix classical codes including the large-scale atomic/molecular massively parallel simulator (LAMMPS) and the density functional theory-based projector-augmented wave (PAW) implementation designed to work with ASE. Any combination of codes linked via the ASE interface can be mixed. The authors introduce a framework to easily add classical force-fields calculators for ASE using LAMMPS, which also allows harnessing the full performance of classical-only molecular dynamics. Their work makes it possible to combine different simulation codes (quantum mechanical or classical) with great ease and minimal coding effort. View full abstract»

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  • What's the Score? Matrices, Documents, and Queries

    Page(s): 63 - 67
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    Progress in science and engineering relies on being able to discover relevant previous research results. Here, we investigate algorithms behind retrieving these results using standard search engines. View full abstract»

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  • Fostering Collaborative Computational Science

    Page(s): 68 - 71
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    Encouraging joint efforts among computational scientists could tremendously enhance their speed of response to a changing landscape. View full abstract»

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  • App-Scale Science

    Page(s): 72
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  • Software Engineering for the 21st Century

    Page(s): c3
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  • Rock Stars of Mobile Cloud [advertisement]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

Computing in Science & Engineering presents scientific and computational contributions in a clear and accessible format.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
George K. Thiruvathukal
Loyola University