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Network, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date March-April 2014

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • IEEE Network - cover

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editorial: Open Source for Networking: Protocol Stacks

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 2 - 5
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Portable packet processing modules for OS kernels

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 6 - 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (178 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    During the last 15 years we have been involved in the design and development of some extremely popular pieces of open source software. Two of them, the dummynet network emulator and the netmap framework, are available as kernel components for popular operating systems, and are widely used in several research and commercial projects. In this article we briefly describe the internals of the two systems, discuss the challenges in building kernel components that run on multiple operating systems, and analyze the difficulties in developing and maintaining open source software as part of one's academic activity. View full abstract»

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  • Keyflow: a prototype for evolving SDN toward core network fabrics

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 12 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (254 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The large bulk of packets/flows in future core networks will require a highly efficient header processing in the switching elements. Simplifying lookup in core network switching elements is capital to transport data at high rates and with low latency. Flexible network hardware combined with agile network control is also an essential property for future software-defined networking. We argue that only further decoupling between the control and data planes will unlock the flexibility and agility in SDN for the design of new network solutions for core networks. This article proposes a new approach named KeyFlow to build a flexible network-fabricbased model. It replaces the table lookup in the forwarding engine by elementary operations relying on a residue number system. This provides us tools to design a stateless core network by still using OpenFlow centralized control. A proof of concept prototype is validated using the Mininet emulation environment and OpenFlow 1.0. The results indicate RTT reduction above 50 percent, especially for networks with densely populated flow tables. KeyFlow achieves above 30 percent reduction in keeping active flow state in the network. View full abstract»

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  • Prototyping the recursive internet architecture: the IRATI project approach

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 20 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (194 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In recent years, many new Internet architectures are being proposed to solve shortcomings in the current Internet. A lot of these new architectures merely extend the current TCP/IP architecture and hence do not solve the fundamental cause of these problems. The Recursive Internet Architecture (RINA) is a true new network architecture, developed from scratch, building on lessons learned in the past. RINA prototyping efforts have been ongoing since 2010, but a prototype on which a commercial RINA implementation can be built has not been developed yet. The goal of the IRATI research project is to develop and evaluate such a prototype in Linux/OS. This article focuses on the software design required to implement a network stack in Linux/OS. We motivate the placement of, and communication between, the different software components in either the kernel or user space. The first open source prototype of the IRATI implementation of RINA will be available in June 2014 for researchers, developers, and early adopters. View full abstract»

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  • DROPv2: energy efficiency through network function virtualization

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 26 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (413 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Future Internet devices and network infrastructures need to be significantly more energy-efficient, scalable, and flexible in order to realize the extremely virtualized and optimized ICT/network infrastructures. In this respect, this article presents a recent extension of an open source software framework, the Distributed Router Open Platform (DROP), to enable a novel distributed paradigm for network function virtualization through the integration of software defined network and information technology (IT) platforms, as well as for the control/management of flexible IP router platforms. To answer the need for increased energy efficiency of the network function virtualization paradigms, DROP includes sophisticated power management mechanisms, which are exposed by means of the green abstraction layer (GAL), under consideration for standardization in ETSI. Moreover, the DROP architecture has been specifically designed to act as "glue" among a large number of the most promising and well-known open source software projects, providing network dataor control-plane capabilities. View full abstract»

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  • The OpenLISP control plane architecture

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 34 - 40
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    Among many options tackling the scalability issues of the current Internet routing architecture, the Locator/Identifier Separation Protocol (LISP) appears as a viable solution. LISP improves a network's scalability, flexibility, and traffic engineering, enabling mobility with limited overhead. As for any new technology, implementation and deployment are essential to gather and master the real benefits that it provides. In this article, we present the first complete open source implementation of the LISP control plane. Our implementation is deployed in the worldwide LISP Beta Network and the French LISP-Lab testbed, and includes the key standardized control plane features. Our control plane software is the companion of the existing OpenLISP dataplane implementation, allowing the deployment of a fully functional open source LISP network compatible with any implementation respecting the standards. View full abstract»

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  • Introduction to the quagga routing suite

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 42 - 48
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (169 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Off-the-shelf routing products are often constrained by being designed to meet specific needs, in terms of both software and hardware. Networking professionals may face problems that require customization of software, or additional processing facilities or data storage, which are not provided for by those products. The Quagga Routing Suite provides implementations of several common routing protocols, distributed over multiple processes communicating via IPC, and support for their development, with source code provided under a modification-friendly license. Quagga can help networking professionals build such custom solutions, in combination with other open source software packages. Quagga also provides a path for network researchers to increase the visibility of their work, making it available to a wider community for potential testing and use, increasing the impact of that research. View full abstract»

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  • An open source implementation of the protocol for carrying authentication for network access: OpenPANA

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 49 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (165 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    PANA is the standard proposed by the IETF to carry out network access authentication regardless the underlying access technology. Recently, the protocol has been selected as the standard in several network scenarios such as the Internet of Things and machine-to-machine communications, among others. However, the lack of open source implementations of the standard does not facilitate the testing and deployment of the protocol in different network scenarios, which may hinder its broader expansion and adoption. In this article, we present OpenPANA, our open source contribution, which implements the standard PANA. We describe the design and implementation decisions around OpenPANA so that they can help other developers to create their own implementations. We also show different usage scenarios where the implementation has been considered and used. Finally, we provide performance results and an interoperability test that we have performed with CPANA, the other active open source implementation. View full abstract»

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  • Traffic identification engine: an open platform for traffic classification

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 56 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (277 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The availability of open source traffic classification systems designed for both experimental and operational use, can facilitate collaboration, convergence on standard definitions and procedures, and reliable evaluation of techniques. In this article, we describe Traffic Identification Engine (TIE), an open source tool for network traffic classification, which we started developing in 2008 to promote sharing common implementations and data in this field. We designed TIE¿s architecture and functionalities focusing on the evaluation, comparison, and combination of different traffic classification techniques, which can be applied to both live traffic and previously captured traffic traces. Through scientific collaborations, and thanks to the support of the open source community, this platform gradually evolved over the past five years, supporting an increasing number of functionalities, some of which we highlight in this article through sample use cases. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo